NYPD

NYPD Holds Counterterrorism Drill

Mar 28, 2016

The New York Police Department practiced how officials and officers would respond to a Brussels-style attack.

  Growing up in the rough outskirts of northern Dublin at a time when joining the guards, the army, or the civil service was the height of most parents’ ambitions for their children, Luke Waters knew he was destined for a career in some sort of law enforcement. Dreaming of becoming a police officer, Waters immigrated to the United States in search of better employment opportunities and joined the NYPD.

In NYPD Green Waters offers a gripping and fascinating account filled with details from real criminal cases involving murder, theft, gang violence, and more, and takes you into the thick of the danger and scandal of life as a New York cop—both on and off the beat.

  Linda Fairstein was chief of the Sex Crimes Unit of the district attorney’s office in Manhattan for more than two decades and is America’s foremost legal expert on sexual assault and domestic violence. Her Alexandra Cooper novels are international bestsellers and have been translated into more than a dozen languages.

After publishing sixteen novels, Fairstein can still keep her legion of fans on the edge of their seats, offering rollercoaster plot twists and simmering emotional foreplay between her two main characters, NYPD Detective Mike Chapman and District Attorney Alexandra “Coop” Cooper.

She forwards the story in her new novel, Devil’s Bridge.

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New York's highest court has blocked an effort to unseal the testimony that a grand jury heard before declining to indict a police officer in the chokehold death of Eric Garner.

Public Domain, Wikimedia Commons

Detectives from the New York Police Department have visited a rural upstate town as part of their investigation into the disappearance of a Queens man nearly 30 years ago.

  

  The recent arrest in New Orleans and the HBO documentary The Jinx have put Robert Durst back in the headlines. Matt Birkbeck was the first reporter to access Durst’s NYPD files. His book on Durst, A Deadly Secret, was the very book found in Durst’s own apartment when it was searched by police.

Based on interviews with family, friends, and acquaintances of Durst, law enforcement, and others involved in the case, A Deadly Secret is a cross-country odyssey of stolen IDs and multiple identities that raises baffling questions about one of the country’s most prominent families—and one of its most elusive suspected killers.

The New York City Police Department has announced it has started to use a gunshot detection system.  The rollout of the technology in the nation’s largest police department comes seven years after the police department in Springfield, Massachusetts started using the system called ShotSpotter.   

ShotSpotter uses acoustic sensors to pinpoint the location of gunfire and transmit the information within seconds to police dispatchers and to laptop computers in police cruisers. A map on the computer screen shows where the gun was fired and there is an audio recording of the shots.

  What happens when you pair up Woodstock’s Marshall Karp and Newburgh native James Patterson to write a best-selling novel? Well, you get a book with incredible, non-stop action - a Patterson trademark - and great Karp characters and crisp humor.

NYPD Red 3 is the pair’s fourth collaboration, following up NYPD Red 1 & 2 and Kill Me if You Can.

An award-winning former advertising executive, Marshall Karp is a playwright and a screenwriter, and has written and produced numerous TV shows. Having paid his dues in Hollywood, he began killing the people he used to work with - in his novels - the Lomax and Biggs series.

NY Man Faces Charges Of Threatening Police Officers

Jan 7, 2015

A New York man who allegedly issued online threats against police officers in a Westchester city has been charged with a federal crime.

Stephen Gottlieb: Police Accountability

Jan 6, 2015

I’ve been reading a case decided in the European Court of Human Rights. It involved opposing libel suits arising out of claims of police brutality in Bergen, Norway.[1] The opinion of four judges, whose names I will not try to pronounce, struck me. The judges pointed out that the purpose of the libel suits brought by the police officers “was to suppress the debate on this issue....” But they pointed out that the government has “a monopoly over force” and that monopoly “also entails the danger of force being abused to the detriment of the very values it is meant to uphold.” Therefore “abuse of force by officials is not just one of many issues of broad general interest.” Instead, “it is ... a matter of primary concern in any society.” Keeping authorities in check is particularly important for a democracy. And the ability to hold the states’ use of force in check requires protecting those who raise the alarm.

1/5/15 Panel

Jan 5, 2015

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Associate Editor of the Times Union, Mike Spain, and political consultant Libby Post.

Topics include NYPD Funeral, State of Union Preview Tour, FBI Security Bias, Boston Bomb Trial Move Rejected and local stories from The Times Union.

Tweets From The NYPD

Dec 31, 2014
twitter

The nation's largest police department is sending its top brass to an in-house "Twitter school" as part of an effort to soften the NYPD's image and engage with the people they serve. Every precinct and some special commands have a twitter account. 101 in total.

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A few Hudson Valley county executives are weighing in about the planned introduction of state legislation to retrofit all police vehicles in New York with bulletproof glass.

Two state senators and two assemblymembers, including Republican Jim Tedisco, say they are drafting legislation after two New York City police officers were gunned down in their car over the weekend. Republican Rockland County Executive Ed Day, now retired from the New York City Police Department, likes the idea.

12/22/14 Panel

Dec 22, 2014

The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are Times Union Associate Editor Mike Spain, College of St. Rose Communications Professor Mary Alice Molgard and political consultant Libby Post.

Topics include: Murder of NYPD Police Officers, North Korea, DeBlasio Tensions, and Marijuana in New York.

Government leaders from New York are reacting to the killing of two New York City police officers, Wenjian Liu and Rafael Ramos. Both were shot while sitting in a patrol car in Brooklyn’s Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood.

Cox didn't have any sample body cams to display, but here's an example.
eBay

President Obama’s call to equip police officers across the country with body cameras could change the way police interact with civilians, including those accused of breaking the law. Some experts say more study is needed before police agencies will know how beneficial body cameras can be and what the impacts really are.

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A group of some 75 University at Albany students shut down part of Washington Avenue on Wednesday afternoon in a peaceful protest, joining thousands of other Americans turning out in a show of solidarity against what's  perceived as police violence targeting black men. Events already were scheduled for today tied to Ferguson, but with Wednesday's grand jury decision not to indict a white New York City police officer caught on video putting a deadly chokehold on Eric Garner, the number of protests has multiplied.

4/23/14 Panel

Apr 23, 2014

  Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, WAMC Newsman Ray Graf and Daily Gazette Editor, Judy Patrick.

Topics include:
Affirmative Action
Aereo
Pujols
Sherpa Strike
NYPD Twitter
Political Demographics

Debate on the New York Police Department’s ‘Stop and Frisk’ policy reached a fever pitch this month as officials trade barbs amid what has thus far been a hot and volatile summer in many of the nation’s metropolitan areas, including New York, which saw 77 people shot in the first week of July, a 12 percent increase over the same period last year.

Four New York City lawmakers are suing the city over its treatment of the Occupy Wall Street protests. WAMC’s Dave Lucas reports

The civil rights suit was filed Monday in a Manhattan federal court. It says police conduct is so problematic that the force needs an outside monitor.

The city Law Department had no immediate comment Monday. Mayor Michael Bloomberg has defended police handling of the protests.

Occupy demonstrators have gone to court before over particular episodes. The new lawsuit is a compendium of complaints.

NYPD: Powder Mailed to Bank Branches Non-Toxic

May 1, 2012

Police say the white powder contained in several envelopes that were mailed to various bank branches in New York City turned out to be non-toxic.

Police say seven envelopes were sent Monday to several Wells Fargo branches, a JP Morgan Chase branch and an office building. Telephone calls to Wells Fargo and JP Morgan Chase were not immediately returned.

Police say the suspicious envelopes caused evacuations of several bank branches, but no injuries were reported. Police had no suspects.

The envelopes were sent on the eve of planned May Day protests around the country.