rock music

Scott Sharrard
Scott Sharrard

The guitar virtuoso Scott Sharrard is spending a good bit of time in our region over the next few weeks, and it’s a chance to hear one of the best working axmen on the road today. The music director for the Gregg Allman band, which he joined in 2008, Sharrard has also toured and recorded with The Chesterfields and as a solo artist. Right now, he’s touring with the Brickyard Band. Sharrard will play the Athens Summer Concert series in Greene County on Friday; the Madison Theater in Albany on Saturday, and the Falcon in Marlboro, NY October 14th. With Gregg Allman, Sharrard is back in Albany August 24 at the Times Union Center and in Hartford a week later.

Susan Tedeschi and Derek Trucks.
Tedeschi Trucks Band

It’s hard to believe that Tedeschi Trucks Band has only been around for six years, because they’re the kind of group that sounds permanent. The blues and rock juggernaut released its third album Let Me Get By in January, and it quickly earned popular and critical praise. And if it’s summer, it means Derek Trucks, widely considered one of the greatest guitarists in the world, is on the road. Trucks joined the Allman Brothers Band as a teen and has toured and collaborated with a who’s who of the music industry in the years since.

Warren Haynes
Warren Haynes

A gifted, versatile and always busy guitar master is coming back to our region on Friday. Warren Haynes, known for his work with The Allman Brothers Band, Gov’t Mule, and The Dead, will be at Tanglewood for the latest stop on his Jerry Garcia Symphonic Celebration. Joining the Boston Pops Esplanade Orchestra, Haynes will be performing the music of Jerry Garcia starting at 8 p.m. Haynes will continue the tour at Bethel Woods in Sullivan County August 6 and returns with Gov’t Mule to Utica August 16.

John Popper and Blues Traveler
Blues Traveler

From the suburbs of New Jersey to the clubs of New York to the top of the charts, musician John Popper has been pushing the boundaries of what’s possible on his instrument for decades. Best known as the frontman for Blues Traveler, Popper has collaborated with just about everyone in the music world by now. But as he writes in his new memoir, Popper wasn’t always a rock star — he started out as a socially awkward child who never did his homework. And in some ways, his struggles continued into adulthood.

Wavy Gravy Turning 80

May 13, 2016
Wavy Gravy is turning 80. He grew up in the Capital Region.
Wavy Gravy

This Sunday is a landmark birthday for Hugh Romney. Who? You might know him better as Wavy Gravy, the hippie era MC who founded the Hog Farm, Camp Winnirainbow and has been a constant on the jam scene since its earliest days. Now, Wavy Gravy is turning 80. As we discovered in a 2011 Roundtable interview, Wavy Gravy has warm memories of his childhood in East Greenbush.

Sarah McGowan
Sarah McGowan

We’re going to introduce you to someone new: musician Sarah McGowan, whose debut album For Whom They Sing is out now. The 10 songs on this album span earnest folk, cheeky anthems and indie pop, to name a few. McGowan will perform at Parish Public House in Albany on April 16.

The rock band Kansas is performing at Pittsfield's Colonial Theatre Saturday. From left to right is Richard Williams, Billy Greer, David Ragsdale, Ronnie Platt, Phil Ehart, and David Manion
Courtesy Photo/ Marti Griffin

With hits like “Carry On My Wayward Son” and “Dust in the Wind,” the band Kansas has spent more than four decades as a pillar of rock music. On the verge of releasing its first studio album since 2000, the band will perform at Pittsfield’s Colonial Theatre Saturday night.

Paul Kantner
Craig O'Neal, Wikicommons

We're only a month in and already 2016 has been a terrible year when it comes to the titans of rock. We've lost David Bowie, Glenn Frey, and now Paul Kantner, a founding a member of the San Francisco psychedelic band Jefferson Airplane, who died this week at age 74.

Remembering Glenn Frey

Jan 19, 2016
Glenn Frey
Glenn Frey

Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Glenn Frey died Monday at the age of 67, leaving behind a renowned musical legacy in multiple genres. A co-founder of the Eagles, who sold millions of records behind hits like “Take It Easy” and “Hotel California” just to name a few, Frey began the group in L.A. in the early 70s after touring with Linda Ronstadt.

Chris Cornell

One of rock’s greatest singers, Chris Cornell scaled the music world decades ago with Soundgarden, selling millions of records, packing arenas and helping to define the sound of a generation.

Considered one of the greatest harmony singers in rock history, David Crosby is back in the limelight as a solo artist this winter with the release of his first studio album in two decades, Croz, out now from Blue Castle Records, the label he founded with longtime collaborator Graham Nash.

Tony Fletcher
Tony Fletcher

Something in my email caught my eye a couple months ago. Rock writer Tony Fletcher, who lives in the Hudson Valley and has been an occasional guest on this show, was selling off huge chunks of his music collection. Why was the leading authority on Keith Moon and a bunch of other bands hocking a life’s collection of CDs, records, and DVDs?

