olympics

  Forty years ago, when a young Ginny Gilder stood on the edge of Boston’s Charles River and first saw a rowing shell in motion, it was love at first sight. Yearning to escape her family history, which included her mother’s emotional unraveling and her father’s singular focus on investment acumen as the ultimate trophy, Gilder discovered rowing at a pivotal moment in her life.

Having grown up in an era when girls were only beginning to abandon the sidelines as observers and cheerleaders to become competitors and national champions, Gilder harbored no dreams of athletic stardom. Once at Yale, however, her operating assumptions changed nearly overnight when, as a freshman in 1975, she found her way to the university’s rowing tanks in the gymnasium’s cavernous basement.

Course Correction: A Story of Rowing and Resilience in the Wake of Title IX recounts the physical and psychological barriers Gilder overcame as she transformed into an elite athlete who reached the highest echelon of her sport and recounts lessons learned from her journey.

Keith Strudler: Boston 2024?

Mar 25, 2015

Never say that the place that fought for American democracy doesn’t still care about voting. It does, and it will. About the 2024 Olympic Games, that is. Where once it seemed the Boston and greater Massachusetts public wouldn’t have its say about the cities proposed bid to host the 2024 Summer Games, now they’ll have their moment. In a turn of events, the advocacy group Boston 2024 and its chairman John Fish will seek statewide approval for the city’s bid through a public referendum, which Fish himself will help get on the ballot. And if the commonwealth, or even just the city votes against it, Fish promised he and his organization will step down. No Boston bid. No new stadiums. No hotels. No rings – five Olympic or three circus, as the case may be.

3/25/15 Panel

Mar 25, 2015

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, Associate Editor of The Times Union, Mike Spain, and WAMC newsman Ray Graf.

Scheduled topics include: Afghanistan Pullout; No Survivors in French Alps Crash; Tunisian Attack Aftermath; Boston Vote on Olympics; Bill Cosby Tour.

Even though she's not yet 25, in some ways, Nastia Liukin has already led several lives — and has done so on the world stage.

Keith Strudler: A Buyer's Market For Olympics

May 28, 2014

Consider this the Olympic winter clearance sale. For the time being, the International Olympic Committee will be seriously slashing the entry fee to have your very own nation host the 2022 Winter Olympic Games. Historically, the price tag to buy one of these luxury items has been uniquely high. In fact, Russia just spent some $51 billion hosting the winter games in Sochi. And for that price, they got a whole bunch of unfinished buildings, a massive dog round up, and a whole lot of negative press. Given that, there seems to be a remarkable drought in potential buyers of Sochi’s legacy. While the 2018 Winter Games were long ago awarded to South Korea, the bidding for the 2022 event is ongoing as we speak. And it seems, unlike recent history, it’s a buyer’s market.

From left to right: Ida Sargent, Liz Stephen, Hannah Dreissigacker, Susan DunkleeCredit Annie Mackin/National Wildlife FederationEdit | Remove

Four of Vermont’s winter Olympic athletes are speaking out on the impact on climate change sports and the need for global policies to stem the threat.

WAMC/Pat Bradley

The newspaper in the center of the Adirondacks covering Saranac Lake and Lake Placid is sending two of its reporters to the Sochi Olympics.  Chris Knight talks about his trip to Russia to cover the local athletes competing in the winter games.

Olympic Regional Development Authority

Thirty-four years ago, the Winter Olympics were held in our region in a small village, with much less spectacle than the modern games. As the Sochi games approach, some of the people involved with the Lake Placid Olympics are looking back at the 1980 Games — and noticing just how much the Games have changed.

Keith Strudler: Terror And The Olympics

Jan 3, 2014

In a New Year’s announcement, International Olympic Committee president Thomas Bach declared that “terrorism must never triumph” and that Russia would host a “safe and secure” Winter Olympic Games next month. Like most New Year’s resolutions, we can only hope this rings true. For the current time, it seems a lofty goal. Just Monday, the Russian city of Volgograd suffered its second suicide bombing in 24 hours, this one on a passenger bus killing at least 16 people. The previous day’s attack killed at least 18 at a rail station. Both appear linked to Chechen rebels and a movement to attack civilians in route to disrupting next month’s Olympic Games in Sochi, Russia. While these attacks happened hundreds of miles away from the Olympic site, if the radical rhetoric is to be believed, these are just part of a larger process of eventually infiltrating the Olympic sites and venues themselves, something that hasn’t happened in any wide scale in the history of the Modern Olympic Games.

U.S. Department of Defense / Glenn Fawcett

The New Year—in addition to a monster snow storm—is bringing with it some exciting sports news. Notably, the BCS championship between Auburn and Florida State kicking off Monday night, and the rapid approach of the Winter Olympics in Sochi. We’re talking sports today with our WAMC Sports Commentator Keith Strudler.  

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