New York State Politics

WAMC photo by Dave Lucas

  Earth Day 2015 is also the first day that the New York State Assembly is transitioning to a paperless system. Assemblymembers have been given I Pads to read bills electronically, and supporters say it will save millions of dollars, and trees.

Majority Leader Joe Morelle announced the change on the Assembly floor.

“Today we begin officially with tablets,” Morelle said.

Getting rid of the piles of paper that clutter members’ desks each day required a constitutional amendment, which voters approved last fall.  

The final stretch of the legislative session began as more accusations arose about potential wrongdoing by top legislative leaders.

Kathy Hochul
Karen DeWitt

State lawmakers are moving ahead with approving some portions of New York Governor Andrew Cuomo’s Women’s Equality Act, now that  supporters are no longer demanding that all of the items, including an abortion rights provision, be tied together.

Office of New York Governor Andrew Cuomo

Budget talks began Wednesday, as New York Governor Andrew Cuomo met behind closed doors with legislative leaders to discuss school aid, economic development proposals and ethics reform. Cuomo’s push to reform practices in the legislature comes at a time when his nearly $1 million dollar book deal is coming under closer scrutiny.

DonkeyHotey/Flickr

Have you been frustrated by a politician lately? Politicians are no angels, and we’re going to let it all out. Alan Chartock hosts.

WAMC/Pat Bradley

  Supporters of Governor Andrew Cuomo’s education tax credit were at the Capitol to persuade lawmakers that the credit, which would benefit donors to private and charter schools, should be approved as part of the state budget.  

DonkeyHotey/Flickr

  Today on the Vox Pop, 2015 is almost upon us. So it’s time to make our annual political predictions for the New Year. Who will run for president? Who will make a power grab? Who is going to be the center of the next scandal? We’ll tell you ours. But we want to know, what are your political predictions for 2015?

James DeMers

  With Election Day and post-election celebrations in the rear-view mirror, politicians are getting down to business as usual. But is business as usual always good business? The United States senate is set to vote on the controversial keystone pipeline today, and the New York State Senate is still hashing out its leadership.

wikipedia.org

  Voters in New York will decide in November whether the state should borrow $2 billion for new technology, including iPads in school classrooms.  Teachers and school administrators who could benefit from the funds say they are supportive but want to see more details.

The Bond Act, as it reads on the November ballot,  would  provide access to classroom technology and high-speed internet connections, as well as offer funds to build more pre kindergarten classrooms, and replace the trailers that some overcrowded schools in New York City have been using to teach students.

WAMC photo by Dave Lucas

In upstate New York and beyond, women have been taking more active roles in politics: running in races for elective office and winning them.  Currently, 98 women serve in the U.S. Congress; 78 in the House; 20 in the Senate, including one from New York, one from Massachusetts and two from New Hampshire. Numbers provided by the Center for American Women in Politics further show that the number of women in statewide executive posts is 75. And the proportion of women in state legislatures is about a quarter.

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