post-traumatic stress disorder

    Trauma is a fact of life. Veterans and their families deal with the painful aftermath of combat; one in five Americans has been molested; one in four grew up with alcoholics; one in three couples have engaged in physical violence. Such experiences inevitably leave traces on minds, emotions, and even on biology. Sadly, trauma sufferers frequently pass on their stress to their partners and children.

Renowned trauma expert Bessel van der Kolk has spent over three decades working with survivors. In The Body Keeps the Score, he transforms our understanding of traumatic stress, revealing how it literally rearranges the brain’s wiring—specifically areas dedicated to pleasure, engagement, control, and trust.

Exposure to trauma doesn't necessarily dictate PTSD for the victim.

Dr. Norah Feeny, professor of psychology at Case Western Reserve University, is studying post-traumatic stress disorder to expand on our understanding of the affliction and potentially debunk some related myths.

National Institutes of Health/Wikimedia Commons Public Domain

The Veterans Administration Medical Center in Vermont is leading a national study to compare two methods of treating post-traumatic stress disorder.

NY Veterans Counseling Program Expands

May 2, 2013
Office of NYS Senator Greg Ball

A number of state and local elected officials will be on hand in New York’s Hudson Valley this afternoon to announce the expansion of a veterans counseling program.

National Institutes of Health


One of the signature lasting effects on veterans of the Iraq War is Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. WAMC's Berkshire Bureau Chief Lucas Willard reveals that PTSD not only affects those who served, but their family members as well....

Amy, a resident of the Northern Berkshires is married to a veteran who served in Iraq from 2005 to 2006, and was redeployed for Afghanistan from 2010 to 2011. Amy, who asked to keep her last name anonymous, said that when her husband returned from war the first time in 2006, she noticed his behavior had changed.

The State University of New York at New Paltz will host the ninth annual conference of the Institute for Disaster Mental Health tomorrow. The conference is focused on maintaining resilience among trauma and disaster workers.

Among the keynote speakers are Dr. Richard Tedeschi, a professor of psychology at the University of North Carolina-Charlotte, and Dr. Charles Figley, professor of social work at Tulane University. WAMC’s Brian Shields spoke with both men about how those who work around disaster maintain mental fitness.