Racism

Min Jin Lee’s historical novel, Pachinko, spans the entire 20th century through four generations, three wars and two countries with a troubled past.

The novel is a moving and powerful account of one of the world’s most persecuted immigrant communities—Koreans living in Japan. 

A protestor From Buffalo displays an antti-Carl Paladino poster May 17, 2017 on the steps to the State Education Building In Albany.
WAMC photo by Dave Lucas

Activists from Western New York demonstrated Wednesday at the New York State Education Department building in Albany. The group had hoped to confront the State Education Commissioner to demand Carl Paladino be kicked off the Buffalo Board of Education.  But MaryEllen Elia was out of town.

In How May I Help You?: An Immigrant's Journey from MBA to Minimum Wage, Deepak Singh chronicles his downward mobility as an immigrant to a small town in Virginia. Armed with an MBA from India, Singh can get only a minimum-wage job in an electronics store. Every day he confronts unfamiliar American mores, from strange idioms to deeply entrenched racism.

Greg Iles’ Natchez trilogy has been compared to Faulkner and Conroy – the greatest Southern Gothic writers.

The themes in the trilogy include race issues in the south, past and present, the legacy of a father, small town relationships and unattainable love. The culmination of the trilogy, Mississippi Blood, is now out. 

Commissioner of the Federal Bureau of Narcotics from its establishment in 1930 until his retirement in 1962, Harry Anslinger is the United States’ little known first drug czar. Anslinger was a profligate propagandist with a flair for demonizing racial and immigrant groups and perhaps best known for his zealous pursuit of harsh drug penalties and his particular animus for marijuana users.

But what made Anslinger who he was, and what cultural trends did he amplify and institutionalize? In her book, Assassin of Youth, Alexandra Chasin looks to answer those questions and explore Anslinger’s social, cultural, and political legacy.

Alexandra Chasin is associate professor of literary studies at Eugene Lang College, the New School. 

At the end of Mark Twain’s masterwork, Huckleberry Finn declares that he plans to “light out for the Territory” to avoid getting “sivilized.”

For 130-plus years, readers have been left guessing about the adventures in the West. But now, Huck is back, thanks to prize-winning novelist Robert Coover. His novel is Huck Out West.

New York State Of Hate

Feb 21, 2017
WAMC composite image by Dave Lucas

The Southern Poverty Law Center is out with an updated version of its "Hate Map." The group ranks New York state fourth in the nation for the number of active hate groups.

In the spring of 1942, the United States rounded up 120,000 residents of Japanese ancestry living along the West Coast and sent them to interment camps for the duration of World War II. Many abandoned their land. Many gave up their personal property. Each one of them lost a part of their lives.

Amazingly, the government hired famed photographers Dorothea Lange, Ansel Adams, and others to document the expulsion--from assembling Japanese Americans at racetracks to confining them in ten camps spread across the country. Their photographs, exactly seventy-five years after the evacuation began, give an emotional, unflinching portrait of a nation concerned more about security than human rights. These photographs are more important than ever.

Nick Cave "Until" at MASS MoCA
Sarah LaDuke


  Nick Cave is an American fabric sculptor, dancer, and performance artist. He is best known for his Soundsuits: wearable fabric sculptures that are bright, whimsical, and otherworldly.

In his new work, “Until,” Cave uses MASS MoCA’s football field-sized space to create his largest installation to date, made up of thousands of found objects and millions of beads, which will make viewers feel as if they have entered a sensory tapestry, like stepping directly inside the belly of one of his iconic Soundsuits.

For the piece Nick Cave and his curators and assistants have gathered 16,000 wind spinners; millions of plastic pony beads; thousands of ceramic birds, fruits, and animals; 1 crocodile; 17 cast-iron lawn jockeys -- and so much more.

We visited MASS MoCA during the installation of “Until” - which opened on October 15th and will be on view in North Adams, MA through early September of next year.

Nick Cave and curator Denise Markonish lead us through the exhibition.


  Charles Dew, one of America’s most respected historians of the South, will tell us about his powerful memoir - The Making of a Racist: A Southerner Reflects on Family, History, and the Slave Trade.

He turns the focus on his own life, which began not in the halls of enlightenment but in a society unequivocally committed to segregation.

 

In the book, Dew re-creates the mid-century American South of his childhood--in many respects a boy’s paradise, but one stained by Lost Cause revisionism and, worse, by the full brunt of Jim Crow.

 

The second half of the book shows how this former Confederate youth and descendant of Thomas Roderick Dew, one of slavery’s most passionate apologists, went on to reject his racist upbringing and become a scholar of the South and its deeply conflicted history.

 

The centerpiece of Dew’s story is his sobering discovery of a price

Charles Dew is Ephraim Williams Professor of American History at Williams College and the author of the Fletcher Pratt Award-winning Apostles of Disunion: Southern Secession Commissioners and the Causes of the Civil War and Bond of Iron: Master and Slave at Buffalo Forge, selected as a New York Times Notable Book of the Year.

  Young black men are 21 times more likely to be killed by police than their white counterparts. The unemployment rate for African Americans has been double that of whites for more than half a century. And yet Americans cling desperately to the myth that we are living in a post-racial society, that the election of the first black president spelled doom for racist policies and racist beliefs. In fact, racist thought is alive and well in America; it has simply become more sophisticated and more insidious.

