restaurant

  This Saturday, August 20th, Big Slide Brewery and Public House on Cascade Road in Lake Placid, New York will hold its grand opening party from noon to 8 p.m.

The event will include live music, locally sourced food, a mechanical bull, games and activities for kids and families, and, of course, great beer -- including a new Russian Imperial Stout, named "To Russia, with love" which has been aging in a decommissioned Atlas Missile silo for the last eight months.

The new establishment is a sister-brewery to the The Lake Placid Pub & Brewery which has been brewing excellent beer in the Adirondacks since 1996.

Our guest is Stu Ruttan, the General Manager of Big Slide Brewery and Public House.

Mimi Sheraton
Noah Fecks

  In our Ideas Matter segment we take time just about every week to check in with the state humanities councils in our 7-state region.

Today we're speaking with Mimi Sheraton about food - the ethics of food, the idea of fad diets, and how to eat responsibly.

Mimi Sheraton is a noted food and restaurant critic. She is also a board member for The New York Council for the Humanities and she served as the scholar advisor on the Council's new "Food Fight" Reading & Discussion series.

Becky Mode, Jesse Tyler Ferguson, and Jason Moore
Walter McBride / Getty Images

  Fully Committed starring Jesse Tyler Ferguson opens tonight at the Lyceum Theatre in New York City.

The play, written by Becky Mode, follows a day in the life of Sam. His job is to man the red-hot reservation line at Manhattan's number-one restaurant. Jesse Tyler Ferguson (best known for his Emmy nominated work as Mitchell on ABC’s Modern Family) plays all 40 characters, acting out the coercion, threats, bribes, and histrionics of both the would-be patrons and the staff at the very chic eatery.

Jason Moore directs this production which is scheduled for a limited run through July 24th. Moore directed the films Sisters, starring Tina Fey and Amy Poehler, and Pitch Perfect. For Broadway he's directed Shrek The Musical and the Tony Award winning production of Avenue Q.

    Hudson Valley Restaurant Week, presented by The Valley Table magazine, celebrates the region’s cuisine and diverse dining scene, which continues to have a strong focus on sourcing local, sustainable, seasonal products during Hudson Valley’s fall harvest season.

HVRW returns for its 11th bi-annual event from November 3 (that’s today!) to the 16 with two-hundred restaurants from the region’s seven counties expected to participate in the two-week dining experience.

Dutchess County Regional Chamber of Commerce

Each week for Food Friday, we go to a different part of the WAMC listening area to find the best spots to grab a bite. 

In New York's Dutchess County
From the Dutchess County Regional Chamber of Commerce

    Hudson Valley Restaurant Week began in 2006 with a distinguished board of advisors, including chefs, restaurateurs and tourism leaders. The two-week culinary event premiered with 70 restaurants.

Today, with more than 180 participating restaurants spanning 7 counties it is among the largest Restaurant Week events in the country. Participating counties include Dutchess, Westchester, Columbia, Orange, Putnam, Rockland and Ulster. It has become a successful collaborative effort involving farmers, growers, wine makers and chefs.

Here now to tell us more (and to feed us) are Agnes Devereux from The Village TeaRoom in New Paltz and Josh Kroner from Terrapin Restaurant in Rhinebeck. Via phone we are joined - eventually - by Janet Crenshaw, founder of Hudson Valley Restaurant Week.

Just over a year after emerging from bankruptcy, the Friendly’s restaurant chain on Monday introduced redesigned stores and updated menus.

Friendly’s , which lost business over the last decade to casual dining competitors, is hoping  to get people back into its booths in renovated restaurants that have a retro-look. A new menu includes classic best sellers and new items.  CEO John Maguire says there is an emphasis on better food quality and faster service. 

For Julia Pandl, the rite of passage into young-adulthood included mandatory service at her family’s restaurant, where she watched as her father—who was also the chef—ruled with the strictness of a drill sergeant.

At age twelve, Julie was initiated into the rite of the Sunday brunch, a weekly madhouse at her father’s Milwaukee-based restaurant, where she and her eight older siblings before her did service in a situation of controlled chaos, learning the ropes of the family business and, more important, learning life lessons that would shape them for all the years to come.