novel

  After two acclaimed story collections, Laura Van Den Berg presents Find Me, her debut novel - a gripping, darkly funny tale of a young woman struggling to find her place in the world.

Her first collection of stories, What the World Will Look Like When All the Water Leaves Us, was a Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers selection and a finalist for the Frank O'Connor International Short Story Award. Her second collection of stories, The Isle of Youth, received the Rosenthal Family Foundation Award for Fiction from the American Academy of Arts and Letters.

Presented by the NYS Writers Institute - Laura will read from Find Me tomorrow at 8:00 p.m. at the Huxley Theatre at the NYS Museum in Albany. At 4:15 p.m., she will hold an informal seminar in the Standish Room in the Science Library on the UAlbany uptown campus.

  Helen Klein Ross is a multi-talented writer. Her poetry, essays and fiction have appeared in The New Yorker, The New York Times, and numerous literary journals and anthologies. Her first novel was Making It: A Novel of Madison Avenue and her new novel is, What Was Mine and has already been chosen by People magazine as a Best New Book of 2016.

What Was Mine tells the story of Lucy Wakefield—a seemingly ordinary woman who does something extraordinary in a desperate moment: she takes a baby girl from a shopping cart and raises her as her own. It’s a secret she manages to keep for over two decades.

When Lucy’s now-grown daughter Mia discovers the devastating truth of her origins, she is overwhelmed by confusion and anger and determines not to speak again to the mother who raised her. What follows is a ripple effect that alters the lives of many and challenges our understanding of the very meaning of motherhood.

Helen Ross Klein will be on the Saturday Fiction Panel at the Woodstock Writer’s Festival.

  I’ll See You in Paris by Michelle Gable is based on the real life of Gladys Spencer-Churchill, the Duchess of Marlborough, a woman whose life was so rich and storied it could fill several books. Nearly a century after Gladys’s heyday, a young woman’s quest to understand the legendary Duchess takes her from a charming hamlet in the English countryside, to a dilapidated manse kept behind barbed wire, and ultimately, to Paris, where answers will be found at last. In the end, she not only solves the riddle of the Duchess but also uncovers the missing pieces in her own life.

In The Girl in the Red Coat by Kate Hamer, newly single mom Beth has one constant, gnawing worry: that her dreamy eight-year-old daughter, Carmel, who has a tendency to wander off, will one day go missing. And then one day, it happens: On a Saturday morning thick with fog, Beth takes Carmel to a local outdoor festival, they get separated in the crowd, and Carmel is gone.

  The villains who abuse our monetary system get what's coming to them in The Capitalist, the fifth novel in the critically acclaimed Louis Morgon series, written by cartoonist, painter, and novelist, Peter Steiner.

  After completing her MFA program in non-fiction, Hannah Tennant-Moore set off on a two-month sojourn to Sri Lanka to examine her longtime interest in Buddhism before beginning the next chapter of her professional career.

Immersed in the culture of the country and surrounded by the fascinating people that she got to know, she began to connect the threads that would form her new novel, Wreck and Order.  The result is a novel of ideas that looks at spirituality, sex, life, friendship, and the eternal quest for fulfillment in life and love that drives us all. 

  The Golden Notebook Bookstore and author Robert Burke Warren will be celebrating the publication of his debut novel, Perfectly Broken.

The Perfectly Broken Book Party with Music will take place at the Kleinert/James Arts Center in Woodstock on Saturday where Robert will read, play songs featured in the story, hold a Q & A, and sign books.

The novel tells the story of Grant Kelly. His rock star days may be behind him, but as a stay-at-home dad his life is getting more interesting by the day. It's the beginning of the post 9/11 era, and he and his wife and four-year-old son have traded a New York City apartment for a Catskills farmhouse, where ghosts from the past, worries for the future, and temptations in the present converge to bring about drastic changes in their marriage, their friendships, and their family.

  Tomorrow night at 7 p.m. USA Today bestselling author Alison Gaylin will be at the Kleinert/James Center for the Arts for a reading from her new novel, What Remains of Me, a novel of psychological suspense, set in the glamorous, wealthy world of Hollywood a darkly imaginative and atmospheric tale of revenge and betrayal, presumed guilt and innocence lost, dirty secrets and family ties reminiscent of the bestsellers of Laura Lippman, Gillian Flynn, and Harlan Coben.

The event is presented by The Golden Notebook and New York Times bestselling author Abigail Thomas will interview Gaylin and discuss What Remains of Me.

  Girl Through Glass is the literary debut of Sari Wilson. It tells the story of a young girl's coming-of-age in the cut-throat world of New York City ballet - a story of obsession and perfection, trust and betrayal, beauty and lost innocence.

In the roiling summer of 1977, eleven-year-old Mira is an aspiring ballerina in the romantic, highly competitive world of New York City ballet. Enduring the mess of her parents divorce, she finds escape in dance the rigorous hours of practice, the exquisite beauty, the precision of movement, the obsessive perfectionism. Ballet offers her control, power, and the promise of glory. In the present day, Kate, a professor of dance at a midwestern college, embarks on a risky affair with a student that threatens to obliterate her career and capsize the new life she has painstakingly created for her reinvented self.

Sari Wilson will be in conversation with Darlene Myers of Northeast Ballet at Northshire Bookstore in Saratoga Springs on Thursday, February 25th at 6 p.m.

  Umberto Eco, an Italian scholar and author of best-selling novels, notably The Name of the Rose, died on Friday at his home in Milan, Italy. He was 84.

As a semiotician – one who studies signs and symbols and how they are used – Mr. Eco sought to interpret cultures and his scholarly studies were infused into his fiction writing.

Umberto Eco joined us on The Book Show in 2012 to discuss his then most-recent novel, The Prague Cemetery – a work that was denounced by the Vatican. We air a portion of that conversation in memoriam today. 

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