new yorker

  Ever since Donald Trump entered the presidential race—in a press conference attended by paid actors, in which he slandered Mexican immigrants—he has dominated headlines, becoming the unrestrained id at the center of one of the most bizarre and alarming elections in American history.

It was not always so. In 1996, longtime New Yorker writer Mark Singer was conscripted by his editor to profile Donald Trump. At that time Trump was a mere Manhattan-centric megalomaniac, a failing casino operator mired in his second divorce and (he claimed) recovering from the bankruptcy proceedings that prompted him to inventory the contents of his Trump Tower home. 

In Trump and Me, Singer revisits the profile and recounts how its publication lodged inside its subject’s head as an enduring irritant—and how Singer (“A TOTAL LOSER!” according to Trump) cheerfully continued to bait him.

  William Finnegan is an author and staff writer with the New Yorker best known for covering conflicts in Somalia, Sudan and Mexico, and gritty corners of America and South Africa. War and peace, life and death, policy failures and injustice. He has covered it all.

So, it makes perfect sense that his new memoir is about surfing. His new book – already a bestseller - is Barbarian Days: A Surfing Life. Finnegan says surfing only looks like a sport and to initiates, it is something else entirely: a beautiful addiction, a demanding course of study, a morally dangerous pastime, a way of life.

Finnegan is the author of several books: Cold New World, A Complicated War, and Crossing the Line. He has twice been a National Magazine Award finalist and has won numerous journalism awards. He is a staff writer at The New Yorker since 1987.

  For almost fifteen years, Matthew Diffee’s uniquely funny single-panel cartoons have appeared in The New Yorker, winning him countless fans, awards, and fodder for more cartoons.

His new book, Hand Drawn Jokes for Smart Attractive People, is a hilarious mix of cartoons, visual riffs, and illustrated one-liners that will appeal to anyone – even smart attractive people.

The collection contains Diffee’s funniest drawings and writings from the past decade as well as all-new cartoons and sketches organized into categories that will appeal to people in all walks of life, based on profession and circumstance.

The Sendak Fellowship was established in 2010 as a residency program for artists who tell stories with illustration. The fellowship offers the time for artists to explore their craft outside the limitations of everyday life and in the relative isolation of a rural setting.

    

  New Yorker staff writer and best-selling author Elizabeth Kolbert offers a startling look at the mass extinction currently unfolding before us in her new book – The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History.

Over the last half billion years, there have been five major mass extinctions – we’ll learn more about the sixth with Elizabeth Kolbert.

    It is always a thrill to welcome New Yorker Cartoonist Liza Donnelly to the program. She has a new book of cartoons and writing, Women on Men that is available as an e-book.

The book is a collection of over 200 of her cartoons. The theme is primarily about women being funny.

Liza Donnelly has been publishing cartoons in the New Yorker since 1982. She is also a weekly columnist and cartoonist for Forbes.com, specializing in politics and women’s rights, and for three years, Donnelly has been drawing a weekly cartoon on gender issues and women’s rights for the news site, Women’s Enews.

After the Fall: A Novel introduces us to a brilliantly eccentric family from New York’s Upper East Side.