rock music

Ed Kowalczyk

During his long career with the rock group Live, frontman Ed Kowalczyk was the one you watched — a unique vocalist and songwriter who led the York, Pennsylvania-group to the top of the charts and worldwide fame.

A tale of youth disaffection amid domestic challenges and international strife in the Bush years, Green Day’s American Idiot transformed from one of the biggest rock albums of the mid-aughts to a Broadway behemoth directed by Tony-winner Michael Mayer.

Considered one of the greatest harmony singers in rock history, David Crosby is back in the limelight as a solo artist this winter with the release of his first studio album in two decades, Croz, out now from Blue Castle Records, the label he founded with longtime collaborator Graham Nash.

A former heavy metal rock music producer based in Los Angeles is now enjoying success as an innkeeper in the Berkshires.

The sounds Tom Werman used to hear came from a smoke-filled windowless music studio when he was producing records for rock groups like Cheap Trick, Motley Crue, Twisted Sister, Poison and Ted Nugent. Now, his ears ring with the sounds from a smoke-filled kitchen – but don’t worry, it has windows.

When Nirvana frontman Kurt Cobain shot himself with a shotgun in 1994, his mother told a reporter, “Now he’s gone and joined that stupid club,” referring not just to the long list of rock stars who also succumbed to drugs, drink and fame, but also to the roster of legends who left the stage forever at the age of 27.

Stoked by a rabid tabloid press and international interest the likes of which hasn’t been seen in pop music since, the Beatles-Rolling Stones rivalry was considered overblown even by members of each band. But below the surface, there was plenty of tension and competition, often good-natured but sometimes nasty, especially as the 60s came to a close.

Tony Fletcher, a writer now living in the Hudson Valley, shares an origin story with many of the British rockers he has spent a lifetime chronicling: modest beginnings on sometimes rough London streets, a single-parent home, an early obsession with records, band trivia, and ear-thumping shows.

  From London’s West End, the worldwide smash hit musical by Queen and Ben Elton, We Will Rock You, is coming to Proctors in Schenectady, NY this weekend - running on the mainstage November 29th through December 1.

The show is a bona-fide hit and has been running for 11 years in London. This is the first North American Tour of the sci-fi musical-theater extravaganza which by all accounts honors the iconic music that frames it - the music of Queen.

Ryan Knowles plays Buddy (as in “Buddy you're a boy make a big noise playin' in the street gonna be a big man some day”). Ryan’s other credits include off-broadway productions of NEWSical: The Musical, the Radio City Christmas Spectacular, Caligula Maximus, Fools in Love, and National Tours of How the Grinch Stole Christmas! and OZ: The Musical.

Guitarist Steven Van Zandt of the E Street Band knows plenty about good band chemistry, and for 40 years, his favorite group and one of the 60’s most influential bands, The Rascals, lay dormant in what he called “a crime against nature.”

Rock legend Ray Davies was already facing transitions in his personal and professional life in 2004, when, one week after being named a Commander of the Order of the British Empire by Queen Elizabeth, he was shot in the leg during a mugging in New Orleans. Davies had come to New Orleans in a search for musical authenticity and a compass for his personal life. Instead, he found himself a violent crime victim and anchored to a bed for weeks.