rome

Richard M. Cohen is the author of two New York Times bestsellers: a memoir, "Blindsided," detailing his struggles with MS and cancer and his controversial career in the news business; and "Strong at the Broken Places," following the lives of five individuals living with serious chronic illnesses. His distinguished career in network news earned him numerous awards, including three Emmys and a Peabody.

After more than four decades living with multiple sclerosis, New York Times bestselling author Richard M. Cohen finds a flicker of hope in a groundbreaking medical procedure. His new book is "Chasing Hope."

David I. Kertzer is the Paul Dupee, Jr. University Professor of Social Science and professor of anthropology and Italian studies at Brown University, where he served as provost from 2006 to 2011.

He is the author of twelve books, including "The Pope and Mussolini," winner of the 2015 Pulitzer Prize for biography and the American Historical Association Prize for best book on Italian history.

Kertzer is one of the world’s foremost experts on the history of Italy and the Vatican and has a rare ability to bring that history vividly to life. His new book, "The Pope Who Would Be King," sheds fascinating new light on the end of rule by divine right in the West and the emergence of modern Europe.

ICE logo
WikiMedia Commons

A central New York dairy farmer says seven federal immigration officers came onto his property without permission, arrested a Guatemalan worker without producing a warrant and handcuffed the farmer when he video-recorded their actions.

Scott Davidson/Flickr

A Central New York police officer who left his baby son inside a hot vehicle for hours won't face charges in the boy's death.

Police say a 7-month-old infant found dead at a central New York home died of a gunshot wound.

    James Romm, the James Ottaway Jr. Professor of Classics at Bard College is the author of several books on ancient Greek and Macedonian history and on imperial Rome. His latest book is: Dying Every Day: Seneca at the Court of Nero.

At the center, the tumultuous life of Seneca, ancient Rome’s preeminent writer and philosopher, beginning with banishment in his fifties and subsequent appointment as tutor to twelve-year-old Nero, future emperor of Rome. Controlling them both, Nero’s mother, Julia Agrippina the Younger, Roman empress, great-granddaughter of the Emperor Augustus, sister of the Emperor Caligula, niece and fourth wife of Emperor Claudius.

James Romm will be part of this weekend’s Read Local Red Hook Literary Festival.