new york times

  The New York Times columnist  Maureen Dowd has covered Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton since the '90s.

Trapped between two candidates with the highest recorded unfavorables, Americans are plunged into The Year of Voting Dangerously. In this perilous and shocking campaign season, Dowd traces the psychologies and pathologies in one of the nastiest and most significant battles of the sexes ever.

  In The Boys in the Bunkhouse: Servitude and Salvation in the Heartland, New York Times writer and columnist Dan Barry tells the harrowing yet uplifting story of the exploitation and abuse of a resilient group of men with intellectual disability, and the heroic efforts of those who helped them to find justice and reclaim their lives.

In the tiny Iowa farm town of Atalissa, dozens of men, all with intellectual disability and all from Texas, lived in an old schoolhouse. Before dawn each morning, they were bussed to a nearby processing plant, where they eviscerated turkeys in return for food, lodging, and $65 a month. They lived in near servitude for more than thirty years, enduring increasing neglect, exploitation, and physical and emotional abuse—until state social workers, local journalists, and one tenacious labor lawyer helped these men achieve freedom.

Zika: The Emerging Epidemic book cover
Zika: The Emerging Epidemic

We've all heard plenty about the Zika virus by now, but it's hard to know how worried to be. What are our chances of getting it? Should we postpone travel plans? Donald G. McNeil Jr. is a science writer for the New York Times, and he attempts to answer those questions and more in his new book Zika: The Emerging Epidemic.

  Best known of award-winning New York Times and Newsweek columns, Anna Quindlen returns with her eighth novel, Miller's Valley. 

The setting is a farming valley in Pennsylvania during the height of the Viet Nam War. Outside influences like the war and a government plan to flood the valley affect the lives of one family - and the community.

  Rev. Christopher Hedges, Ph.D. will be the keynote speaker at The Capital Region Theological Center's Money & Power Symposium this Saturday at the Radisson Hotel on Wolf Road in Albany, NY.

Chris Hedges, whose column is published weekly on Truthdig, has written 11 books, including the New York Times best seller Days of Destruction, Days of Revolt. He was part of the team of reporters at The New York Times awarded a Pulitzer Prize in 2002 for the paper’s coverage of global terrorism. He also received the Amnesty International Global Award for Human Rights Journalism in 2002. In 2014, Chris Hedges was ordained as a minister at the Second Presbyterian Church.

  Few could explain, let alone seek out, a career in criticism. Yet what A.O. Scott shows in his new book: Better Living Through Criticism: How to Think About Art, Pleasure, Beauty, and Truth is that we are, in fact, all critics: because critical thinking informs almost every aspect of artistic creation, of civil action, of interpersonal life.

Drawing on the long tradition of criticism from Aristotle to Susan Sontag, Scott shows that criticism was and always will be the breath of fresh air that allows true creativity to thrive.

A.O. Scott joined The New York Times as a film critic in January 2000. Previously, he was a Sunday book reviewer for Newsday and a frequent contributor to Slate, The New York Review of Books, and many other publications.

Illustration by ALEXIS BEAUCLAIR
Alexis Beauclair

  In our Ideas Matter segment we take time just about every week to check in with the state humanities councils in our 7-state region.

This week we check in with the New York Council for the Humanities to learn about the practice and process of editorial illustration.

Alexandra Zsigmond is the art director of the New York Times Sunday Review, and we're going to speak with her about how politics and history are represented in editorial art. In addition to her work at the Times, Alexandra is one of the New York Council for the Humanities’ new Public Scholars.

  Elaine Sciolino, the former Paris Bureau Chief of the New York Times, invites us on a tour of her favorite Parisian street, offering an homage to street life and the pleasures of Parisian living.

While many cities suffer from the leveling effects of globalization, the rue des Martyrs maintains its distinct allure.

Sciolino reveals the charms and idiosyncrasies of this street and its longtime residents—the Tunisian greengrocer, the husband-and-wife cheesemongers, the showman who’s been running a transvestite cabaret for more than half a century, the owner of a 100-year-old bookstore, the woman who repairs eighteenth-century mercury barometers—bringing Paris alive in all of its unique majesty.

Elaine Sciolino’s new book is The Only Street In Paris: Life On The Rue Des Martyrs.



   Over the years, David Letterman has given very few interviews about his life and career. In that handful, most were with his good friends and broadcasters – Regis Philbin and Larry King.

Earlier this month, Dave gave what amounted to his CBS exit interview with Dave Itzkoff of The New York Times. The piece was a Q&A and covered everything from Letterman talking about the end of his show, his legacy, his aloofness, his health and even his extortion sex scandal.

4/13/15 Panel

Apr 13, 2015

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, SUNY Albany Journalism Professor and Investigative Professor, Rosemary Armao, and political consultant, Libby Post.

