relationships

  Daniel Shapiro, Ph.D., is founder and director of the Harvard International Negotiation Program and a world-renowned expert on conflict resolution. From advising leaders of war-torn countries to working with senior executives and families in crisis, Dan has helped thousands of organizations and individuals solve the problems that divide us. Drawing on these experiences and his practice-based research, he has developed a wealth of practical approaches to amplify influence and leadership—in business, in government, and in life.

His new book is Negotiating the Nonnegotiable: How to Resolve Your Most Emotionally Charged Conflicts.

  After four decades as a reporter, Lesley Stahl’s most vivid and transformative experience of her life was not covering the White House, interviewing heads of state, or researching stories at 60 Minutes. It was becoming a grandmother.

She was hit with a jolt of joy so intense and unexpected, she wanted to “investigate” it—as though it were a news flash. And so, using her60 Minutes skills, she explored how grandmothering changes a woman’s life.

Her new book is Becoming Grandma: The Joys and Science of the New Grandparenting.

     When Clara Bensen arranged to meet Jeff Wilson on the steps of the Texas State Capital after just a few email exchanges on OkCupid, it felt like something big was going to happen. Jeff was a wildly energetic university professor with a free willing spirit, Clara, a sensitive reclusive writer just recovering from a quarter life existential breakdown.

Within a few days of knowing one another they decided to embark on a crazy travel experiment. Twenty-one days from Istanbul to London with zero luggage, zero reservations and zero plans. Based on Clara Bensen’s viral Salon.com article entitled "The Craziest OkCupid Date Ever," her new book  No Baggage: A Minimalist Tale of Love and Wandering is the story of her luggage less adventure. 

  In his new book, The Point Is: Making Sense of Birth, Death, and Everything in Between, Lee Eisenberg (bestselling author of The Number) dares to tackle nothing less than what it takes to find enduring meaning and purpose in life.

He explains how from a young age, each of us is compelled to take memories of events and relationships and shape them into a one-of-a-kind personal narrative. In addition to sharing his own memories, Eisenberg presents research culled from psychology and neuroscience, and draws on insights from a pantheon of thinkers and great writers-Tolstoy, Freud, Joseph Campbell, Virginia Woolf, among others -- as well as men and women of all ages who are wrestling with the demands of work and family, ever in search of fulfillment and satisfaction.

  Lauren Groff returns to talk about her new novel, Fates and Furies.  Groff often writes about the tension between the individual and community. This novel shrinks community to just two, a marriage. It is told in two halves, from the opposing perspectives of a relationship.

Fates and Furies illuminates all the small ways we deceive, compromise, or cramp ourselves to sustain a partnership even a happy one, and even within so much intimacy the other partner's experience is so unknowable and mysterious. 

    

        From birth to death, human beings are hardwired to connect to other human beings. Face-to-face contact matters: tight bonds of friendship and love heal us, help children learn, extend our lives, and make us happy. Looser in-person bonds matter, too, combining with our close relationships to form a personal “village” around us, one that exerts unique effects. Not just any social networks will do: we need the real, in-the-flesh encounters that tie human families, groups of friends, and communities together.

30 Lessons For Loving

Jan 20, 2015

  Based on the most detailed survey of long-married people ever conducted, 30 Lessons For Loving shows a way to lifelong, fulfilling relationships. Karl Pillemer, a gerontologist at Cornell University, offers advice from the oldest and wisest Americans on everything from finding a partner, to deciding to commit, to growing old together.

Along the way, the book answers questions like these: How do you know if the person you love is the right one? What are the secrets for improving communication and reducing conflict? What gets you through the major stresses of marriage, such as child-rearing, work, money issues, and in-laws?

    Sarah Varney is a senior correspondent with Kaiser Health News. She also reports for NPR’s science and health desk and the New York Times, Washington Post, USA Today, and McClatchy newspapers. She has reported extensively on health policy and health disparities within the public health sphere, and she has contributed multiple stories to NPR’s "Living Large," a series on how obesity is changing life in America.

In her book, XL Love: How the Obesity Crisis is Complicating America's Love Life, she travels the country and tells the personal stories of men and women who are experiencing what millions of others feel every day, along with the stories of those who are in the business of helping them: physicians, researchers, scientists, psychologists, sociologists, and more.

  Cindy Chupack has spent much of her adult life writing about dating and relationships for several hit TV series and as a sex columnist for O, The Oprah Magazine. At the age of thirty-nine, she finally found The One—and a wealth of new material.

Marriage, Cindy discovered, was more of an adventure than she ever imagined, and in this collection of essays she deftly examines the comedy and cringe-worthy aspects of matrimony. Soulful yet self-deprecating, The Longest Date recounts her first marriage (he was gay) and the meeting of Husband No. 2, Ian.

    It is always a thrill to welcome New Yorker Cartoonist Liza Donnelly to the program. She has a new book of cartoons and writing, Women on Men that is available as an e-book.

The book is a collection of over 200 of her cartoons. The theme is primarily about women being funny.

Liza Donnelly has been publishing cartoons in the New Yorker since 1982. She is also a weekly columnist and cartoonist for Forbes.com, specializing in politics and women’s rights, and for three years, Donnelly has been drawing a weekly cartoon on gender issues and women’s rights for the news site, Women’s Enews.

Far From the Tree: Parents, Children and the Search for Identity, Andrew Solomon’s book on parents, children and the bond between them and the cases of extreme difference - was published to ecstatic acclaim last year - landing on best-seller lists across the country, and "Best of" lists from The New York Times, Amazon, The Economist and more.

The book has now been released in paperback. Solomon opens Far From the Tree with an autobiographical chapter detailing his experience as a gay son of heterosexual parents. At the time of his youth, homosexuality was considered an illness and a crime. The book is about the struggle for those who are different and their need to find their own identity.