primate

The Roundtable
11:35 am
Fri May 3, 2013

Jane Goodall

    As a young woman, Jane Goodall was best known for her groundbreaking fieldwork with the chimpanzees of Gombe, Africa. Goodall's work has always been controversial, mostly because she broke the mold of research scientist by developing meaningful relationships with her "specimens" and honoring their lives as she would other humans.

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The Roundtable
11:12 am
Fri May 3, 2013

"The Bonobo and the Atheist: In Search of Humanism Among the Primates" by Frans de Waal

    For many years, Frans de Waal has observed chimpanzees soothe distressed neighbors and bonobos share their food. In The Bonobo and the Atheist: In Search of Humanism Among the Primates, he delivers fascinating fresh evidence for the seeds of ethical behavior in primate societies that further cements the case for the biological origins of human fairness. Interweaving vivid tales from the animal kingdom with thoughtful philosophical analysis, de Waal seeks a bottom-up explanation of morality that emphasizes our connection with animals.

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The Roundtable
10:35 am
Fri May 3, 2013

"Between Man and Beast" by Monte Reel

  The mostly forgotten explorer Paul du Chaillu introduced the world to gorillas. His methods were attacked and his work discredited during his lifetime, but he also experienced fame and redemption.

Author Monte Reel illuminates the little-known tale of the 19th century explorer in his new book Between Between Man and Beast: An Unlikely Explorer, the Evolution Debates, and the African Adventure that Took the Victorian World by Storm.

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The Roundtable
10:10 am
Fri May 3, 2013

"The Girl With No Name: The Incredible True Story of a Child Raised by Monkeys" by Marina Chapman

    In 1954, in a remote mountain village in South America, a little girl was abducted. She was four years old. Marina Chapman was stolen from her housing estate and then abandoned deep in the Colombian jungle. That she survived is a miracle. Two days later, half-drugged, terrified, and starving, she came upon a troop of capuchin monkeys. Acting entirely on instinct, she tried to do what they did: she ate what they ate and copied their actions, and little by little, learned to fend for herself.

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The Roundtable
9:00 am
Fri May 3, 2013

5/3/13 - Panel

    

  Today's panalists are WAMC's Ray Graf and author of Nim Chimpsky: The Chimp Who Would Be Human, Elizabeth Hess. Joe Donahue moderates.

Today, the entirety of The Roundtable is dedicated to primate coverage, assorted segments about monkeys and apes.