new york times

From refrigerators to roller-coasters, from neon signs to digital music - everywhere you turn the things around you help explain the fundamentals of science. National Geographic’s new book, The Science of Everything reveals the science behind virtually everything.

David Pogue is the former New York Times tech columnist (he's now with Yahoo) has written the foreword to the book and we welcome him to the show.

8/28/13 - Panel

Aug 28, 2013

  Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Ray Graf and University at Albany Journalism Professor and Investigative Reporter, Rosemary Armao.

Topics include:
Syria Stock Slump
NYT Attack
March on Washington Anniversary

Making it through 50 of anything is quite an accomplishment. Going to 50 baseball games in a lifetime, for people not in the industry, is a feat likely held by a slight percentage of fans. Going to 50 opening days for a single team is an accomplishment shared by a chosen few, the fan elite.

NY Gov. Cuomo to extend tax bracket

Mar 20, 2013
Office of Governor Andrew Cuomo

The New York Times reports that New York Governor Andrew Cuomo is finalizing a deal with legislative leaders to extend a high-tax bracket for wealthy New Yorkers.

The bracket applies to individuals making more than $1 million and married couples making more than $2 million. The measure was first approved in late 2011 and would have expired at the end of the 2014 election year, but, lawmakers are now talking about extending the bracket through 2017.

The New  York Times  is putting its New England holdings, including the Boston Globe up for sale. 

New York Times Obituaries Editors, William McDonald, is back again with a new collection of obituaries for the colorful figures who have died this year. Here's your chance to get a glimpse into the lives of the provocative and powerful, the saintly and the scandalous. Did you know Steve Jobs had a long-lost sister? Or that Loretta Young and Clark Gable had a love child. Or that Stalin’s daughter, Lana Peters - the “little Princess of the Kremlin”—ended up in a cabin in northern Wisconsin?

From false stories about weapons of mass destruction in Iraq to growing competition from online and twenty-four-hour cable news, the first decade of the twenty-first century was not particularly kind to the New York Times.

Host Alan Chartock is joined by New York Times investigative reporter Andrew Lehren, the 2012 Ottaway professor of journalism at the State University of New York at New Paltz this semester.