Politics

Reality. It used to seem so simple—reality just was, like the weather. Why question it, let alone disagree about it? And then came the assault, an unending stream of “fake news,” “alternative facts,” and lies disguised as truths that is overwhelming our notions of reality. Now we can’t even agree on what a fact is, let alone what is real. How on earth did we get here?
         
Every week, the award-winning journalist Brooke Gladstone, along with her co-host Bob Garfield, reaches 1.2 million listeners through more than 420 NPR affiliate stations with WNYC Studios' On the Media, a shrewd and witty newsmagazine that analyzes media and how it shapes our perceptions of the world.

Her new book is The Trouble with Reality: A Rumination on Moral Panic in Our Time.

For more than a decade, Daniel Connolly has reported on Mexican immigration to the U.S. South for news organizations including The Associated Press in Little Rock, and The (Memphis) Commercial Appeal. The winner of numerous journalism prizes, he has received grants and fellowships from the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting, the International Center for Journalists and the Fulbright program.

In his new book, The Book of Isaias: A Child of Hispanic Immigrants Seeks His Own America 18-year-old high school senior Isaias Ramos plays in a punk rock group called Los Psychosis and likes to sing along to songs by Björk and her old band, the Sugarcubes. He’s so bright that when his school’s quiz bowl goes on local TV, he acts as captain. The counselors at school want him to apply to Harvard. But Isaias isn’t so sure. He's thinking about going to work painting houses with his parents, who crossed the Arizona desert illegally from Mexico.

The Destruction of Hillary Clinton is an answer to the question many have been asking: How did an extraordinarily well-qualified, experienced, and admired candidate -- whose victory would have been as historic as Barack Obama's -- come to be seen as a tool of the establishment, a chronic liar, and a talentless politician?

Susan Bordo is a media critic, cultural historian, and feminist scholar. Her books include Unbearable Weight, which was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, and, most recently, The Creation of Anne Boleyn. She is Professor of Gender and Women’s Studies at the University of Kentucky.

This election cycle was so absurd that celebrated political satirist, journalist, and die-hard Republican P. J. O’Rourke endorsed Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton. 

In How the Hell Did This Happen?, P.J. brings his critical eye and inimitable voice to some seriously risky business.

The election of Donald Trump rocked an already divided America and left scores of citizens, including the nearly sixty-five million voters who supported Hillary Clinton, feeling bereft and powerless.

Now, Gene Stone, author of The Bush Survival Bible, offers guidance and solutions they can use to make a difference in this serious call-to-arms—showing them how to move from anger and despair to activism as the Trump inauguration approaches. His new book is The Trump Survival Guide.

Stone outlines political and social concepts—including such issues as Civil Rights, Women’s Rights, the Environment, Obamacare, International relations, and LGBTQ Rights—providing a brief history of each, a refresher on Obama's policies, and an analysis of what Trump’s administration might do. 

Ralph Nader knows a thing or two about running for President of the United States.

Named by The Atlantic as one of the hundred most influential figures in American history, and by Time and Life magazines as one of the most influential Americans of the twentieth century, Ralph Nader has helped us drive safer cars, eat healthier food, breathe better air, drink cleaner water, and work in safer environments for more than four decades.

In his new book, Breaking Through Power, Ralph Nader draws from a lifetime waging--and often winning--David vs. Goliath battles against big corporations and the United States government. He highlights the success stories of fellow Americans who organize change and work together to derail the many ways in which wealth manipulates politics, labor, media, the environment, and the quality of national life today.

What do you think of when you hear about an African American Republican? What is it really like to be a black person in the Republican Party?

Stanford University Professor Corey Fields’ new book: Black Elephants in the Room considers how race structures the political behavior of African American Republicans and discusses the dynamic relationship between race and political behavior in the purported “post-racial” context of US politics.

Drawing on first-person accounts, the book sheds light on the different ways black identity structures African Americans' membership in the Republican Party. Moving past rhetoric and politics, we learn the importance of understanding both the meanings African Americans attach to racial identity and the political contexts in which those meanings are developed and expressed. 

Garry Trudeau, the iconic cartoonist who created Doonesbury and has been skewering our political lives for over four decades has also worked in theater and television.

