retirement

It is a sad week in Radioland this week as one of our brightest lights retires from his post. 

Robert Siegel joined NPR in 1976 and he’s been there ever since. He’ll leave the network at the end of next week. Siegel became host of All Things Considered in 1987. But before that he played an important role in the network’s growth. He opened NPR’s first overseas bureau, in London, in 1979 and stayed there for four years.

Robert Siegel’s final day as host of All Things Considered will be January 5th and it is a great pleasure to welcome his to the RT this morning.

From the beet fields of North Dakota to the National Forest campgrounds of California to Amazon’s CamperForce program in Texas, employers have discovered a new, low-cost labor pool, made up largely of transient older Americans. Finding that social security comes up short, often underwater on mortgages, these invisible casualties of the Great Recession have taken to the road by the tens of thousands in late-model RVs, travel trailers, and vans, forming a growing community of nomads: migrant laborers who call themselves “workampers.”

On frequently traveled routes between seasonal jobs, Jessica Bruder meets people from all walks of life: a former professor, a McDonald’s vice president, a minister, a college administrator, and a motorcycle cop, among many others―including her irrepressible protagonist, a onetime cocktail waitress, Home Depot clerk, and general contractor named Linda May.

Jessica Bruder is a journalist who reports on subcultures and economic justice. Her newest book is Nomadland: Surviving America in the Twenty-First Century

Beth Finkel, AARP New York State Director , stands with 10,000 postcards the group delivered to lawmakers , urging support for a new retirement plan option for those without pensions or 401k's
Karen DeWitt

Members of a leading senior citizens lobby group are advocating for a retirement plan in New York that could benefit their children and grandchildren.

New York’s middle class is struggling to afford basic necessities as retirement is becoming an illusion for them. That's the finding of an AARP-commissioned Siena College poll.

Matthew Trump

Connecticut lawmakers worked into the weekend to pass several pieces of legislation before the end of the formal session. 

On October 15th NPR's Morning Edition Host David Greene and NPR reporter Yuki Noguchi will be in Albany with Michelle Singletary, a nationally syndicated personal finance columnist for the Washington Post, and financial planner Louis Barajas for a conversation about personal finance. It is part of NPR's Family Matters Series.

They will tackle a number of topics like paying for college, buying a house, and paying for retirement. All of this happens October 15th at the University at Albany Recital Hall.

  A growing chorus of prominent voices in Congress and elsewhere are calling for the expansion of our Social Security system—people who know that Social Security will not “go broke” and does not add a penny to the national debt.

Eric Kingson is the co-author of the new book, Social Security Works!: Why Social Security Isn’t Going Broke and How Expanding It Will Help Us All.

photo provided

    What happens to a Congressperson’s perspective once reelection is off the table?

In today’s Congressional Corner, New York Congressman Bill Owens tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock the answer to that question.

photo provided

    Congressman Bill Owens of New York will leave the House at the end of the year. In today’s Congressional Corner, Owens tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock that he does not regret his decision to retire.

WCC President Announces Retirement

Nov 8, 2013
Courtesy of Westchester Community College

The nation’s longest-serving community college president is retiring.

Westchester Community College President Dr. Joseph Hankin announced his retirement after serving as the college’s president for 42 years. Patrick Hennessey is the college’s spokesman.

Encore Career Handbook

Jan 15, 2013

Until fairly recently, most Americans equated the end of a successful career with the beginning of retirement. No more. Now they want to stay in the game (or better, change the game). They want to leave a mark. Make a difference—and continue to make a living.

Retirement on the Line

Apr 24, 2012

We welcome Caitrin Lynch and speak with her about her book, Retirement on the Line: Age, Work, and Value in an American Factory .