ptsd

  In It Didn't Start With You: How Inherited Family Trauma Shapes Who We Are and How to End the Cycle, Mark Wolynn, director of the Family Constellation Institute and creator of the Core Language Approach, shows how the traumas of our parents, grandparents, and great grandparents can live in our anxious words, fears, behaviors and unexplained physical symptoms—what scientists are now calling inherited family trauma, or “secondary PTSD.”

Even if the person who suffered the original trauma has died, or the story has been forgotten or silenced, memory and feelings can live on. These emotional legacies are often hidden, encoded in everything from gene expression to everyday language, and they play a far greater role in our emotional and physical health than has ever before been understood.

Mark Wolynn is a leading expert on inherited family trauma. As the director of The Family Constellation Institute in San Francisco, he trains clinicians and treats people struggling with depression, anxiety, panic disorder, obsessive thoughts, self-injury, chronic pain, and illness.

  The new opera The Long Walk is based on Brian Castner’s critically acclaimed book of the same name. The opera is a deeply personal exploration of a soldier’s return from Iraq where he served as an officer in an Explosive Ordnance Disposal unit and his battle with what he calls “the Crazy” as he tries to reintegrate into his family life upon returning from the war.

Opera Saratoga at the Spa Little Theatre is presenting the world premiere of The Long Walk in partnership with American Lyric Theater. Internationally renowned theater and opera director David Schweizer makes his Opera Saratoga debut.

Grammy Award winning baritone Daniel Belcher returns to Opera Saratoga to create the role of Brian, alongside mezzo-soprano Heather Johnson, who makes her company debut as his wife Jessie. The two performers join us for this interview.

  We are very happy to continue our regular feature – Ideas Matter: Checking in with the Public Humanities.

Today we check in with the Vermont Humanities Council and a speaker in their First Wednesdays lecture series. Dr. Edward Tick, director of the Soldier’s Heart Clinic, will be talking about "The Human face of War: Combat, Healing, and the Humanities" on Wednesday, April 1 at 7pm at the Goodrich Memorial Library in Newport, Vermont. Dr. Tick explores the inner world of combat, the universal dimensions of veterans’ wounding, and a philosophy of healing combat’s consequences—recognizing that while war most directly affects veterans, it wounds us all.

Dr. Edward Tick joins us now along with Sylvia Plumb, Director of Communications for Vermont Humanities.

Lucas Willard / WAMC

Law enforcement officials from across the region gathered in Saratoga Springs to take part in a course designed to help police recognize and assist officers and families cope with loss and mental illness.

WAMC

The public had a last chance on Veterans Day to see a limited showing of photographs taken by combat veterans on display at the Wood Museum of Springfield History in Springfield, Massachusetts.         

Everyone agrees that our troops deserve a return to productive and creative lives after service. Yet, in spite of billions spent on psychological care and reintegration programs, we face an epidemic of combat-related conditions like PTSD. What's the solution? In Warrior's Return, Dr. Edward Tick reveals what's missing in our approach to helping our veterans acclimate from the battlefield to civilian live.

    The Mental Health Foundation will honor award-winning TV journalist Bob Woodruff at its annual August Evening in Saratoga, Monday August 18 at the Saratoga National Golf Course.

Woodruff, whose miraculous recovery from traumatic brain injury suffered while on assignment for ABC TV in Iraq in 2006, will be recognized for his outstanding work with the Bob Woodruff Foundation. The Bob Woodruff Foundation helps returning veterans address their life challenges, including mental health issues.

Facebook: Run To Home Base

Money raised from a run this weekend in Boston will benefit an organization that cares for post-9/11 veterans and their families. The fifth annual Run to Home Base takes place this Saturday in Boston.

Exposure to trauma doesn't necessarily dictate PTSD for the victim.

Dr. Norah Feeny, professor of psychology at Case Western Reserve University, is studying post-traumatic stress disorder to expand on our understanding of the affliction and potentially debunk some related myths.

Defense.gov

Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel says he is personally looking into the lawsuit filed earlier this week by Vietnam veterans who suffered from post-traumatic stress and received less than honorable discharges from the military.

wikipedia.org

A federal lawsuit accuses the U.S. military of failing to upgrade the discharges of Vietnam veterans who developed post-traumatic stress disorder and seeks relief for them.

The lawsuit was filed Monday in Connecticut by five Vietnam veterans and three veterans organizations. The veterans say they suffered PTSD before it was recognized and were discharged under other-than-honorable conditions that made them ineligible for benefits.

"Theater of War" is a public health project, having produced hundreds of dramatic readings of Greek tragedies for mixed civilian and military audiences to start a conversation about the return of soldiers to civilian life.

Vassar College in Poughkeepsie, NY is hosting "Theater of War" for a dramatic reading of scenes from Sophocles' "Ajax" on Sunday, Nov. 3rd from 4:00-6:00p in the Vassar Chapel in association with the Vassar College Department of Greek and Roman Studies.

Bryan Doerries is the Founder and Artistic Director of “Theater of War” and he joins us to tell us more.

    As a SEAL and combat medic, Mark Donald served his country with valorous distinction for almost twenty-five years and survived some of the most dangerous combat actions imaginable.

His new book, Battle Ready: Memoir of a SEAL Warrior Medic, immerses the reader in the unique life of the elite warrior-medic and describes his triumph over Post Traumatic Stress Disorder that threatened to destroy him and his family.

  Dan New is a combat Vietnam Veteran and an artist who loves to write and photograph as expression of his life.

  Suicide, especially among veterans, is an emerging crisis.

In today’s Congressional Corner, New York Representative Chris Gibson — a Republican from the 19th district — tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock that suicide can tear families apart. 

  Robert Crais is the author of the best-selling Elvis Cole novels and was the 2006 recipient of the Ross Macdonald Literary Award.

His latest novel, Suspect, tells the story of Scott and Maggie - an LAPD K9 team nobody trusts--damaged goods who are wounded, scared, and suspect. Who work together to solve a murder and regain trust.

  The Big Read is a month-long series of programs that brings together an entire community to read and discuss a single book. This November, The Big Read comes to Albany with the book The Things They Carried by Tim O'Brien and includes an assortment of book discussions, films, performances, and exhibitions.

Rob Edelman: War Is Hell, Indeed

Nov 5, 2012

In so many Hollywood films of yesteryear, American soldiers and war veterans-- particularly those of the World War II era-- are depicted as valiant, well-adjusted warriors who have fought for their country. They smile, even if they are wounded. Upon coming home, they are ever-willing to be embraced by their loved ones while disappearing into the mainstream and getting on with their lives.

Brian Castner served three tours of duty in the Middle East, two of them as the commander of an Explosive Ordnance Disposal unit in Iraq. We speak with him about his book, The Long Walk: A Story of War and the Life That Follows.