Of all the grunge bands to emerge from the fertile Seattle scene about 25 years ago, Alice in Chains stood out for its mix of hard-driving rock and affecting harmonies. Despite Nirvana’s reputation as a groundbreaker, it was Alice in Chains that was the first to go national.

As it often does in music, however, success brought problems: drugs, canceled tours, and tragic deaths. All of this makes for compelling reading in the first proper biography of the band, Alice in Chains: The Untold Story, by David de Sola, who also charts the group’s unexpected resurgence over the past decade.

Richard Goldstein didn’t set out to be a literary pioneer — as a young man, he simply found himself drawn to Greenwich Village from his Bronx project where a new generation of young people was changing popular culture.

Lukas Nelson Brings Promise Of The Real To Region

Nov 12, 2015
Lukas Nelson

Musician Lukas Nelson, who has spent much of the past year performing and recording with Neil Young, is coming through the WAMC listening area this weekend with the band Promise of the Real. The group's new record Something Real comes out in February, and as Lukas Nelson (who is the son of Willie Nelson) tells Brian Shields, the band will be playing new music tonight at The Capitol in Port Chester and Saturday at the Putnam Den in Saratoga Springs.

Alan Barnes

Simon Townshend is highly regarded for his raw and honest songwriting, meticulous playing and distinctive vocals — apparent on his latest album, Denial, released last year. Over the past three-plus decades, Townshend has released seven studio albums, two live albums, and two EPs.

As The Who gears up for the last leg of what the band swears will be its last tour — a claim first made in the 1980s — they’ve been opening shows with their first proper single, “I Can’t Explain,” written more than five decades ago when rock was still seen as a passing fad.

  Fresh off celebrating their 30th anniversary as one of the most beloved bands in alt-rock history, Yo La Tengo is releasing Stuff Like That There on Matador Records. The album comes out this week and the band will go on tour next month, starting September 23rd at Troy Savings Bank Music Hall.

Stuff Like That There is a conceptual sequel to YLT’s 1990 album, Fakebook. The fourteen song record features two new tunes, three re-arranged and recorded Yo La Tengo songs, and nine covers.

The trio of Ira Kaplan, Georgia Hubley and James McNew reunite with former member Dave Schramm on electric guitar and the album is produced by Fakebook’s producer, Gene Holder.

Ira Kaplan and James McNew join us.

  Will Hermes is a music critic for NPR’s All Things Considered, a Contributing Editor for Rolling Stone, and author of Love Goes to Buildings on Fire: Five Years in New York That Changed Music Forever.

We’re lucky to have Will - a Hudson Valley resident - to share his music expertise with us at year’s end.

British musician Joe Cocker has died at 70, according to multiple reports. The singer best known for his cover of The Beatles' "With A Little Help From My Friends" performed for more than four decades, including an iconic set at Woodstock.

One the founders of the genre now known as thrash metal, Scott Ian was a typical Jewish kid in 1960s Queens, into comics and movies. His life changed forever when he saw bands like KISS and the Ramones, and before long, he was on the road himself, the heartbeat of the band Anthrax, contemporaries with bands like Metallica and Slayer.  

The Rolling Stones recently marked their 50th anniversary with a new round of interviews and concerts, but largely left out of the celebration was the band’s founder.

The word intimate is overused when describing music, especially in the singer-songwriter genre, but our guest Matthew Fowler takes you into his home on his debut album Beginning — literally.

Sarah LaDuke

Twelve years is an eternity in music — and once-inseparable band members often go their separate ways, start families, and find that day jobs have become job-jobs.

Facebook: Legends of the Lighthouse

A concert this weekend will feature a line of local and nationally-known musicians who have performed in Pittsfield, Massachusetts, while also benefiting a long-standing youth organization in the city.

Leonard Cohen turns 80 on September 21, two days before his 13 studio album comes out, and he has never been more popular. Cohen has long fascinated his chroniclers; hinting at a performative aspect of his public persona, disappearing for long stretches, and candidly discussing his battles with depression and lost love.

The band Little Feat might be little remembered among casual music fans, but like many of its 60s and 70s brethren, the band has soldiered on through brief pop stardom, band deaths and the disagreements that often derail rock groups forever.

Miguel Pola Photographers

Summer might not be endless here in the Northeast, but our region is gearing up for some more “Fun Fun Fun” before fall when The Beach Boys stop at Tanglewood in Lenox, Massachusetts this Monday night, featuring original members Bruce Johnston and Mike Love.

Bob Dylan turned 73 this year, and his music has spawned more than a half-century of enjoyment, argument, scholarship, social change and bewilderment. Often, fan interest has crossed the line over to obsession unique to Dylan fans, many of whom think the meaning of life might be buried somewhere on Self Portrait.

  Sarah Lee Guthrie and Johnny Irion have been busy and away from home for most of the last year, touring in support of their album, Wassaic Way - which was produced by Wilco’s Jeff Tweedy and Patrick Sansone. Nearly a decade after the folk-rock duo put out their first album together, the husband-and-wife pair feel like they’ve finally hit their stride.

Sarah Lee and Johnny will play at The Guthrie Center in Great Barrington, MA this Friday night at 8 o’clock.