news

Police in an upstate New York city say an officer has shot and wounded a suspected parole violator during a traffic stop.

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Police in an upstate New York city are investigating the fatal shooting of a man whose body was found in a driveway.

Officials say officers responded around 8:45 p.m. Monday to shots fired on Grove Street in the Saratoga County city of Mechanicville, on the Hudson River 15 miles north of Albany.

When officers arrived they found a man dead in a driveway between two homes. Police later identified him as 19-year-old David Feliciano. 

New York State Police investigators are assisting Mechanicville police with the investigation.

No arrests have been reported.

As a veteran broadcast journalist and the co-anchor of CNN’s New Day, Alisyn Camerota knows a little something about the fast-paced world of cable news.

In her debut novel Amanda Wakes Up, she offers a fictional behind-the-scenes peek at this one-of-a-kind job - a blur of breaking news, big scoops, and colorful personalities.

Federal and local officials are combing Mississippi soybean fields for clues in a military plane crash that killed 15 Marines and a Navy sailor.

Our tech guru Jesse Feiler joins us this morning to discuss social media in the news and as the news.  

Jesse Feiler helps people and organizations get to know and use new technologies. Projects have included building the page caching module for the Prodigy Web Browser for Mac in the very early days of the Web, location-based apps for iPhone and iOS, as well as books and classes on new technologies. Forthcoming books include “iPad For Seniors for Dummies" (9th edition) and “Learn Apple HomeKit on the Mac and iOS.”

Current projects involve using apps and FileMaker databases for identifying and managing risk in nonprofit organizations as well as helping small communities build location-based apps to promote tourism, downtown economic development, and the wise use of natural resources. 

  NPR's oddly informative weekly hour-long news quiz program, Wait Wait…Don’t Tell Me! returns to Tanglewood in Lenox, MA on September 1.

The Peabody Award-winning series offers a fast-paced, irreverent look at the week's news, hosted by Peter Sagal along with judge and score-keeper Bill Kurtis. 

Bill Kurtis joins us. 

  We will be honest, we had two very successful mystery writers booked to be on this morning’s show. But, after what happened in Baton Rouge yesterday after what happened over the past 10 days, we became uncomfortable with the idea of talking about police and crime as entertainment. We will have both authors on in the days to come – but this morning – we wanted to talk with Dr. Frankie Bailey instead.

She is a professor in the School of Criminal Justice at the University at Albany. She studies crime history, and crime and mass media/popular culture. She is also the author several mysteries including two police procedural novels featuring Albany police detective Hannah Stuart. 

  For decades, women battered the walls of the male fortress of television journalism. After fierce struggles, three women—Diane Sawyer, Katie Couric, and Christiane Amanpour—broke into the newsroom’s once impenetrable “boys’ club.”

These extraordinary women were not simply pathbreakers, but wildly gifted journalists whose unique talents—courage and empathy, competitive drive and strategic poise—enabled them to climb to the top of the corporate ladder and transform the way Americans received their news.

Sheila Weller's new book is The News Sorority: Diane Sawyer, Katie Couric, Christiane Amanpour—and the (Ongoing, Imperfect, Complicated) Triumph of Women in TV News.

    The news is everywhere. We can’t stop constantly checking it on our computer screens, but what is this doing to our minds?

We are never really taught how to make sense of the torrent of news we face every day, writes Alain de Botton (author of the best-selling The Architecture of Happiness), but this has a huge impact on our sense of what matters and of how we should lead our lives. In his new book, de Botton takes twenty-five archetypal news stories—including an airplane crash, a murder, a celebrity interview and a political scandal—and submits them to unusually intense analysis with a view to helping us navigate our news-soaked age.

WAMC's David Guistina gets the morning headlines from Judy Patrick, managing editor of the Daily Gazette.

WAMC's David Guistina gets the morning headlines from Mike Spain, associate editor of the Albany Times-Union.

WAMC's Ian Pickus gets the morning headlines from Judy Patrick, managing editor of the Daily Gazette.

WAMC's David Guistina gets the morning headlines from Mike Spain, associate editor of the Albany Times-Union.