parenting

  American children spend four to seven minutes a day playing outdoors—90 percent less time than their parents did. Yet recent research indicates that experiences in nature are essential for healthy growth.

Yet, according to our next guest, teachers, parents, and other caregivers lack a basic understanding of how to engender a meaningful, lasting connection between children and the natural world.

Scott Sampson is a dinosaur paleontologist and host of PBS Kids’ Dinosaur Train. His new book is How to Raise a Wild Child.

  When ADHD first appeared in the DSM in 1987, 3 percent of U.S. children were thought to have the disorder. By 2000, the number increased to 7 percent. In 2014 that number jumped to an alarming 11 percent of children and 15 percent of high school students. Two-thirds of these children are on medication. In contrast, in countries like France, Finland, the UK and Japan, the number is a half of one percent, and far fewer children taking medication.

In the new book: A Disease Called Childhood: Why ADHD Became an American Epidemic, Dr. Marilyn Wedge brings together the latest developments in neuroscience and clinical research, a history of big pharma and psychiatry, and cultural studies of educational systems around the world.

    Finding the right caregiver can be one of the most life-changing decisions a parent makes. Whether it's a kindly neighbor for the weekday latchkey hours, a teenage babysitter one night a week, or a full-time professional nanny, the right caregiver can enrich a child's world and literally grow her brain. Hire the wrong one, and this person could cause developmental delays and stress for the entire family.

In her new book, Secrets of the Nanny Whisperer: A Practical Guide for Finding and Achieving the Gold Standard of Care for Your Child, nationally recognized parenting expert Tammy Gold draws from her extensive background in child developmental psychology, social work, and family therapy to offer the first childcare bible for parents.

  Already the biological parents of a seven-year-old son and a five-year-old daughter, Claude Knobler and his wife decided to adopt Nati, a five-year-old Ethiopian boy who seemed different from Knobler in every conceivable way.

In his book, More Love, Less Panic: 7 Lessons I Learned About Life, Love, and Parenting After We Adopted Our Son from Ethiopia, explains how his experiences raising Nati led him to learn a lesson that applied equally well to parenting his biological children: It’s essential to spend the time we are given with our children to love them and enjoy them, rather than push and mold them into who we think they should be.

      According to the National Center for Health Statistics, less than half of the people who get married in the United States remain with their first spouse, and less than 50 percent of children grow up with both biological parents. In short, we live in a society of blended families. Everyone who survives a divorce and enters a new family is vulnerable.

  George Glass, MD, a board-certified psychiatrist, has designed a book, Blending Families Successfully: Helping Parents and Kids Navigate the Challenges So That Everyone Ends Up Happy, to help parents understand the challenges of beginning new lives with blended families, and to help their children make the necessary adjustments.

    

  National Coming Out Day is October 11th. There is a new guide for parents to help them answer questions when their son and/or daughter come out to them. We welcome the authors of the new: This is a Book for Parents of Gay Kids.

  In her new book, Rescuing Julia Twice, Tina Traster tells foreign-adoption story - from dealing with the bleak landscape and inscrutable adoption handlers in Siberia, to her feelings of inexperience and ambivalence at being a new mother in her early forties, to her growing realization over months then years that something was “not quite right” with her daughter, Julia, who remained cold and emotionally detached.

    

  Parents are accused of being both permissive and overprotective, unwilling to set limits and afraid to let their kids fail. Young people, meanwhile, are routinely described as entitled and narcissistic...among other unflattering adjectives.

In The Myth of the Spoiled Child, Alfie Kohn systematically debunks these beliefs--not only challenging erroneous factual claims but also exposing the troubling ideology that underlies them. Complaints about pushover parents and coddled kids are hardly new, he shows, and there is no evidence that either phenomenon is especially widespread today--let alone more common than in previous generations.

Listener Essay - Folding Laundry

Apr 3, 2014

    Pamela Ethington is a writer who divides her time between Syracuse, where her home is, and Woodstock, N.Y., where her heart is. Her work has been published in New Millenium Writings. She is a student of author Martha Frankel in Woodstock.

Mayim's Vegan Table

Apr 2, 2014

    While she's an actress (Blossom, The Big Bang Theory) with a PhD in neuroscience, at the end of the day Mayim Bialik is a mom, one who knows what it's like to be a busy parent with little time to spend in the kitchen.

She shares the concerns of parents everywhere: when it comes to nutrition and feeding your family, you want healthy meals, but also food that everyone—kids and parents—can enjoy, and a balanced lifestyle that's inexpensive and fuss-free.

Mayim's Vegan Table share more than 100 easy plant-based recipes for dishes that are as good to eat as they are good for you.

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