pulitzer

  Annie Proulx is the author of ten books, including the novel, The Shipping News and the short story, Brokeback Mountain.

Her new novel, Barkskins, imagines the forging of a new world through humanity’s insatiable appetite for timber and through two families intertwined in the early onslaught of modern global deforestation.

  Pulitzer-Prize winning novelist Richard Russo is one of America’s most celebrated fiction writers, as well as an acclaimed screenwriter and memoirist.

His new novel, Everybody’s Fool, is a sequel to his novel Nobody’s Fool, which revisits the upstate New York setting and characters of that highly-praised novel. 

  Pulitzer Prize winning author Elizabeth Strout’s bestselling novels Olive Kitteridge  and The Burgess Boys  have illuminated our most tender relationships.

Now, in My Name Is Lucy Barton, she shows how a simple hospital visit becomes a portal to the most tender relationship of all—the one between mother and daughter.

  Adam Johnson is a winner of the Pulitzer Prize for his acclaimed novel about North Korea, The Orphan Master’s Son.

Johnson’s new book - Fortune Smiles – is a collection of stories that gives voice to the perspectives we don’t often hear, while offering a new way of looking at the world. The collection was just named a National Book Award finalist.

Dirty Sugar Photography

  The CENTER for Performing Arts at Rhinebeck will present Alice Ripley in concert this Saturday at their annual gala. Jennifer Damiano will join her.

The Tony-Award winning actress is a true Broadway icon whose credits include the original casts of The Who’s Tommy, Sunset Boulevard, Side Show, and the Pulitzer Prize winning musical, Next to Normal (for which she won her Tony Award).

We speak with her here about those shows and more.

  With his best seller The Working Poor, Pulitzer Prize winner and former New York Times veteran David Shipler cemented his place among our most trenchant social commentators. Now he turns his incisive reporting to a critical American ideal: freedom of speech.

Measured yet sweeping his new book, Freedom of Speech, brilliantly reveals the triumphs and challenges of defining and protecting the boundaries of free expression in modern America.

  Two-time Pulitzer winner, New York Times-bestselling author, and master historian David McCullough brings to life two of the most iconic figures in American history in his new book, The Wright Brothers.

Regarded by many in their times as mere “bicycle mechanics,” Wilbur and Orville Wright were in reality self-taught geniuses of truly exceptional capacity of mind, pioneering scientific explorers, and the men who taught the world how to fly.

David McCullough won Pulitzers for his biographies, Truman and John Adams. He is the recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation’s highest civilian award.

This is an “Off the Shelf” edition of the Book Show in partnership with Northshire Bookstore in Saratoga Springs, NY and recorded before a live audience.

Williamstown resident Elizabeth Kolbert won a Pulitzer Prize Monday for her latest book. Kolbert’s The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History won the Pulitzer for general nonfiction.

4/21/15 Panel

Apr 21, 2015

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, SUNY Albany Journalism Professor and Investigative Professor, Rosemary Armao, and essayist, author, editor and activist - Barbara Smith.

Scheduled topics include: EU Migrant Crisis; Baltimore Arrest Spinal Cord Death; Breast Cancer Numbers; Standardized Testing; 2015 Pulitzer Prizes.

  Richard Rhodes is the Pulitzer Prize–winning and bestselling author of The Making of the Atomic Bomb.

His new book, Hell and Good Company: The Spanish Civil War and the World it Made, tells the remarkable story of the Spanish Civil War through the eyes of the reporters, writers, artists, doctors, and nurses who witnessed it.

  In The Return of George Washington: 1783-1789, Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Edward J. Larson recovers a crucially important—yet almost always overlooked—chapter of George Washington’s life, revealing how Washington saved the United States by coming out of retirement to lead the Constitutional Convention and serve as our first president.

  Founded in 2009 by Brad Wells, Roomful of Teeth is a vocal ensemble committed to exploring the full potential of the human voice through study with masters from non-classical traditions all over the world. They won a Grammy Award last year for their self-titled album.

They are having a busy week! Roomful of Teeth will be performing at Proctors in Schenectady, followed by the last leg of an extended residency at Williams College and a visit to the The Long Trail School in Dorset, VT. They will perform at Proctors on 2/11 and at Williams College on 2/13.

