Nutrition, Not Just Exercise, Key To Getting In Summer Shape

May 6, 2013
Jennifer Chait, flickr

With the warmer weather here, more people are heading outdoors and striving to be in better shape and lose weight -- but it’s not all about being active. As WAMC’s Michael Masciadrelli reports, it’s all about paying more attention to proper nutrition.

    Pulitzer Prize–winning investigative reporter, Michael Moss, from The New York Times joins us to tell the explosive story of the rise of the processed food industry and its link to the emerging obesity epidemic.

Moss reveals how companies use Salt, Sugar, and Fat to addict us and, more important, how we can fight back.

WIkimedia Commons/Marlith

One day before a ban on certain sugary beverages in certain settings in New York City was set to take effect; a state judge ruled yesterday that the policy, championed by Mayor Michael Bloomberg, should not be imposed.

In his ruling, Justice Milton A. Tingling Jr. called the rules, “arbitrary and capricious,” echoing consumer and beverage industry claims that the rules, which would include restricting the size of sugary drinks to 16 ounces or less at restaurants, street carts, and entertainment venues, are confusing and unenforceable.

    When a doctor pronounced Dara-Lynn Weiss’s daughter Bea obese at age seven, the mother of two knew she had to take action. But how could a woman with her own food and body issues—not to mention spotty eating habits—successfully parent a little girl around the issue of obesity?

In the late 1970s when the government mandated we get the fat out of our food, our next guest says the food industry responded by pouring more sugar in. Dr. Robert Lustig believes the result has been a perfect storm, disastrously altering our biochemistry and driving our eating habits out of our control.

For too many Americans, the end of the Thanksgiving meal was followed by a “food coma.”  During the holidays, many of us know that we eat too much.

It turns out that, on average, Americans eat too much during the rest of the year too.

Unfortunately, eating too much can have devastating consequences.  Three quarters of all healthcare costs are attributed to chronic diseases such as heart disease and diabetes. The major drivers of those costly chronic conditions are tobacco use and obesity which are both preventable and treatable.