punk

  Garth Risk Hallberg's debut novel, City on Fire, was named one of the best books of 2015 by The Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, San Francisco Chronicle, The Wall Street Journal, NPR, and Vogue.

City on Fire is set in New York City and spans a seven month period between New Year’s Eve 1976 through the city’s blackouts in July of 1977. The story revolves around a varied web of characters—two estranged heirs to one of the city’s great fortunes; two suburban teenagers involved in Manhattan’s punk scene; a magazine reporter; and a detective—whose lives interconnect around a shooting in Central Park.

Hallberg will read from his bestselling debut novel today at Page Hall on the University at Albany’s downtown campus at 8 p.m. At 4:15 p.m. the author will hold an informal seminar in the Assembly Hall, on UAlbany’s uptown campus. Free and open to the public, the events are sponsored by the New York State Writers Institute

Literature has a long history of posthumous diaries, some of which changed the world and others of which languished in anonymity. Thanks to co-authors Gillian McCain and Legs McNeil, the late Mary Rose is getting her due.

Before punk rock and CBGBs, before heroin and cocaine, Richard Hell was Richard Meyers, the son of a university psychologist in Kentucky with an advanced intellect and tendency toward destruction — two traits that would help him define an artistic era in the years to come.

Tony Fletcher, a writer now living in the Hudson Valley, shares an origin story with many of the British rockers he has spent a lifetime chronicling: modest beginnings on sometimes rough London streets, a single-parent home, an early obsession with records, band trivia, and ear-thumping shows.