Politics

  The Capitol Steps began in 1981 as a group of Senate staffers who set out to satirize the very people and places that employed them.

Since they began, the Capitol Steps have recorded over 30 albums, including their latest, Mock the Vote. They've been featured on NBC, CBS, ABC, and PBS, and can be heard twice a year on National Public Radio stations nationwide during their Politics Takes a Holiday radio specials.

  It’s a classic story of the American Dream. George Mitchell grew up in a working class family in Maine, experiencing firsthand the demoralizing effects of unemployment when his father was laid off from a lifelong job. But education was always a household priority, and Mitchell embraced every opportunity that came his way, eventually becoming the ranking Democrat in the Senate during the administrations of George H.W. Bush and Bill Clinton.

Mitchell looks back at his adventures in law and politics in his memoir, The Negotiator.

  For over 50 years, Ralph Nader has brought to public attention--and fought on our behalf against--the reckless influence of corporations on government. Political parties have a nasty habit of slipping issues off the table. Ralph Nader has strategies for putting them back on that he'll share with attendees of the "Getting It Done: How to Restore and Repair Our Wounded Democracy" conference at The Rowe Center in Rowe, MA 5/15-5/17.

Nader's new book is Return to Sender: Unanswered Letters to the President, 2001-2015. In letters addressed to Presidents George Bush and Barack Obama, Ralph Nader provides incisive critiques of more than a decade of American policy decision and indecision.

  When Emma Sky volunteered to help rebuild Iraq after the overthrow of Saddam Hussein in 2003, she had little idea what she was getting in to. Her assignment was only supposed to last three months. She went on to serve there longer than any other senior military or diplomatic figure, giving her an unrivaled perspective of the entire conflict.

Democrats took it on the chin in the midterm elections, but are hopeful about their 2016 chances.

In today’s Congressional Corner, New York representative Paul Tonko tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock that the Empire State could play a major role in our national politics.

Barney Frank represented the Fourth Congressional District of Massachusetts for more than three decades and chaired the House Financial Services Committee from 2007 to 2011. He is a regular commentator on MSNBC.

He has just written a memoir, Frank: A Life in Politics from the Great Society to Same Sex Marriage. The book is a behind-the-scenes look at politics and larger societal changes and one man's struggle with sexual politics and identity.

    Helping students develop their ability to deliberate political questions is an essential component of democratic education, but introducing political issues into the classroom is pedagogically challenging and raises ethical dilemmas for teachers.

In their book, The Political Classroom: Evidence and Ethics in Democratic Education, Diana E. Hess and Paula McAvoy argue that teachers will make better professional judgments about these issues if they aim toward creating "political classrooms," which engage students in deliberations about questions that ask, "How should we live together?"

    In their runaway bestseller Game Change, Mark Halperin and John Heilemann captured the drama of Barack Obama’s improbable victory over the Clintons, John McCain, and Sarah Palin.

With the same reporting, unparalleled access, and narrative skill, Double Down picks up the story in the Oval Office, where the president is beset by crises both inherited and unforeseen—facing defiance from his political foes, disenchantment from the voters, disdain from the nation’s powerful money machers, and dysfunction within the West Wing.

  Rich Honen discusses how we look differently at political leaders versus business leaders. And imagines Joe as president.

  

  What happens when England’s dirtiest politician hires Shakespeare as his spin doctor?

Equivocation – a play by Bill Cain uses the English 17th century Gunpowder plot as a vehicle to demonstrate how politicians generate fear and create divisions to advance their own interests during times of crisis. Rhinebeck Theatre Society will present Equivocation for a two week run beginning on October 3rd.

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