psychology

The Roundtable
10:40 am
Thu September 12, 2013

"The Gift of Adversity" By Dr. Norman Rosenthal

    Adversity is an irreducible fact of life. Although we can and should learn from all experiences, both positive and negative, bestselling author Dr. Norman E. Rosenthal, believes that adversity is by far the best teacher most of us will ever encounter.

Whether the adversity one experiences is the result of poor decision-making, a desire to test one’s mettle, or plain bad luck, Rosenthal believes life’s most important lessons—from the value of family to the importance of occasionally cutting corners—can be best learned from it. He writes about it in his book, The Gift of Adversity: The Unexpected Benefits of Life's Difficulties, Setbacks, and Imperfections.

The Roundtable
10:35 am
Wed September 11, 2013

"The Trauma Of Everyday Life" By Mark Epstein

    Trauma does not just happen to a few unlucky people; it is the bedrock of our psychology. Death and illness touch us all, but even the everyday sufferings of loneliness and fear are traumatic.

In The Trauma of Everyday Life renowned psychiatrist and author of Thoughts Without a Thinker Mark Epstein uncovers the transformational potential of trauma, revealing how it can be used for the mind’s own development.

The Roundtable
11:12 am
Thu August 15, 2013

"America’s Obsessives" by Joshua Kendall

    

  In this segment we explore the compulsive energy that built a nation. Joshua Kendall puts many American icons on the psychologist's couch in America’s Obsessives.

In this fascinating look at the arc of American history through the lens of compulsive behavior, he shows how some of our nation's greatest achievements-from the Declaration of Independence to the invention of the iPhone-have roots in the disappointments and frustrations of early childhood.

Starting with the obsessive natures of some of Silicon Valley's titans, including Steve Jobs, Kendall moves on to profile seven iconic figures, such as founding father Thomas Jefferson, licentious librarian Melvil Dewey, condiment kingpin H. J. Heinz, slugger Ted Williams, and Estee Lauder.

The Roundtable
10:35 am
Tue May 14, 2013

Michael Thompson

    Berkshire Country Day School and the Berkshires Hills Regional School District present an evening with Michael G. Thompson, Ph.D. at 7 pm on Wednesday May 15th at Berkshire Country Day School.

In his work, Dr. Thompson has explored the emotional lives of boys, friendships and social cruelty in childhood, the impact of summer camp experiences on child development, the tensions that arise in the parent-teacher relationships, and psychological aspects of school leadership. His latest book Homesick and Happy: How Time Away From Parents Can Help a Child Grow.

The Roundtable
11:15 am
Fri May 10, 2013

Carol Gilligan at the Rowe Center

    When Carol Gilligan published her 1982 groundbreaking book In a Different Voice, enormous attention was directed to her conclusion: men and women silence parts of themselves to remain true to their gender. Many failed to notice her pioneering techniques of listening.

The "aha" moment had occurred when a woman asked, "Do you want to know what I think – or what I really think?" Carol wondered, “How do people come to think in ways different from how they really think? What voices do people keep silent? How can I hear what is hidden?”

Carol Gilligan joins us to discuss her upcoming program - "Deep Listening: How to Hear the Voices that People Often Keep Silent" taking place May 17–19th at the Rowe Camp and Conference Center in Rowe, MA.

The Roundtable
11:12 am
Fri March 1, 2013

"Blindspot: Hidden Biases of Good People" with Anthony Greenwald

    Psychologist from the University of Washington, Anthony Greenwald, joins us to discuss the hidden biases we all carry from a lifetime of exposure to cultural attitudes about age, gender, race, ethnicity, religion, social class, sexuality, disability status, and nationality.

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Science
9:51 am
Thu January 17, 2013

"The Myths of Happiness" by Sonja Lyubomirsky

    The new book, The Myths of Happiness: What Should Make You Happy, but Doesn't, What Shouldn't Make You Happy, but Does, isolates the major turning points of adult life, looking to both achievements and failures to reveal that our misconceptions about the impact of such events is perhaps the greatest threat to our long-term well-being.

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The Roundtable
9:45 am
Tue December 11, 2012

"The Introvert’s Way" by Sophia Dembling

Sophia Dembling used to wonder if she was a "coldhearted snob." She often felt reluctant to go to parties, was very selective with whom she spent time with, hated talking on the phone, and often liked to just be alone.

But when she started learning about introversion a few years ago, she realized that there wasn't a thing wrong with her. The more she learned about being an introvert, the more comfortable she was with it and with herself.

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Science & Technology
12:20 pm
Thu July 26, 2012

Researchers Say Daydreaming Aids High Function Brain Activity

A recently released study says that daydreaming may actually be beneficial to high-level brain activity. WAMC’s Melissa Bunning reports.…

Contrary to popular belief, our brains are functioning at higher levels when our minds wander.  Dr. Jonathan Schooler of the University of California, Santa Barbara, explains……

Schooler, and Kalina Christoff of the University of British Columbia, took functional magnetic resonance images, or fMRI scans, of subjects as they were instructed to press a button when numbers appeared on a screen.

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