rock music

Sarah McGowan
Sarah McGowan

We’re going to introduce you to someone new: musician Sarah McGowan, whose debut album For Whom They Sing is out now. The 10 songs on this album span earnest folk, cheeky anthems and indie pop, to name a few. McGowan will perform at Parish Public House in Albany on April 16.

The rock band Kansas is performing at Pittsfield's Colonial Theatre Saturday. From left to right is Richard Williams, Billy Greer, David Ragsdale, Ronnie Platt, Phil Ehart, and David Manion
Courtesy Photo/ Marti Griffin

With hits like “Carry On My Wayward Son” and “Dust in the Wind,” the band Kansas has spent more than four decades as a pillar of rock music. On the verge of releasing its first studio album since 2000, the band will perform at Pittsfield’s Colonial Theatre Saturday night.

Paul Kantner
Craig O'Neal, Wikicommons

We're only a month in and already 2016 has been a terrible year when it comes to the titans of rock. We've lost David Bowie, Glenn Frey, and now Paul Kantner, a founding a member of the San Francisco psychedelic band Jefferson Airplane, who died this week at age 74.

Remembering Glenn Frey

Jan 19, 2016
Glenn Frey
Glenn Frey

Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Glenn Frey died Monday at the age of 67, leaving behind a renowned musical legacy in multiple genres. A co-founder of the Eagles, who sold millions of records behind hits like “Take It Easy” and “Hotel California” just to name a few, Frey began the group in L.A. in the early 70s after touring with Linda Ronstadt.

Chris Cornell

One of rock’s greatest singers, Chris Cornell scaled the music world decades ago with Soundgarden, selling millions of records, packing arenas and helping to define the sound of a generation.

Considered one of the greatest harmony singers in rock history, David Crosby is back in the limelight as a solo artist this winter with the release of his first studio album in two decades, Croz, out now from Blue Castle Records, the label he founded with longtime collaborator Graham Nash.

Tony Fletcher
Tony Fletcher

Something in my email caught my eye a couple months ago. Rock writer Tony Fletcher, who lives in the Hudson Valley and has been an occasional guest on this show, was selling off huge chunks of his music collection. Why was the leading authority on Keith Moon and a bunch of other bands hocking a life’s collection of CDs, records, and DVDs?

Of all the grunge bands to emerge from the fertile Seattle scene about 25 years ago, Alice in Chains stood out for its mix of hard-driving rock and affecting harmonies. Despite Nirvana’s reputation as a groundbreaker, it was Alice in Chains that was the first to go national.

As it often does in music, however, success brought problems: drugs, canceled tours, and tragic deaths. All of this makes for compelling reading in the first proper biography of the band, Alice in Chains: The Untold Story, by David de Sola, who also charts the group’s unexpected resurgence over the past decade.

Richard Goldstein didn’t set out to be a literary pioneer — as a young man, he simply found himself drawn to Greenwich Village from his Bronx project where a new generation of young people was changing popular culture.

Lukas Nelson Brings Promise Of The Real To Region

Nov 12, 2015
Lukas Nelson

Musician Lukas Nelson, who has spent much of the past year performing and recording with Neil Young, is coming through the WAMC listening area this weekend with the band Promise of the Real. The group's new record Something Real comes out in February, and as Lukas Nelson (who is the son of Willie Nelson) tells Brian Shields, the band will be playing new music tonight at The Capitol in Port Chester and Saturday at the Putnam Den in Saratoga Springs.

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