Gregg Levoy's book, Vital Signs is about what inspires passion and what defeats it. How we lose it and how we get it back. It’s about the endless yet endlessly fruitful tug-of-war between freedom and domestication, the wild in us and the tame, our natural selves and our conditioned selves.

 The book also affirms the importance of courageous inquiry into dispassion—where we’re numb, depressed, stuck, bored—so the reader can recognize and change these tendencies in themselves.

  Of the ten million bits of information our brains process each second, only fifty bits are devoted to conscious thought. Because our brains are wired to be inattentive, we often choose without thinking, acting against our own interests—what we truly want.

 As the former Chief Scientist of Express Scripts, a Fortune 25 healthcare company dedicated to making the use of prescription medications safer and more affordable, Bob Nease is an expert on applying behavioral sciences to health care. Now, he applies his knowledge to the wider world, providing important practical solutions marketers, human resources professionals, teachers, and even parents can use to improve the behavior of others around them, and get the positive results they want.

His new book is The Power of Fifty Bits: The New Science of Turning Good Intentions into Positive Results.

According to our guest, one reason New Year’s resolution success is so elusive is because more than 95 % of self-help books are NOT based on scientific research.

Renowned psychologist John Norcross, Ph.D., is the leading authority on behavior change. Backed by 30 years of clinical research, his new book, Changeology: 5 Steps to Realizing Your Goals and Resolutions, reveals a simple 5-step plan that can be executed in 90 days – and its methods can be applied to any behavior you might want to change.

It's that time of year again when millions of Americans vow to create good habits and break bad ones.

We welcome Jeremy Dean, the psychologist behind PsyBlog,  to explain why it is so difficult to modify our behavior -- and to stick with the change. His book is called Making Habits, Breaking Habits: Why We Do Things, Why We Don't, and How to Make Any Change Stick.