Their concert at Proctors will contain the first Capital Region performance of “Partita” – the Pulitzer prize winning piece by composer and Roomful of Teeth member, Caroline Shaw. At Williams they will be premiering a work that was written for them and the Williams Concert Choir.

Tom Killips

  Becca and Howie Corbett have everything a family could want, until a life-shattering accident turns their world upside down and leaves the couple drifting perilously apart.

The play, Rabbit Hole, by David Lindsay Abaire, charts Becca and Howie’s bittersweet search for comfort in the darkest of places and for a path that will lead them back into the light of day.

Rabbit Hole won the 2007 Pulitzer Prize for Drama and a production of the play opens this Friday night produced by the Schenectady Civic Players.

Amy Lane plays Becca and she joins us now.

  

  Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist Jeffrey Eugenides (The Virgin Suicides, Middlesex, The Marriage Plot) has been called a “great American writer” (Los Angeles Times Book Review) and “a master of voice” (Washington Post).

Eugenides will deliver the annual William Gifford Lecture at Vassar College in Poughkeepsie, NY on Tuesday, October 28, at 6 pm in the Villard Room of Main Building. Sponsored by the English Department and the William Gifford Fund for Writers-in-Residence, this lecture is free and open to the public. 

  Two-time Pulitzer Prize winner and New York Times columnist Nicholas D. Kristof is often called the "reporter's reporter" for his human rights advocacy and his efforts to give a voice to the voiceless. He will give the 2014 MCLA Hardman Lecture on Thursday, October 16 at 7 pm in the MCLA Amsler Campus Center gymnasium.

  Doris Kearns Goodwin—the bestselling, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of No Ordinary Time and Team of Rivals—brings her blend of scholarship, intellectual rigor and riveting storytelling to the turbulent and fateful relationship between two presidents, the rise of muckraking journalism, and the far-reaching ferment of the Progressive Era.

Her best-selling book The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism is out this week in paperback.

 

Over his extensive career, Tracy Kidder has written some enormously popular books including his Pulitzer Prize and National Book of the Year award winning The Soul of a New Machine. Other bestsellers include Among Schoolchildren, Old Friends, and My Detachment. He has also written extensively about this region in his classic books: House and Home Town.

    John Patrick Shanley is a Pulitzer Prize and Tony Award winning playwright, Oscar winning screenwriter, and theatre and film director. His works include Moonstruck, Joe Versus the Volcano, Welcome to The Moon, Savage in Limbo, Outside Mullingar, Doubt: A Parable - for stage, the title shortened to Doubt when it was adapted to film.

His new play, The Danish Widow, opens tonight in the Hallie Flanagan-Davis Powerhouse Theatre on the Vassar College campus in Poughkeepsie, NY. It’s the third mainstage show of the New York Stage and Film summer season.

  One of New Jersey’s seemingly innumerable quiet seaside towns, Toms River became the unlikely setting for a decades-long drama that culminated in 2001 with one of the largest legal settlements in the annals of toxic dumping. A town that would rather have been known for its Little League World Series champions ended up making history for an entirely different reason: a notorious cluster of childhood cancers scientifically linked to local air and water pollution.

For years, large chemical companies had been using Toms River as their private dumping ground, burying tens of thousands of leaky drums in open pits and discharging billions of gallons of acid-laced wastewater into the town’s namesake river.

The story is told in Dan Fagin's book, Toms River: A Story of Science and Salvation - winner of the 2014 Pulitzer Prize for General Nonfiction.

4/15/14 Panel

Apr 15, 2014

    

  Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, and Associate Editor of the Times Union, Mike Spain.

Topics include:
Spring flooding
Ukraine
Middle East
Pulitzer
TU Stories

    Pulitzer Prize-winning author Paul Harding returns with a follow-up to 2009's Tinkers. This time, Harding builds his story around the grandson of Tinkers protagonist, George Crosby.

In Enon: A Novel, Harding follows a year in the life of Charlie Crosby as he tries to come to terms with a shattering personal tragedy.

    Cuban-American novelist, Oscar Hijuelos died this weekend at the age of 62. His book, The Mambo Kings Play Songs of Love was a best seller and earned him the Pulitzer for fiction in 1990 - making him the first Hispanic to earn that prize.

