political cartoons

"High Wire" By Jules Feiffer
rmichelson.com

This morning we meet cartoonist and illustrator Jules Feiffer whose new exhibit, "A Dance to Spring, Astaire, and Getting Old: New Works by Jules Feiffer at 89," is on display at the R. Michelson Galleries in Northampton, Massachusetts through May 31st.

Feiffer’s revolutionary political cartoons were a fixture in the Village Voice from 1956 until 1997. He has also illustrated children’s books including "The Phantom Tollbooth" and "Bark George," wrote plays and screenplays, novels, graphic novels, and animated film shorts. He has received an Oscar, Obie, and a Pulitzer.

There will be an Artist Reception Friday, April 13th 6-8PM in conjunction with Arts Night Out at the galleries.

    Author, editor and publisher Victor S. Navasky will draw on his most recent book when he delivers the 26th annual Fox-Adler Lecture at Skidmore College. “The Art of Controversy: Political Cartoons and Their Enduring Power” is the title of Navasky’s talk, to be presented at 5:15 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 18, in Gannett Auditorium of Palamountain Hall. A reception and book signing will immediately follow in the Class of 1967 lobby adjacent to the auditorium.

Navasky’s talk has the same title as his newest book, which describes how transformative and incendiary cartoons can be. He said, “Cartoons and cartoonists are usually thought of as irrelevant, trivial, ‘not serious.’ However, that is not true.

Victor Navasky will be in conversation with Peter Biskind on Saturday afternoon at 4PM at Spencertown Academy Arts Center.

  As a former editor of The New York Times Magazine and the longtime editor of The Nation, Victor Navasky knows just how transformative—and incendiary—cartoons can be. In his new book, The Art of Controversy, Navasky guides readers through some of the greatest cartoons ever created.