romance

Mark Lukach is a teacher and freelance writer. His work has been published in the New York Times, The Atlantic, Pacific Standard, Wired, and other publications. He is currently the ninth grade dean at The Athenian School, where he also teaches history.

Mark and Giulia’s life together began as a storybook romance. They fell in love at eighteen, married at twenty-four, and were living their dream life in San Francisco. When Giulia was twenty-seven, she suffered a terrifying and unexpected psychotic break that landed her in the psych ward for nearly a month. One day she was vibrant and well-adjusted; the next she was delusional and suicidal, convinced that her loved ones were not safe.

Mark recounts their experience in My Lovely Wife in the Psych Ward: A Memoir.

In Josh Barkan’s Mexico: Stories  the characters - chef, architect, nurse, high school teacher, painter, beauty queen, classical bass player, plastic surgeon, businessman, mime - are simply trying to lead their lives and steer clear of violence. Yet, inevitably, crime has a way of intruding on their lives all the same.

A surgeon finds himself forced into performing a risky procedure on a narco killer. A teacher struggles to protect lovestruck students whose forbidden romance has put them in mortal peril. A painter’s freewheeling ways land him in the back of a kidnapper’s car. Again and again, the walls between “ordinary life” and cartel violence are shown to be paper thin, and when they collapse the consequences are life-changing.

In What Love Is, philosopher Carrie Jenkins offers a bold new theory on the nature of romantic love that reconciles its humanistic and scientific components. Love can be a social construct (the idea of a perfect fairy tale romance) and a physical manifestation (those anxiety- inducing heart palpitations); we must recognize its complexities and decide for ourselves how to love.

Motivated by her own polyamorous relationships, she examines the ways in which our parameters of love have recently changed-to be more accepting of homosexual, interracial, and non-monogamous relationships-and how they will continue to evolve in the future. 

  In our Ideas Matter segment we take time just about every week to check in with the state humanities councils in our 7-state region.

This week, we are talking with filmmaker Laurie Kahn about her new documentary, Love Between the Covers, a film about popular romance novels and the author-reader community that sustains the billion dollar popular romance fiction industry.

The film has garnered rave reviews at the Library of Congress as well as at film festivals around the country, most recently in Woods Hole, Massachusetts. It was funded both by Mass Humanities and the National Endowment for the Humanities.

  

  We are very happy to continue our regular feature – Ideas Matter: Checking in with the Public Humanities.

Today we are talking with Pleun Bouricius, Director of Programs for Mass Humanities, about Laurie Kahn's forthcoming documentary, Love Between the Covers, a film about popular romance novels and the author-reader community that sustains the billion dollar popular romance fiction industry.

The film was funded both by Mass Humanities and the National Endowment for the Humanities. With them, we will explore what motivated them to fund and explore this topic, which which has raised some hackles in conservative circles, but also garnered rave reviews at its sneak preview at the Library of Congress.

  The summer Lisa A. Phillips turned thirty, she fell in love with someone who didn’t return her feelings. She soon became obsessed. She followed him around, called him compulsively, and talked about him endlessly. One desperate morning, after she snuck into his apartment building, he picked up a baseball bat to protect himself and began to dial 911. Her unrequited love had changed her from a sane, conscientious college teacher and radio reporter into someone she barely recognized—someone who was taking her yearning much too far.

Blending memoir, literary exposition, and revealing case studies, Lisa A. Phillips book, Unrequited, is an exploration of one-sided romantic obsession.

    In Innocence, Dean Koontz blends mystery, suspense, and acute insight into the human soul in a masterfully told tale that will resonate with readers forever.

He lives in solitude beneath the city, an exile from society, which will destroy him if he is ever seen.She dwells in seclusion, a fugitive from enemies who will do her harm if she is ever found. But the bond between them runs deeper than the tragedies that have scarred their lives. Something more than chance—and nothing less than destiny—has brought them together in a world whose hour of reckoning is fast approaching.

Today is Valentine’s Day, a day of chocolate, flowers, and love… or is it?

Today we want your take on this holiday. Is it a fun way to spend some time with your sweetheart, or a day manufactured by card and candy companies to boost first quarter earnings? WAMC's 'resident softie' Alan Chartock joins host Ray Graf.

  Elise Linscott is a senior at Western New England University in Springfield, Massachusetts.

Morgan Rhodes - Falling Kingdoms

Jan 18, 2013

Most people know Morgan Rhodes as paranormal romance novelist Michelle Rowen.  But under this pen name Rhodes has launched another successful series with her novel Falling Kingdoms. In this Game of Thrones-esque  high fantasy, Rhodes has created a world that’s raging with war, deceit, spoiled royals, and a populous needing little to spark a revolution.