In an event last night, presented by Oblong Books and Music at The White Hart Inn in Salisbury, CT, we spoke with Trudeau about his career, politics, and his new book is Yuge!: 30 Years of Doonesbury on Trump.

It is unlike the second career of any other president: “Bill Clinton” is a global brand, rising from the dark days of his White House departure to become one of the most popular names in the world.

In Man of the World: The Further Endeavors of Bill Clinton, Joe Conason describes how that happened, examining Clinton’s achievements, his failures, his motivations, and his civilian life. He explains why Clinton’s ambitions for the world continue to inspire (and infuriate).

Lost Radio Rounders, Albany’s acclaimed acoustic American roots duo, recently released Politics & Patriots, a 15-song album that shines a light on campaign songs from George Washington to Franklin Delano Roosevelt. The disc features Tom Lindsay and Michael Eck playing over 24 different instruments.

The combo is also takes the show on the road, playing 10 dates in seven counties and two states during the run up to Election Day. Lindsay and Eck recount the history behind the songs, noting, with a chuckle, that in terms of political rancor, backstabbing and name-calling there truly is nothing new under the sun.

Lost Radio Rounders will begin its official Politics & Patriots tour with a special record release concert 7 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 6 at Mabee Farm Historic Site in Rotterdam. We welcome Tom Lindsay and Michael Eck.

Kenneth Woodward edited Newsweek's Religion section from 1964 until his retirement in 2002. He remained a writer-at-large at Newsweek until 2009.

His new book is Getting Religion: Faith, Culture, and Politics from the Age of Eisenhower to the Era of Obama.

Beginning with a bold reassessment of the Fifties, Woodward’s narrative weaves through Civil Rights era and the movements that followed in its wake: the anti-Vietnam movement; Liberation theology in Latin America; the rise of Evangelicalism and decline of mainline Protestantism; women’s liberation and Bible; the turn to Asian spirituality; the transformation of the family and emergence of religious cults; and the embrace of righteous politics by both the Republican and Democratic Parties. 

  The New York Times columnist  Maureen Dowd has covered Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton since the '90s.

Trapped between two candidates with the highest recorded unfavorables, Americans are plunged into The Year of Voting Dangerously. In this perilous and shocking campaign season, Dowd traces the psychologies and pathologies in one of the nastiest and most significant battles of the sexes ever.

Moral Monday Comes To Capitol In Albany

Sep 12, 2016
Reverend Emily McNeill, with the New York Labor Religion Coalition, addresses a rally outside the state capitol on Monday.
Karen DeWitt

Religious and labor advocates rallied at the state capitol in Albany Monday as part of a nationwide movement known as Moral Mondays, to urge state lawmakers to take more progressive stances on issues.

  Money in politics — it’s widely cited as one of democracy’s biggest ills.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Massachusetts Congressman Jim McGovern, a Democrat from the second district, concludes his discussion with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

  John Dickerson is Moderator of Face the Nation and Political Director of CBS News and a columnist for Slate magazine. In the 2016 Election cycle he has interviewed every major candidate multiple times and was the chief moderator of CBS News' Democratic Debate.

The stakes are high. The characters full of striving and ego. Presidential campaigns are a contest for control of power in the most powerful country on earth. The battle of ideas has a clear end, with winners and losers, and along the way there are sharp turning points-primaries, debates, conventions, and scandals that squeeze candidates into emergency action, frantic grasping, and heroic gambles.

Whistlestop tells the human story of nervous gambits hatched in first-floor hotel rooms, failures of will before the microphone, and the cross-country crack-ups of long-planned stratagems.

  The Seagle Music Colony in Schroon Lake is presenting the world premiere production of a new opera by composer Evan Mack and librettist Joshua McGuire based on the novel Roscoe by Pulitzer Prize winning author William Kennedy.

With music that draws from many popular 20th-century styles, the story follows the character Roscoe Conway, a king-pin in the mid 1940’s Albany political machine, as he navigates his way through a multitude of political and personal challenges, both past and present.

Performances take place from August 3rd through the 6th. To tell us more we welcome composer Evan Mack, librettist Joshua McGuire, Seagle Music Colony Artistic Director Darren Woods and Pulitzer Prize winning author William Kennedy. 

