new york

Governor Cuomo says he no longer thinks settling the issue of making teacher evaluations public “urgent,” and will allow the legislature to leave later this week without an agreement on the matter.  Capitol Correspondent Karen DeWitt reports…  

Cuomo, speaking on former Governor David Paterson’s radio show on WOR, says the legislature will end its session for the summer without acting on a plan on how to make public teacher evaluations public, saying that the evaluations do not have to be completed by schools until January, anyway.

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo and legislative leaders say they have agreed on a sweeping reform of the state's system of caring for the disabled that has been marked for years by abuse and death.  WAMC’s Ian Pickus reports…

For Cuomo, the deal announced Sunday fulfills a major legislative goal.

Recent governors have been dogged for years by outcry from whistle blowers and a chilling New York Times series was published this year about abuse within the massive bureaucracy caring for 1 million people.

Governor Andrew Cuomo and leaders of the Senate and Assembly say they've reached agreement on legislation making all viewing of child pornography online illegal.  WAMC’s Ian Pickus reports…

The bill was introduced by Sen. Martin Golden, a retired police officer, after the Court of Appeals upheld a challenge to the state's child pornography law last month.

The legislation passed the Senate on May 15. Assemblyman Joe Lentol, co-sponsor, says the bill is expected to pass the Assembly this week.

Ian Pickus, WAMC News.

York Senate leader Dean Skelos says the Legislature is close to a deal on a law to require college coaches, professors and others to report sex abuse. WAMC’s Dave Lucas reports…

The Senate majority leader tells The Associated Press that what's referred to as the Sandusky bill is among the top priorities for the legislative session that ends June 21.

New York State Attorney General Eric Schneiderman says Chesapeake Appalachia has agreed to let more than 4,400 landowners renegotiate old gas leases for more favorable financial and environmental terms. More from WAMC’s Dave Lucas…

Chesapeake also agreed to pay $250,000 to cover the state's investigation costs. The agreement was announced Thursday. 

NY Lawmakers Back Parental Consent for Piercing

Jun 14, 2012

New York lawmakers have passed legislation that would require minors to get parental consent for body piercings other than their ears.  WAMC’s Tristan O’Neill reports…

Sponsors say that about a third of people with piercings get them before they turn 18, and complications like allergic reactions, skin infections, scars and discomfort are common.

Some piercing studios currently require written consent for minors. The law would require owners or operators to get a signed parental consent and keep that on file for a year.

Religious leaders rallied at the State Capitol to push for an increase in the state’s minimum wage. They urged Governor Cuomo to get off the fence and advocate for passage in the legislature.  Capitol Correspondent Karen DeWitt reports…

Singing “We Shall Not Be moved”, clergy from a variety of religious faiths gathered at the Capitol’s million dollar staircase to urge Governor Cuomo to use his influence to convince the Senate to approve an increase in the state’s minimum wage before the session ends next week.

New York Senate Majority Leader Dean Skelos says he expects a deal to be announced soon to maintain a price break for beer, which has helped New York's craft brewers grow. WAMC’s Dave Lucas reports…

A Belchertown, Massachusetts brewer had successfully sued to eliminate the price break for its New York competitors.

The Seneca Indian Nation's gambling business says a new construction project will make its Niagara Falls casino more distinctive on the city skyline.

Jim Wilson of the Seneca Gaming Corporation says the project on top of the existing hotel tower won't add more rooms, but will change signage to make the tower more identifiable.

Executives plan to release more details on Monday.

Employees of the University of Rochester are losing a major benefit: free tuition for their children who attend the college.

Administrators at the private college tell the Democrat and Chronicle that starting in 2013, children of the university's faculty and staff will no longer get free tuition.

But they won't have to pay UR's tuition of nearly $43,000. Instead, they'll pay the rate charged to attend the state's public four-year colleges, about $5,600.

The change won't affect students already enrolled at UR or who will begin college this fall.