photographer

Capital region resident Patrick Harbron began his career photographing the luminaries of rock and roll. Rock and Roll Icons: Photographs by Patrick Harbron is an exhibition at the Albany Institute of History & Art taken from Harbron’s body of concert and portrait photography of influential musicians and groups of the 1970’s and 1980’s, captured at pivotal moments in their careers.

The exhibition features many photographs that have never been published or exhibited. Harbron photographed artists such as Blondie, Rush, Stevie Ray Vaughan, The Police, Bruce Springsteen, Madonna and Elvis Costello early in their careers. He followed these artists to prominence and others that were already well known including The Rolling Stones, Pink Floyd, Led Zeppelin, Van Halen, Eric Clapton, David Bowie, Queen, The Who, Genesis, KISS, U2, Aerosmith, and Prince.

The exhibition will include Harbron’s collection of posters and ephemera gathered throughout his career along with guitars borrowed from the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. The exhibit runs from November 5th through February 12th. 

  Hudson Valley Ruins is a photography and architecture exhibition at The New York State Museum based on the work of Robert Yasinsac and Thomas Rinaldi.

Their 2006 book, Hudson Valley Ruins: Forgotten Landmarks of an American Landscape, studies the region's forgotten cultural treasures. In addition to great river estates, the book profiles sites more meaningful to everyday life in the Valley: churches and hotels, commercial and civic buildings, mills and train stations.

The show is on display at The New York State Museum through December 31st and this Saturday the artists will be on hand for a guided tour and book signing. 

  The regional premiere of the Donald Margulies play Time Stands Still opens tonight and runs through October 15th at the Curtain Call Theater in Latham, NY.  

After barely surviving a bomb blast in Iraq, photojournalist Sarah Goodwin finds herself caught in a tug of war between her career and the quiet of domestic life.

Returning home into the care of her long-time lover, James, Sarah is caught off-guard by James’ desire for family and by the simple domestic life pursued by Richard, her editor, and his much younger girlfriend, Mandy. Two of the cast-members join us this morning – Amy Lane and Tom Templeton. 

  Richard Michelson has had a wonderful friendship with actor and artist Leonard Nimoy. After Nimoy’s passing, Michelson has written a new picture book, Fascinating: The Life of Leonard Nimoy.

He is also presenting a beautiful exhibit: UNSEEN: Fifty never before exhibited photographs by Leonard Nimoy which is now open and runs through October 25th.

Michelson will be speaking in Great Barrington on September 9th from 10:30 to noon presented by The Jewish Federation of the Berkshires and will have a publication party. Later that night will be the official opening of UNSEEN at the R. Michelson Galleries in Northampton, MA.

To celebrate the September 8th - 50th anniversary of the first Trek episode – we welcome Richard Michelson to The Roundtable.

Gregory Crewdson

  Gregory Crewdson will discuss the making of his most recent body of work in a conversation with acclaimed author Rick Moody at The Mahaiwe on Monday, August 15th at 7pm.

The evening will include the first ever projected slideshow presentation of Cathedral of the Pines in its entirety, set to Yo La Tengo's "Night Falls on Hoboken," remixed specially for this event by Grammy-winning producer/engineer Drew Brown.

Cathedral of the Pines (2013–14) was made during three productions in and around the rural town of Becket, Massachusetts. The work premiered at Gagosian Gallery in New York earlier this year, and will be seen for the first time in Europe, concurrently in Brussels and Paris in September.

Rick Moody is the author of six novels, three collections of stories, a memoir, and a collection of essays on music. His most recent publication is Hotels of North America, a novel. He writes regularly about music at The Rumpus, and writes the column "Rick Moody, Life Coach," for LitHub.

Art Photograph - The Barn by Gregory Crewdson
Gregory Crewdson

  Photographer Gregory Crewdson’s career has spanned three decades. His work has been exhibited widely in the United States and Europe and is included in many public collections, including The Museum of Modern Art, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Whitney Museum of American Art, The Brooklyn Museum, The Los Angeles County Museum and The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.

Crewdson’s newest body of work entitled, Cathedral of the Pines, will premiere at Gagosian Gallery in New York City this Thursday - January 28th.

Comprised of 31 digital pigment prints, this series was made during three productions in and around the rural town of Becket, Massachusetts. 

  Lynsey Addario was just finding her way as a young photographer when September 11 changed the world. One of the few photojournalists with experience in Afghanistan, she got the call to return and cover the American invasion.

Addario finds a way to travel with a purpose. She photographs the Afghan people before and after the Taliban reign, the civilian casualties and misunderstood insurgents of the Iraq War, as well as the burned villages and countless dead in Darfur. She exposes a culture of violence against women in the Congo and tells the riveting story of her headline-making kidnapping by pro-Qaddafi forces in the Libyan civil war.

She writes about her experiences in her memoir, It's What I Do: A Photographer's Life of Love and War.

Marisa Scheinfeld

  Photographer Marisa Scheinfeld grew up in New York’s Catskills region, not far from its legendary resorts of the Borscht Belt, a name derived from the area’s popularity with Jews from the New York region who for years were not welcome at many other vacation spots.

For much of the 20th century the Borscht Belt was a thriving vacation destination, home to hundreds of hotels and motels, from famed high-end resorts such as Grossinger’s and the Concord to modest bungalow colonies. In its heyday, the area was known especially for its nightlife, with top comedians and other performers appearing regularly there.

By the time Scheinfeld was growing up there in the 1980s and ‘90s, however, economic and other factors had sent the region into rapid decline, leading many of the hotels and clubs to close. For the past five years, Scheinfeld has documented that decline through a series of evocative, sometimes ghostly large-scale images of dozens of empty hotels.

An exhibit of that work, Echoes from the Borscht Belt: Contemporary Photographs by Marisa Scheinfeld, is at the Yiddish Book Center’s Brechner Gallery.

    

Lionel Delevingne - author/photographer of To the Village Square: From Montague to Fukushima: 1975 – 2014 is a collection of photographs telling the story of citizens who spoke up against the nuclear power industry and who fought for years to stop construction or to close reactors in their backyards.

Through Lionel Delevingne’s record, readers can see the tragedies of the worst accident sites: Three Mile Island in the United States, Chernobyl in Russia, and Fukushima in Japan.

Lionel Delevingne is a photojournalist native of France, settled in the US since 1975, who has traveled and photographed throughout the world. He will be talking about and signing his new book: To the Village Square: From Montague to Fukushima: 1975-2014 on Wednesday, November 5 at 7:00 PM at the Odyssey Bookshop in South Hadley.

  The leading authority on digital photography, Tom Ang celebrates the greatest photographs – and photographers – of all time in his 30th book, Photography: The Definitive Visual History.

When Marie Colvin was killed in an attack in Syria in February 2012, the world mourned the loss of the greatest war correspondent of her generation.

Marie was known for her signature style, her black eye patch and the pearls gifted from Arafat, and her fearlessness in covering some of the world’s most dangerous conflicts. She died while reporting on the suffering of Syrian civilians,sacrificing her life with a cause she believed in- the need to witness the bear anonymous victims of war.

Telling her story for the first time is Paul Conroy, a British war photographer who had forged a close bond with Marie, and was with her when she died. His book is Under the Wire: Marie Colvin’s Final Assignment. It is a gripping and moving account of their friendship, and of their final assignment to one of the most hellish places on Earth.

  The new book Dorothea Lange: Grab a Hunk of Lightning is a volume that celebrates one of the 20th century’s most important photographers- led off by and authoritative biographical essay by Elizabeth Partridge, Lange’s goddaughter.