  In our Ideas Matter segment we take time just about every week to check in with the state humanities councils in our 7-state region.

Today, we will learn about the political impact of millennials and about a public lecture happening in August in Charlemont, MA, on the profound demographic transformation happening today, as characterized by the Millennial and Boomer generations.

We are joined today by Pam Porter, of The Charlemont Forum, and by Paul Taylor, who is the former Executive Vice President of the Pew Research Institute and the author of The Next America: Boomers, Millennials and the Looming Generational Showdown Paul will be speaking at the Charlemont Forum in Charlemont, MA, on Wednesday, August 10th. 

  The Capitol Steps were founded in December, 1981 when some staffers for Senator Charles Percy were planning entertainment for a Christmas party. Since then, they’ve been putting the “mock” in democracy in Washington, D.C., on tour, on the radio, and – during the summer – here in Lenox, MA.

The musical satirists call The Cranwell Spa and Golf Resort their summer home – performing here every night except Tuesday through September 2nd.

We are joined this morning by longtime steppers, Bari Biern and Jack Rowles.

  Red Hot Patriot: The Kick-ass Wit of Molly Ivins is a staged reading with Nancy Rothman at PS21 in Chatham on Friday night at 8PM.

It’s an election year, so what better time to enjoy a play based on the famous witticisms of political columnist and humorist Molly Ivins? Her satirical insights into the American political system still ring true today, and twin-sister journalists Margaret and Allison Engel have written a very funny show celebrating Ivins’ courage and tenacity.

Nancy Rothman has acted on stages in NYC, regionally and abroad, as well as on film, television and radio. She is also a favorite with local audiences, and has graced the PS21 stage on numerous occasions. Nicola Sheara is directing Nancy in the reading and we welcome them both to The Roundtable.

Listener Essay - I Liked Ike

Jun 23, 2016

    

  This listener essay is by Steve Lewis. 

I Liked Ike

I liked Ike. He looked like a nice man on the red, white and blue button I saw on someone’s lapel at the Bohack’s. Somebody’s grandpa. He also looked kind of snappy saluting the troops in that tan Army uniform on the newsreels at the Roslyn Movie Theater.

My parents, Jewish immigrants from the boroughs, liked Stevenson, the tall bald guy famous for having a hole in the sole of his shoe. They said, with that adult shake of the head, that he was “very smart, very smart,” which I figured meant that Ike was probably not so sharp. So when my first grade teacher asked who we were voting for I made the brainy choice and raised my right hand for Adlai, my left hand pushing my right elbow up above Joan Nordlinger’s hand waving furiously next to mine. But I privately hoped the nice man with a kindly smile on the button would win.

  After ten years at Wesleyan, John Hickenlooper found himself laid off from his first job as a geologist. So he rented a space in an empty warehouse in an empty pocket of Denver’s downtown to open a brewpub. He turned out to be a natural at the job; the pub was a huge success. In fifteen years, he blossomed from small business owner into millionaire at the helm of a string of pubs across the western United States. He was so influential in the community that, encouraged by many, he ran for mayor of Denver, essentially as a lark. And then he won.

  “There are two keys to unlocking the secrets of American politics and American political history.” So begins The Politicians & the Egalitarians, Princeton historian Sean Wilentz’s bold new work of history.

First, America is built on an egalitarian tradition. At the nation’s founding, Americans believed that extremes of wealth and want would destroy their revolutionary experiment in republican government. Ever since, that idea has shaped national political conflict and scored major egalitarian victories―from the Civil War and Progressive eras to the New Deal and the Great Society―along the way.

Second, partisanship is a permanent fixture in America, and America is the better for it. Every major egalitarian victory in United States history has resulted neither from abandonment of partisan politics nor from social movement protests but from a convergence of protest and politics, and then sharp struggles led by principled and effective party politicians. There is little to be gained from the dream of a post-partisan world.

With these two insights Sean Wilentz offers a crystal-clear portrait of American history, told through politicians and egalitarians including Thomas Paine, Abraham Lincoln, and W. E. B. Du Bois―a portrait that runs counter to current political and historical thinking.

