Two environmental groups will be in Rockland County Monday evening to talk about risks from crude oil transport through the Hudson Valley.

Riverkeeper Holds Beer-Naming Contest

Aug 30, 2014

The public has a chance to a name a new beer in the Hudson Valley.

WAMC, Allison Dunne

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo's plan to use clean water funds to help pay for the new Tappan Zee Bridge has been approved by a key state board. However, a federal agency is reviewing the plan, and environmental groups are among those in opposition.


There have been several developments this week impacting oil trains, the subject of national and local debate.

The U.S. Department of Transportation on Wednesday issued new proposed rules on tankers transporting oil including quickly phasing out the use of old DOT-111 rail cars for moving crude oil and other hazardous liquids. The rules would include new operational requirements to lower operating speeds and enhance braking capabilities for high-hazard flammable trains. 

Tony Fischer, flickr

A proposal from the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation to force the closure of Indian Point during periods of the summer season to cut down on fish kills is the subject of public hearings Tuesday in Westchester County. Both sides say they want to protect the Hudson River, but the methods differ.

Tony Fischer, flickr

There is a public meeting Wednesday evening in Westchester County on the Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s annual safety review of Indian Point.

Enviro Groups To Hold Crude Oil Forum In Newburgh

May 5, 2014
Roy Luck, flickr

NEWBURGH, N.Y. (AP) and (WAMC) — Environmental groups concerned about expanded crude oil transportation along the Hudson River are holding a forum Monday evening for local residents.

WAMC Photo by Dave Lucas

Sewage pollution in the Hudson River at Albany will be reduced under a $136 million plan announced Thursday by New York State environmental regulators, the city of Albany and five other surrounding communities. 

A cleaner future for the Hudson River in 15 years? Officials say it's do-able. Under an agreement with the Department of Environmental Conservation, a coalition of six communities will upgrade sewer systems to reduce discharges of storm water-diluted sewage after heavy rain.

Courtesy of Riverkeeper

Atlantic Richfield Co. has agreed to clean up PCB-contaminated soils and Hudson River sediment in Westchester County in a project New York conservation officials estimate will cost more than $250 million.

The Department of Environmental Conservation says the consent order with ARCO is for the Harbor at Hastings site where its predecessor company, Anaconda Wire & Cable Co., released polychlorinated biphenyls and metals into the soil, groundwater and river sediment from manufacturing operations.

WAMC Photo by Dave Lucas

Results of a study requested by New York state comptroller Thomas DiNapoli and released late Friday show no need for General Electric to voluntarily expand dredging that's already under way in a portion of the upper Hudson River contaminated with PCBs.