renaissance

The Roundtable
11:12 am
Wed December 10, 2014

'Saving Mona Lisa: The Battle To Protect The Louvre And Its Treasures During World War II'

    In August 1939, curators at the Louvre nestled the world's most famous painting into a special red-velvet-lined case and spirited her away to the Loire Valley. Thus began the biggest evacuation of art and antiquities in history. As the Germans neared Paris in 1940, the French raced to move the masterpieces still further south, then again and again during the war, crisscrossing the southwest of France. At times Mona Lisa slept at the bedside of curators who were painfully aware of their heavy responsibility.

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The Roundtable
10:45 am
Mon August 25, 2014

'Michelangelo: A Life In Six Masterpieces' By Miles J. Unger

    Among the immortals—Leonardo, Rembrandt, Picasso—Michelangelo stands alone as a master of painting, sculpture, and architecture.

He was not only one of the greatest artists in an age of giants, but a man who reinvented the practice of art itself. Throughout his long career he clashed with patrons by insisting that he had no master but his own demanding muse and promoting the novel idea that it was the artist, rather than the lord who paid for it, who was creative force behind the work.

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The Roundtable
11:35 am
Wed January 30, 2013

The Lost Battles: Leonardo, Michelangelo, and the Artistic Duel That Defined the Renaissance

In the early 1500s, the city of Florence, Italy, created a competition between two larger than life Renaissance figures: Leonardo da Vinci and Michelangelo. To glorify the political power of the Florentine Republic, the city commissioned these two artists to paint frescoes on opposite walls in an important public building.

In a new book, The Lost Battles: Leonardo, Michelangelo, and the Artistic Duel That Defined the Renaissance, art historian Jonathan Jones details the lives of these men, the competition between them and how their contrasting visions of mankind continue to influence art and culture today.