  Most of us have to “talk across the aisle” once or twice a year—when we’re seated next to our conservative out-of-town uncle at Thanksgiving, say. But millions of self- identified liberals live in cities and towns—particularly away from the East and West Coasts—where they are regularly outnumbered and outvoted by conservatives.

Justin Krebs is a political and cultural entrepreneur, strategist and writer. He is the founding director of Living Liberally, a national progressive social organization with over 200 chapters. The organization is primarily composed of Drinking Liberally happy hours, which give liberals around the country the opportunity to get offline and form face-to-face friendships.

Krebs' new book is Blue in a Red State: The Survival Guide to Life in the Real America.

  A rose is a rose is a rose, but is a superdelegate a delegate?

In today’s Congressional Corner, New York representative Sean Patrick Maloney talks Democratic politics with WAMC’s Alan Chartock. 

    Cory Booker made headlines in 2002 when, at the age of 32, he became one of the youngest people to run for mayor of Newark. Though he lost that first race, Booker went on to be the city's mayor from 2006-2013, before becoming a U.S. Senator representing New Jersey.

The former Stanford football player joins us this morning to talk about his political career so far, his endorsement of Hillary Clinton, his new book, "United: Thoughts on Finding Common Ground and Advancing the Common Good," and what he thinks it will take to get both sides of the aisle working together.

  In Exit Right: The People Who Left the Left and Reshaped the American Century, Daniel Oppenheimer tells the stories of six major political figures whose journeys away from the left reshaped the contours of American politics in the twentieth century.

By going deep into the minds of six apostates—Whittaker Chambers, James Burnham, Ronald Reagan, Norman Podhoretz, David Horowitz, and Christopher Hitchens—Oppenheimer offers an unusually intimate history of the American left, and the right’s reaction.

  Former Senator Gary Hart’s The Republic of Conscience is a meditation on the growing gap between the founding principles of the United States Constitution and our current political landscape.

  A dancer’s past. A woman’s future. The seductive and lucrative world of strip clubs sets the stage for Naked Influence, a tale about a charismatic exotic dancer who finds herself engulfed in a doomed relationship with a congressman.

The show opened at Capital Repertory Theatre in downtown Albany and runs through February 14th.

The favorite of last year’s NEXT ACT! New Play Summit 3, Naked Influence showcases author Suzanne Bradbeer’s intelligence in examining contemporary stories ripped from the headlines.

Robert Newman plays Dennis, a congressman with a heart of stone. Newman is familiar from a 28-year run as Joshua Lewis on the longest running program in broadcast history, Guiding Light. A two-time Daytime Emmy Award nominee, Newman recently guest starred on Homeland, Criminal Minds, NCIS, and Law and Order: SVU. He has an extensive off-Broadway and regional theatre resume.

  Tom Daschle and Trent Lott are two of the most prominent senators of recent time. Both served in their respective parties' leadership positions from the 1990s into the current century, and they have almost sixty years of service between them. Their congressional tenure saw the Reagan tax cuts, a deadlocked Senate, the Clinton impeachment, 9/11, and the Iraq War. Despite the tumultuous times, and despite their very real ideological differences, they have always maintained a positive working relationship, one almost unthinkable in today's hyper-partisan climate.

In their book, Crisis Point: Why We Must - and How We Can - Overcome Our Broken Politics in Washington and Across America, Daschle and Lott come together from opposite sides of the aisle to sound an alarm on the current polarization that has made governing all but impossible; never before has the people's faith in government been so dismally low. The senators itemize damaging forces--the permanent campaign, the unprecedented money, the 24/7 news cycle--and offer practical recommendations, pointing the way forward.

  E. J. Dionne's new book, Why the Right Went Wrong, offers a historical view of the right since the 1960s. Its core contention is that American conservatism and the Republican Party took a wrong turn when they adopted Barry Goldwater’s worldview during and after the 1964 campaign.

The radicalism of today’s conservatism is not the product of the Tea Party. The Tea Partiers are the true heirs to Goldwater ideology. The purity movement did more than drive moderates out of the Republican Party—it beat back alternative definitions of conservatism.

The state of the Republican party, controlled by the strictest base, is diminished. It has become white and older in a country that is no longer that. It needs to come back to life for its own health and that of the country’s, and in Why the Right Went Wrong, Dionne explains how.

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