Award-winning historian Ibram X. Kendi argues in Stamped from the Beginning, if we have any hope of grappling with this stark reality, we must first understand how racist ideas were developed, disseminated, and enshrined in American society.

A public university in New York says "hashtag StopWhitePeople2K16," used as the title of a recent training session, was chosen for its irony — and the session — about diversity — wasn't anti-white.

  Countless books have been written about the civil rights movement, but far less attention has been paid to what happened after the dramatic passage of the Voting Rights Act in 1965 and the turbulent forces it unleashed. In this groundbreaking narrative history, Ari Berman charts both the transformation of American democracy under the VRA and the counterrevolution that has sought to limit it from the moment the act was signed into law.

Give Us the Ballot by Ari Berman offers the first comprehensive history of its kind, and provides new insight into one of the most vital political and civil rights issues of our time.

  In the early sixties, Calvin Trillin got his start as a journalist covering the Civil Rights Movement in the South.

Over the next five decades of reporting, he often returned to scenes of racial tension. Now, for the first time, the best of Trillin’s pieces on race in America have been collected in one volume: Jackson, 1964: And Other Dispatches from Fifty Years of Reporting on Race in America.

Two of the three University at Albany students charged with falsely reporting a racially-motivated attack on a CDTA bus in January were back in court Friday morning.

Alexis Briggs, Asha Burwell and Ariel Agudio look on as attorney Attorney Frederick Brewington speaks to reporters.
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Three former University at Albany students accused of lying about a racially-charged brawl on a CDTA bus were back on court on Wednesday.

WAMC photo by Dave Lucas

Several events that will shape the future of New York's Capital City took place in various locations across Albany Monday night.

Response to the allegations came swiftly.
WAMC Composite Photo by Dave Lucas

University at Albany students are rallying tonight following an alleged assault of three black female students on a CDTA bus over the weekend.

CDTA Bus
WAMC photo by Dave Lucas

University at Albany President Robert Jones has responded to an alleged racially-based attack on a group of students on a bus.

Angelica Clarke says BLM Upstate NY is holding a "What's Next" public town hall February 1st 6pm at at Punta Cana, 92 Second Avenue, Albany.
BLMUpstateNY/facebook

Calling on all people to join together to fight racism in upstate New York, the Black Lives Matter movement has arrived Albany. "Change" has come to the Capital.

  Over the past half-century, the U.S. has seen profound demographic and cultural change. But racial progress still seems distant. After the faith of the civil rights movement, the fervor of multiculturalism, and even the brief euphoria of a “post-racial” moment, we remain a nation divided. Resegregation is the norm.

The culture wars flare as hot as ever. How do Americans see race now? Do we see each other any more clearly than before?

In Who We Be: A Cultural History of Race in Post-Civil Rights America, Jeff Chang, the award-winning author of Can’t Stop Won’t Stop: A History of the Hip-Hop Generation, looks anew at the tumultuous half-century from the peak of the civil rights era to the colorization and strife of the Obama years.

wikipedia.org

The city of Rutland has settled a racial discrimination lawsuit filed by a former police officer for $975,000.

Pat Bradley/WAMC

The SUNY Plattsburgh Student Association held an open campus meeting last night to discuss the issues and emotions swirling in the wake of the publication of a racist cartoon on the front page of the student newspaper.  As WAMC’s North Country Bureau Chief Pat Bradley reports, an all-faculty meeting is also scheduled for this afternoon.

#RiseUpOctober

You may not yet have heard about  "Rise Up October" - it's a movement that packs a huge potential impact in our region.

Pat Bradley/WAMC

A new chapter of the NAACP held its inaugural public meeting last night in Vermont. The group is aiming for social justice in one of the nation’s whitest states.

pixabay.com

Suburban New York police officials say an officer has been placed on modified duty and is under investigation after posting a racist photo on Facebook.

Vote sign
wikipedia commons

Voting has been placed on temporary hold throughout one upstate county.

Senior U.S. Judge Lawrence Kahn ruled Tuesday Albany County diluted minority voting power in its 2011 redistricting plan. The Times Union reports Kahn has blocked county officials from proceeding with this year's legislative elections until a new plan is drafted.

Elizabeth Anderson

A new report by the Journal of the American Medical Association finds that young African-American men have better survival chances in prison than on the street because they have better access to health care. Meanwhile,  a group based in Albany is rolling out a new program to address the intersection of race, crime, criminal justice policy, and health.

3/10/15 Panel

Mar 10, 2015

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, SUNY at Albany journalism professor and investigative journalist, Rosemary Armao, and essayist, author, editor and activist - Barbara Smith.

Topics include: White House Upset Over GOP Iran Talks; Oklahoma Fraternity; Obama in Selma Reaction; Obamacare Costs Lower; Diane Rehm; Ferguson Cases.

12/30/14 Panel

Dec 30, 2014

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Associate Editor of the Times Union, Mike Spain, and political consultant Libby Post.

Topics include Afghanistan War ending, Steve Scalise of Louisiana Acknowledges Addressing Racist Group, and the ferry fire off the coast of Greece.

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