pro-choice

  Forty years after the landmark Roe v. Wade ruling, “abortion” is still a word that is said with outright hostility by many, despite the fact that one in three American women will have terminated at least one pregnancy by menopause. Even those who support a woman’s right to an abortion often qualify their support by saying abortion is a “bad thing,” an “agonizing decision,” making the medical procedure so remote and radioactive that it takes it out of the world of the everyday, turning an act that is normal and necessary into something shameful and secretive.

In Pro, Katha Pollitt takes on the personhood argument, reaffirms the priority of a woman’s life and health, and discusses why terminating a pregnancy can be a force for good for women, families, and society. The book is out in paperback.

  Once vilified by pro-life and pro-choice supporters alike, Aspen Baker has shown that “pro-voice” might be the best method to move past conflict and hatred around abortion.

With her nonprofit, Exhale, she has demonstrated that it’s possible to get people talking respectfully even about the most polarizing topics.

Her new book is Pro-Voice: How To Keep Listening When The World Wants A Fight.

  In June 2013, Texas State Senator Wendy Davis was introduced to the world as a hero to women and the men who love them. Davis stood and spoke on the floor of the state senate for nearly thirteen hours to run out the clock on a sweeping bill that aimed to close all but five women’s health clinics providing access to abortion and lifesaving healthcare in Texas.

During that time, she wasn’t allowed to eat, drink, sit, use the bathroom, speak off-topic, or lean against any furniture. When it was over, everyone from the White House to young women in small Texas towns shared her story. With calls, rallies on the steps of the Texas Capitol, Twitter, Facebook and a host of social media, Wendy Davis—with her pink sneakers—suddenly became a national household name.

As reported this weekend in the New York Times, Governor Andrew Cuomo is set to propose changes to the state’s policies on abortion as part of his ‘Women’s Equality Act’ introduced during his State of the State Address that include allow health care practitioners, not solely physicians, from performing the procedure.