religion

Academic Minute
5:00 am
Mon March 17, 2014

Dr. Brent Plate, Hamilton College - An object lesson in religious history

People have an affinity for things.

In today’s Academic Minute, Dr. Brent Plate, visiting associate professor of religious studies at Hamilton College, examines how objects can have a rich personal significance.

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Commentary & Opinion
3:50 pm
Thu February 13, 2014

Rabbi Dan Ornstein: “Saying Grace” Over Grace After Meals

Moving from New York City to Raleigh, North Carolina upon ordination was my first serious foray out of a somewhat insular northeastern cocoon and into “real” America.  I was not exactly sheltered until then. I grew up in an ethnically diverse Queens neighborhood, and the inner city public high school I attended was a testing ground for class and racial coexistence.  Still, I thought I knew what difference was until I discovered how different difference could be in the same country, less than five hundred miles south of where I grew up.  The Raleigh and East Carolinas that I remember from the early nineteen nineties were a study in contrasts.  The city is part of an urban powerhouse of cosmopolitanism that attracts people and businesses from all over the world.  Yet it also boasts some of the world’s most rigidly conservative churches and it sits in the midst of the American tobacco farming industry, a very traditionalist, hierarchical culture.

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The Roundtable
11:35 am
Wed January 22, 2014

"A Religion Of One's Own" By Thomas Moore

Thomas Moore was a monk for twelve years, a musician, a university professor, and a psychotherapist. He writes regularly for Psychology Today, The Huffington Post, Spirituality & Health, and Resurgence Magazine. He lectures widely on holistic medicine, spirituality, psychotherapy, and the arts. Moore has been awarded numerous honors, including the Humanitarian Award from Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University and an honorary doctorate from Lesley University.

He is the author of eighteen previous books, including Care of the Soul, Soul Mates, and Dark Nights of the Soul.

At a time when so many feel disillusioned with or detached from organized religion yet long for a way to move beyond an exclusively materialistic, rational lifestyle, A Religion of One’s Own points the way to creating an amplified inner life and a world of greater purpose, meaning, and reflection.

The Roundtable
10:10 am
Mon January 13, 2014

"The Angel Effect" By John Geiger

   Do “angels” exist? If so, are they heaven-sent or products of the human brain? After the publication of the bestseller The Third Man Factor, which examined the phenomenon of explorers who found themselves at the edge of death and experienced a benevolent presence that led them out of the impossible, John Geiger was inundated with firsthand accounts from people who had the same experience—a vivid presence that aided them as they faced crises ranging from physical and sexual assaults to automobile accidents, airplane crashes, serious illness, childbirth, and depression.

His new book, The Angel Effect, examines this phenomenon, and Geiger argues that it has the potential to aid us, even to save us, and asks whether it is a trainable skill.

WAMC News
12:39 pm
Tue December 31, 2013

2013: Looking Back At The "Pope Francis Effect" And Other Religion News

Credit WAMC photo by Dave Lucas

Religious news figured prominently in the headlines during 2013.   The world was shocked in February 2013, when Benedict became the first pope to resign in almost 600 years. Fast forward nine months: Benedict's successor, the Argentine Pope Francis, was named Time Magazine's "person of the year." Not bad for a fellow who once upon at time worked as a bouncer!

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The Roundtable
10:05 am
Tue December 31, 2013

Best of 2013 - Non-Fiction - Lawrence Wright's "Going Clear"

  In Going Clear: Scientology, Hollywood, and the Prison of Belief by Lawrence Wright, we learn about Scientology’s complicated cosmology and special language. We see the ways in which the church pursues celebrities, such as Tom Cruise and John Travolta, and how such stars are used to advance the church’s goals. And we meet the young idealists who have joined the Sea Org, the church’s clergy, signing up with a billion-year contract.

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New York News
12:30 pm
Mon December 9, 2013

NY: Vatican Survey & "Francis Effect"

Pope Francis raised eyebrows when he announced the Vatican would conduct a global survey. The poll has made somewhat of a "soft landing" in North America.

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The Roundtable
11:12 am
Thu December 5, 2013

Actor Michael Zegen In "Bad Jews"

Molly Ranson, Tracee Chimo, and Michael Zegen in "Bad Jews"
Credit Joan Marcus

The Roundabout Theatre Company’s Roundabout Underground program gives productions to emerging playwrights. Last year, they had a hit with Bad Jews - a play by Joshua Harmon, directed by Daniel Aukin.

The show did so well in their 62-seat Black Box Theatre, in fact, that they brought it back to run in the Laura Pels Theatre (their bigger-small space) as part of their season this year - where it continues to earn excellent reviews and enthusiastic response from audiences.

In the play a young Jewish woman, Diana (played by Tracee Chimo, she prefers to be called by her Hebrew name, Daphna) fights with her cousin, Liam, to get a religious relic left behind by their recently deceased grandfather - who had kept it safe during his years in a concentration camp by holding it beneath his tongue. Liam’s brother (Jonah, played by Philip Ettinger) and girlfriend (Melody, played by Molly Ranson) observe and reluctantly weigh-in as Daphna and Liam argue and insult-sling as only family can.

Michael Zegen plays Liam in Bad Jews. Zegen attended Skidmore College and his other Off-Broadway credits include Liz Meriwether’s Oliver Parker! and Greg Moss’ punkplay. On television he’s been featured in recurring roles on The Walking Dead, Boardwalk Empire, How to Make It in America, Rescue Me, and he’ll appear in the upcoming season of the HBO hit, Girls. His film credits include Adventureland, Taking Woodstock, and Frances Ha.

The Roundtable
11:45 am
Tue December 3, 2013

"Living In The Shadow Of The Cross" By Paul Kivel

Over centuries, Christianity has accomplished much which is deserving of praise. Its institutions have fed the hungry, sheltered the homeless, and advocated for the poor. Christian faith has sustained people through crisis and inspired many works for social justice. Although the word "christian" implicates the epitome of goodness, the actual story is much more complex.

That story is explored in Paul Kivel’s new book Living in the Shadow of the Cross- which reveals the ongoing everyday impact of Christian power and privilege on beliefs, behaviors, and public policy.

Capital Region News
3:38 pm
Mon September 16, 2013

Meet Albany's First Female Catholic Priest

Mary Theresa Streck of Albany, the city's first female priest
Credit WAMC photo by Dave Lucas

Religious history was made over the weekend in Albany when the city's first "woman priest" was ordained.

On Sunday, Mary Theresa Streck of Albany was ordained a woman priest in the Association of Roman Catholic Women Priests. A former Sister of St. Joseph, Streck is an artist and peace activist who is cofounder and director of the Ark Community Charter School in Troy.

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