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The Best of Our Knowledge host Bob Barrett chats with Ira Flatow
Michael Spooneybarger / CREO

Back in the early 1970s, a new network called National Public Radio hired a young producer out of college who had two special interests: baseball and science. And since the network didn’t plan on doing much sports coverage, he finally got on the air with that other topic.

Today on the Best Of Our Knowledge, I sit down with Ira Flatow, the person who founded NPR’s Science Unit and the host of the weekly public radio program Science Friday.

We’ll also spend an academic minute with the millions of cells in your body that don’t really belong to your body…your microbiome.

  From the beloved host and creator of NPR’s All Songs Considered and Tiny Desk Concerts comes an essential oral history of modern music, told in the voices of iconic and up-and-coming musicians, including Dave Grohl, Jimmy Page, Michael Stipe, Carrie Brownstein, Smokey Robinson, and Jeff Tweedy, among others—published in association with NPR Music.

Is there a unforgettable song that changed your life?

NPR’s renowned music authority Bob Boilen posed this question to some of today’s best-loved musical legends and rising stars.

  In his new book, A Nation Of Nations: A Great American Immigration Story, veteran NPR correspondent  Tom Gjelten assesses the impact and importance of the 1965 Immigration and Naturalization Act by interweaving the story a handful of immigrant families with the history and analysis of the immigration changes in America as a whole. The fiftieth anniversary of the 1965 act is this month and immigration continues to be a hot button issue in American politics.

Tom Gjelten is a long time NPR news correspondent, he's covered wars in Central America, the Middle East, and the former Yugoslavia, as well as major national stories in the United States. His NPR reporting has won him two Overseas Press Club Awards, a George Polk Award, and a Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Award. 

Doby Photography /NPR

Our guest Ari Shapiro has been a frequent voice on WAMC's airwaves as an NPR correspondent for years. He spent four years covering the White House and five as Justice Correspondent; in fact, he was once an intern for NPR's Legal Affairs Correspondent Nina Totenberg. Now, he is on to his next job, and it's his highest-profile gig yet: anchor of All Things Considered, which airs on WAMC weekdays 4-6 p.m.

  Tomorrow evening in the Recital Hall at the University at Albany, Morning Edition host David Greene and NPR reporter Yuki Noguchi will co-host an NPR Family Matters event, presented by WAMC and WMHT.

Together with Michelle Singletary, a nationally-syndicated personal finance columnist for The Washington Post, and financial planner Louis Barajas [lew-iss buh rah hass], they’ll tackle a number of topics, like paying for college, buying a home and saving for retirement. The event is free and open to the public.

On October 15th NPR's Morning Edition Host David Greene and NPR reporter Yuki Noguchi will be in Albany with Michelle Singletary, a nationally syndicated personal finance columnist for the Washington Post, and financial planner Louis Barajas for a conversation about personal finance. It is part of NPR's Family Matters Series.

They will tackle a number of topics like paying for college, buying a house, and paying for retirement. All of this happens October 15th at the University at Albany Recital Hall.

Kainaz Amaria

NPR’s Guy Raz has been a frequent presence on these airwaves for a decade and a half, working as the network’s youngest ever foreign correspondent, the host of weekend All Things Considered, and his current gig at the helm of the TED Radio Hour.

Peter A. Smith Photography/NPR

WAMC listeners noticed a new voice on the air in September when Arun Rath took over the host’s chair at NPR’s Weekend All Things Considered, which is now broadcasting from NPR West in Culver City, Calif.

    Award-winning journalist, current NPR host and special correspondent, and former co-host of NPR's newsmagazine All Things Considered, as well as Best Selling Author and creator of The Race Card Project, Michele Norris comes to Bard College at Simon's Rock to discuss her work and offer her perspective on tackling complex conversations and having meaningful dialogue about race and diversity.

Michele Norris is an award-winning journalist with more than two decades of experience. She is currently a host and special correspondent for NPR. Previously, Norris served as co-host of NPR's newsmagazine All Things Considered, public radio's longest-running national program, with Robert Siegel and Melissa Block.

In September, 2010, Norris released her first book, The Grace of Silence: A Memoir, which focuses on how America talks about race in the wake of Barack Obama's presidential election, and explores her own family's racial legacy.

3/14/13 - Panel

Mar 14, 2013

  Today's panelists are Dr. Alan Chartock, Assistant Professor of Journalism at the University at Albany, Rosemary Armao, and WAMC Morning Edition host, David Guistina.

This morning our discussion topics include:
1. Pope Francis I
2. Shooting in Herkimer
3. NPR for younger listeners
4. H&R Block Filing Error

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