nostalgia

    The Breakfast Club defined an entire generation of pop culture and included such talent as Molly Ringwald “the princess,” Anthony Michael Hall “the brain,” Emilio Estevez “the jock,” Judd Nelson “the criminal,” and Ally Sheedy “the basket-case.”

It is likely the late John Hughes most-loved film and it's receiving a cinema re-release from Fathom Events tomorrow night and next Tuesday, March 31st. To commemorate the anniversary, we spoke with Kirk Honeycutt about his book, John Hughes: A Life in Film.  

Honeycutt is the former chief film critic for The Hollywood Reporter for many years and subsequent to that, senior film reporter for that publication. Honeycutt is a member of the prestigious Los Angeles Film Critics Association, and is the creator of Honeycutt's Hollywood, a popular film review website.

    Americans cherish their national myths, some of which predate the country’s founding. But the time for illusions, nostalgia, and grand ambition abroad has gone by, according to journalist Patrick Smith in his new book, Time No Longer.

He says Americans are now faced with a choice between a mythical idea of themselves, their nation, and their global “mission,” on the one hand, and on the other an idea of America that is rooted in historical consciousness.