We spoke with Hijuelos on The Book Show in 2010 on the occasion of the publication of Beautiful Maria of My Soul – his 20 years-later muse-twin follow-up to Mambo Kings.

  After eight commanding works of fiction, Pulitzer Prize winner Richard Russo now turns to memoir in a hilarious, moving, and always surprising account of his life, his parents, and the upstate New York town they all struggled variously to escape.

Anyone familiar with Richard Russo's acclaimed novels will recognize Gloversville - once famous for producing gloves and anything else made of leather. This is where the author grew up, the only son of an aspirant mother and a charming, feckless father who were born into this close-knit community. But by the time of his childhood in the 1950s, prosperity was replaced by poverty and illness (often tannery-related), with everyone barely scraping by.

    Standing on the weatherworn shores of the Alaskan coast, Pulitzer Prize winning author Philip Caputo watched Eskimo schoolchildren pledge allegiance to the same flag as the children of Cuban immigrants in Key West, six thousand miles away, and began to wonder: How does the United States, as diverse as it is large, remain united?

In 2011, in a nation mired in war abroad and rocked by the greatest economic calamity since the Great Depression, Caputo loaded his wife and two English setters into an Airstream camper and hit the open road in search of answers.

Captuo’s The Longest Road: Overland in Search of America from Key West to the Arctic Ocean follows the epic 4 month road trip that lead the couple down country roads, meeting Americans from all walks of life.

Philip Caputo is a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and the author of many works of fiction and nonfiction, including A Rumor of War.

    In Beyond War: Reimagining American Influence in a New Middle East, Pulitzer Prize winning journalist David Rohde distills eleven years of expert reporting into a call for change.

An incisive look at the evolving nature of war, Rohde exposes how a dysfunctional Washington squandered billions on contractors in Iraq and Afghanistan, neglected its true allies in the war on terror and failed to employ its most potent nonmilitary weapons.

  The African American Cultural Center of the Capital Region is committed to educating, enriching, and empowering residents of the Capital Region through a variety of programs that raise the collective consciousness of all ethnicities to the rich and vibrant history, contribution, and culture of African Americans.

This Thursday, April 18th, The African American Cultural Center of the Capital Region will hold a Gala fundraiser in the Swyer Theater at The Egg in Albany, New York.

The evening will include performances of scenes from A Soldier's Play, by Pulitzer Prize winning playwright, Charles H. Fuller, a conversation with -and award presentation to- Fuller – and more.

    Pulitzer Prize-winner Junot Díaz’s first book, Drown, established him as a major new writer. His first novel, The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, won the Pulitzer Prize. His latest, This Is How You Lose Her, features nine stories. At the center of each - is Yunior, a Dominican American who, despite his macho exterior, aches to be loved and the book explores the haunting, impossible power of love.

Diaz will be at Bard College on Monday, April 1st.

   Enemies: A History of the FBI is the first definitive history of the FBI’s secret intelligence operations, from an author whose work on the Pentagon and the CIA won him the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award.

We think of the FBI as America’s police force. But secret intelligence is the Bureau’s first and foremost mission. Enemies is the story of how presidents have used the FBI as the most formidable intelligence force in American history.

Here is the hidden history of America’s hundred-year war on terror. As a correspondent for The New York Times, Tim Weiner he covered the Central Intelligence Agency in Washington and terrorism in Afghanistan, Pakistan, the Sudan, and other nations. Enemies is his fourth book. Weiner will be speaking tomorrow at the Carey Center for Global Good in Rensselaerville.

    In 1973 in the offices of The Atlantic Monthly in Boston, a young freelance writer named Tracy Kidder came looking for an assignment. Richard Todd was the editor that encouraged him.

After much success they have written the new book, Good Prose: The Art of Nonfiction, which explores three major non-fiction forms: narratives, essays, and memoirs.

    Stephen Hunter is a former Pulitzer Prize-winning film critic for The Washington Post and best-selling novelist.

His new novel, The Third Bullet, has his recurring hero, Bob Lee Swagger, question details of what happened in shooting death of JFK.

Hunter has written 18 novels — eight of them featuring Swagger, a former Marine sniper.

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