painter

  From Maira Kalman, the author of the bestsellers The Principles of Uncertainty and The Elements of Style, comes a pictorial and narrative exploration of the significance of objects in our lives, drawn from her personal artifacts, recollections, and selections from the collection of the Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum.

With more than fifty original paintings and featuring bestselling author and illustrator Maira Kalman’s signature handwritten prose, My Favorite Things is a meditation on the importance of both quotidian and unusual objects in our culture and private worlds.

  Winslow Homer: The Nature and Rhythm of Life is a new exhibition at the Arkell Museum at Canajoharie. It will be on display through January 4, 2015.

Bartlett Arkell, the founder and first president of the Beech-Nut Packaging Company, brought Homer’s paintings and watercolors to his hometown of Canajoharie for the enjoyment of its citizens.

    

  Thomas Cole was the founder of The Hudson River School of painting – the mid-19th century American art movement of landscape paintings with an aesthetic vision influenced by romanticism.

The Thomas Cole Historic Site in Catskill, NY has a new exhibition entitled Master, Mentor, Master: Thomas Cole & Frederic Church which is on view now and will be until November 2nd 2014. They are also running a capital campaign is to bring back one of the few known architectural creations of Thomas Cole – his New Studio.

Here to tell us more are Betsy Jacks, ‎Director at Thomas Cole Historic Site and Kate Menconari, the site’s curator.

    

  Painter Darren Waterston's installation Filthy Lucre is the centerpiece of Uncertain Beauty, his new exhibition at MASS MoCA in North Adams, MA (on view through January 2015). It is a contemporary re-imagining of James McNeill Whistler's 1876 decorative masterpiece Harmony in Blue and Gold: The Peacock Room.

A soundscape featuring voice and cello composed by the New York-based trio BETTY can be heard intermittently through the space, punctuating the silence with hauntingly beautiful reverberations.

Edward and Jo Hopper first discovered Vermont in 1927, making day trips from the Whitney Studio Club's summer retreat for New York artists in Charlestown, New Hampshire. In 1935 and 1936 the Hoppers again traveled to Vermont, this time from their summer home in Cape Cod, in Edward's continuing search for new places to paint.

During these quests they identified the White River and what Edward considered to be Vermont's "finest" river valley, and they returned there for longer visits in 1937 and 1938, boarding at Robert and Irene Slater's Wagon Wheels farm in South Royalton.