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Metroland 8/27/15

Aug 27, 2015

  Shawn Stone, the Arts Editor of Metroland, lets us know what is coming to area stages and screens this week.

  This week, Albany Civic Theater opens a production of Patrick Hamilton’s suspenseful drama, Angel Street.

Angel Street tells the story of the Manninghams who live on Angel Street in 19th Century London. As the curtain rises, all appears the essence of Victorian tranquility. It is soon apparent however, that Mr. Manningham, a suavely handsome man, is slowly, intentionally, driving his devoted wife, Bella, to the brink of insanity.

Inspector Rough from Scotland Yard is convinced that Manningham is a homicidal maniac.

Gradually the inspector restores Bella's confidence in herself and as the evidence against Manningham unfolds, theater goers are treated to some of the most brilliant, suspenseful sequences in modern theater

The production at Albany Civic Theater is directed by Jennifer Van Iderstyne who joins us now along with Kevin MacNamara who plays Jack Manningham in Angle Street and John Sutton who plays Inspector Rough.

  Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival is presenting an adaptation of Homer’s epic An Iliad for one actor that is making the rounds in the Valley this August.

HVSF's first solo show stars Kurt Rhoads as the ageless Poet who unleashes the fury of an ancient story he has told for centuries - creating heroes and battles before our eyes, challenging us to contemplate both the heroism and horror of war.

The New York Times said this OBIE Award-winning play is "spellbinding...an age-old story that resonates with tragic meaning today."

The show is directed by Gaye Taylor Upchurch and features longtime HVSF actor Kurt Rhoads.

The show will be performed at Basilica Hudson on 8/16, on Bannerman Island on 8/22 and 8/23, and at the HVSF tent at Boscobel House and Gardens on 8/21 and 8/24.

  The final mainstage production of this summer’s Williamstown Theatre Festival line-up began previews last night. Artistic Director Mandy Greenfield’s inaugural season ends with Eugene O’Neill’s final masterpiece, A Moon for the Misbegotten. The show will run in Williamstown through August 23rd.

Gordon Edelstein, Artistic Director at the Long Warf Theatre in New Haven, is directing and brings years of O’Neill experience to this invigorating look at what he calls “one of the great sad love stories in modern dramatic literature.”

A Moon for the Misbegotten stars Audra McDonald as Josie Hogan and Will Swenson as James Tyrone Jr. Married couple McDonald and Swenson are two of the best and most in-demand actors working today. Swenson recently left the Broadway revival of Les Miserables after playing Javert for more than a year, other New York credits include Murder Ballad, Little Miss Sunshine, Priscilla Queen of the Desert, and the acclaimed Public Theater production of Hair which ran off-broadway, moved to Broadway for a summer of love, and toured the country. Will was nominated for a Tony Award for his portrayal of Berger. He is also a film director.

Audra McDonald has won a record 6 Tony Awards - one for her work in each of the following: Carousel, Master Class, Ragtime, A Raisin in the Sun, Gershwin’s Porgy and Bess, and Lady Day at Emerson's Bar and Grill. She is the only person to have won one in each acting category. She’s also a television and film actress, featured in the new Meryl Streep movie, Ricki and the Flash, written by Diablo Cody and directed by Jonathan Demme.

  The world Premiere of Mother of the Maid is now playing at Shakespeare & Company’s Bernstein Theatre through September 6th.

Penned by the Emmy award-winning writer of HBO’s Olive Kitteridge, Jane Anderson, this powerful and wry comedy follows the tale of Joan of Arc, as seen through the eyes of her mum who is doing her very best to accept the fact that her daughter is different.

Parenthood, religion, sexuality and politics all play a role. Tina Packer stars as the Mother of the Maid. We are joined now by the writer Jane Anderson and director Matthew Penn.

  I Saw My Neighbor On the Train and I Didn’t Even Smile is a world premiere play by Suzanne Heathcote currently running at The Berkshire Theatre Group’s Unicorn Theatre in Stockbridge, MA. The production is directed by Jackson Gay world premiere, co-produced by New Neighborhood.

This is Rebecca’s life: she wakes up, eats a sensible breakfast, wraps herself in three layers, drives to the train station, commutes to her bookkeeping job in the city, watches the clock, goes home, cooks dinner for her domineering mother, watches TV, and falls asleep grieving for her dead dog. Every day is the same as the next until Rebecca’s underachieving brother begs her to take care of her troubled niece—and she does what she always does—she lets it happen. In an unforgivingly bitter month, three generations of women with nothing in common, except a deeply buried ache, try to keep the cold away.

I Saw My Neighbor On the Train and I Didn’t Even Smile features longtime BTG artist Keira Naughton as Rebecca, as well as Linda Gehringer, and Ariana Venturi who join us.

*The audio for this interview is lower quality than our other posts. Our first recording failed and we had to retrieve this from a back-up source. 

curiousonbroadway.com

 The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time is nominated for 6 Tony Awards including Best New Play. It’s been called “the most inventive new show on Broadway.” The acclaimed National Theatre production of the show won 7 Olivier Awards. It opened in New York in October and a national tour was recently announced.

Tony Award winner Marianne Elliott directs an adaptation by two-time Olivier Award winner Simon Stephens. Based on Mark Haddon’s best-selling novel, the drama follows Christopher — a 15-year-old mathematics savant with an often crippling antisocial disorder — as he pieces together clues to solve a neighborhood mystery and comes to a greater understanding of his own family.

  American children spend four to seven minutes a day playing outdoors—90 percent less time than their parents did. Yet recent research indicates that experiences in nature are essential for healthy growth.

Yet, according to our next guest, teachers, parents, and other caregivers lack a basic understanding of how to engender a meaningful, lasting connection between children and the natural world.

Scott Sampson is a dinosaur paleontologist and host of PBS Kids’ Dinosaur Train. His new book is How to Raise a Wild Child.

  Can You Hear Me Baby? Stories of Sex, Love, and OMG Birth! is being presented as a staged reading with music on March 27th and 28th at Berkshire Theatre Group's Unicorn Theatre in Stockbridge, MA as a benefit for the National Perinatal Association, Berkshire Festival of Women Writers and WAM Theatre.

Written by Lisa Rafel, with music by Lisa Rafel and Gary Malkin, Can You Hear Me Baby? brings together birth stories and original music to dramatize the joy, challenges, personal courage and profundity of birth.

Here to tell us more are playwright Lisa Rafel and the production’s director/producer Jayne Atkinson.

'Souvenir' At TheRep

Mar 11, 2015

  At the turn of the last century, Florence Foster Jenkins was a New York phenomenon where she rose to fame for her annual sold-out recitals at the Ritz Carlton and Carnegie Hall. Crowds went wild when Mrs. Jenkins tackled the most difficult arias in opera, festooned in fabulous costumes.

The only trouble was: Mrs. Jenkins could not sing. Not a note. Still, Florence, a YouTube sensation far ahead of her time, could not be deterred from her dedication to music and voice lessons with her accomplished and compassionate accompanist, Cosme McMoon.

Souvenir is a play by Stephen Temperley about Florence Foster Jenkins and Cosme McMoon. It is currently running at Capital Repertory Theatre in Albany, NY. The production is directed by CapRep’s Producing Artistic Director, Maggie Mancinelli-Cahill.

Jonas Cohen plays afore mentioned “compassionate accompanist,” Cosme McMoon and he joins us to discuss the play.

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