Scheduled topics include Hillary Rodham Clinton officially enters the presidential race; President Obama in Cuba; Walter Scott Case Update; NYT Editorial - "A New Phase in Anti-Obama Attacks"; Jordan Spieth wins Masters.

1/6/15 Panel

Jan 6, 2015

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Associate Editor of the Times Union, Mike Spain, and WAMC newsman, Ray Graf.

Topics include NYC Arrest Drop, James Risen Testimony, Boehner Vote, Mario Cuomo's Funeral, and ESPN Streaming.

  Charles M. Blow has been a columnist at the New York Times since 2008. He is known for penning intensely personal pieces and now tells his extraordinary life story in his memoir, Fire Shut Up in My Bones.

The book explores racial, spiritual and sexual complexities and is Blow’s coming of age story of psychic survival and self invention.

8/27/14 Panel

Aug 27, 2014

  Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, newsman Ray Graf, and Albany Journalism Professor and Investigative Reporter, Rosemary Armao.

Topics include:
US Allies
Climate Accord
No NYT Endorsement
If Britain Were a State...
Legroom Fight

Dr. Alan Chartock's Morning Commentary

Jan 3, 2014

WAMC political observer Dr. Alan Chartock discusses last night's snow storm and two editorial pieces in the New York Times about Edward Snowden and New York City Mayor Bill De Blasio.

A 2010 Gallup poll asking Americans to assess the last nine presidents gave John F. Kennedy the highest ranking and highest approval rating at 85 percent.

Historian Robert Dallek- who the New York Times called Kennedy’s leading biographer, whose JFK biography An Unfinished Life was a number 1 New York Times best seller- was somewhat amused by this appraisal. For while he admired Kennedy tenured, Dallek’s own in depth study of the man and his presidency offered him a new assessment of his achievements and flaws.

The poll rekindled his interest in Kennedy’s leadership and he decided to revisit the subject in his new book Camelot’s Court: Inside the Kennedy White House.

This year is the 50th anniversary of the assassination of John F. Kennedy- who is still regarded as one of the most popular notable presidents in US history.

To commemorate the man and his time in office, the newspaper of record has authorized a book, The Kennedy Years: From the Pages of the New York Times. It is edited by presidential historian, Richard Reeves with a forward by the paper’s executive editor, Jill Abramson.

Mitch Albom has carved out a special place among contemporary authors with New York Times best sellers such as Tuesday with Morrie, and Five People You Meet in Heaven.

The humanism and the gift of story telling is on full display in his new novel called, The First Phone Call From Heaven. It is the story of a small Midwestern town whose residents begin to get phone calls from the departed. It is a compelling novel with equal parts mystery, love story, and an allegory about the power of hope and belief.

Mitch Albom will be joining Joe Donahue on stage in Saratoga Springs this Friday night in a Northshire book store event at 7pm. For more information visit Northshire’s website.

From refrigerators to roller-coasters, from neon signs to digital music - everywhere you turn the things around you help explain the fundamentals of science. National Geographic’s new book, The Science of Everything reveals the science behind virtually everything.

David Pogue is the former New York Times tech columnist (he's now with Yahoo) has written the foreword to the book and we welcome him to the show.

8/28/13 - Panel

Aug 28, 2013

  Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Ray Graf and University at Albany Journalism Professor and Investigative Reporter, Rosemary Armao.

Topics include:
Syria Stock Slump
NYT Attack
March on Washington Anniversary

Making it through 50 of anything is quite an accomplishment. Going to 50 baseball games in a lifetime, for people not in the industry, is a feat likely held by a slight percentage of fans. Going to 50 opening days for a single team is an accomplishment shared by a chosen few, the fan elite.

NY Gov. Cuomo to extend tax bracket

Mar 20, 2013
Office of Governor Andrew Cuomo

The New York Times reports that New York Governor Andrew Cuomo is finalizing a deal with legislative leaders to extend a high-tax bracket for wealthy New Yorkers.

The bracket applies to individuals making more than $1 million and married couples making more than $2 million. The measure was first approved in late 2011 and would have expired at the end of the 2014 election year, but, lawmakers are now talking about extending the bracket through 2017.

The New  York Times  is putting its New England holdings, including the Boston Globe up for sale. 

New York Times Obituaries Editors, William McDonald, is back again with a new collection of obituaries for the colorful figures who have died this year. Here's your chance to get a glimpse into the lives of the provocative and powerful, the saintly and the scandalous. Did you know Steve Jobs had a long-lost sister? Or that Loretta Young and Clark Gable had a love child. Or that Stalin’s daughter, Lana Peters - the “little Princess of the Kremlin”—ended up in a cabin in northern Wisconsin?

From false stories about weapons of mass destruction in Iraq to growing competition from online and twenty-four-hour cable news, the first decade of the twenty-first century was not particularly kind to the New York Times.

Host Alan Chartock is joined by New York Times investigative reporter Andrew Lehren, the 2012 Ottaway professor of journalism at the State University of New York at New Paltz this semester.