The Roundtable

Elizabeth Lesser, cofounder of Omega Institute and the Omega Women's Leadership Center, is author of The Seeker's Guide and Broken Open.

Her new memoir is Marrow, a visceral and profound memoir of two sisters who, in the face of a bone marrow transplant—one the donor and one the recipient—begin a quest for acceptance, authenticity, and most of all, love.

A former child actor best known for her starring roles in Matilda and Mrs. Doubtfire, Mara Wilson has always felt a little young and out of place: as the only kid on a film set full of adults, the first daughter in a house full of boys, a Valley girl in New York and a neurotic in California, and a grown-up the world still remembers as a little girl.

Tackling everything from what she learned about sex on the set of Melrose Place, to discovering in adolescence that she was no longer “cute” enough for Hollywood, her book, Where Am I Now?: True Stories of Girlhood and Accidental Fame, charts her journey from accidental fame to relative (but happy) obscurity.

In her new book: Modified: GMOs and the Threat to Our Food, Our Land, Our Future, journalist Caitlin Shetterly has turned her own personal journey into an exploration of how GMOs may be affecting not only our health but our agricultural future as well.

Shetterly begins with her own family ordeal: her one-year old son would have bedtime episode where he would cry incessantly, stop breathing, and turn blue, and his body was covered with eczema. A forward-thinking pediatrician added corn to the list of foods to cut out of the baby’s diet to check for allergens, and his health problems all but disappeared. Then Shetterly herself began to suffer.

Shetterly decided to research all this which took her on a road trip through Nebraska and into Iowa, where she witnessed firsthand the changing face of agricultural America. 

9/22/16 Panel

22 hours ago

 The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, Director of the Journalism Program at the University at Albany Rosemary Armao and corporate attorney, Rich Honen.

9/21/16 Panel

Sep 21, 2016

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, Director of the Journalism Program at the University at Albany Rosemary Armao, and political consultant and lobbyist, Libby Post.

  You can take care of your sweet tooth this Saturday for For Goodness Bake, a bake sale to raise funds and awareness for the Beacon Community Kitchen. The event will be held from 10:00 - 4:00 PM at Catalyst Gallery on Main Street.

The Beacon Community Kitchen, formerly the Beacon Soup Kitchen, is a volunteer run organization led by InCareOf, which strives to serve over 50 Beacon residents daily. After the sudden closing of the Salvation Army soup kitchen in November 2015, community members and local organizations quickly banded together to find a new home for the kitchen in an effort to maintain operations seamlessly. Within two weeks, the kitchen was fully operational and serving meals from its new home at Tabernacle of Christ Church in Beacon.

All proceeds from For Goodness Bake will be used to purchase new kitchen equipment and basic food supplies, as well as expand the Kitchen’s outreach within our community and to local housing developments. We are joined by Kristen Pratt and Tara Tornello - For Goodness Bake co-founders; and Catherine Stankowski, Beacon Community Kitchen volunteer.

    This week's Book Picks  come from Phil Lewis of The Bennington Bookshop.

List:
Shirley Jackson: A Rather Haunted Life by Ruth Franklin
Presumption of Guilt by Archer Mayor
The Sympathizer by Viet Thanh Nguyen
The House at Riverton by Kate Morton
The Last Days of Night by Graham Moore
Seven Brief Lessons on Physics by Carlo Rovelli
I Let You Go by Clare Mackintosh
Blue Monday by Nicci French
Leave Me by Gayle Forman
Love Warrior by Glennon Doyle Melton
Circling the Sun by Paula McLain

9/20/16 Panel

Sep 20, 2016

    The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, Associate Editor of the Times Union Mike Spain, and Director of the Journalism Program at the University at Albany Rosemary Armao.

  Claude Monet is perhaps the world's most beloved artist, and among all his creations, the paintings of the water lilies in his garden at Giverny are most famous. Seeing them in museums around the world, viewers are transported by the power of Monet's brush into a peaceful world of harmonious nature. Monet himself intended them to provide “an asylum of peaceful meditation.”

Yet, as Ross King reveals in Mad Enchantment: Claude Monet and the Painting of the Water Lilies his chronicle of both artist and masterpiece, these beautiful canvases belie the intense frustration Monet experienced at the difficulties of capturing the fugitive effects of light, water, and color. They also reflect the terrible personal torments Monet suffered in the last dozen years of his life.

  Charles Wheelan is the author of the best-selling Naked Statistics and Naked Economics and is a former correspondent for The Economist. He teaches public policy and economics at Dartmouth College.

Consider the $20 bill.

It has no more value, as a simple slip of paper, than Monopoly money. Yet even children recognize that tearing one into small pieces is an act of inconceivable stupidity. What makes a $20 bill actually worth twenty dollars? In Naked Money, Charles Wheelan uses this seemingly simple question to open the door to the surprisingly colorful world of money and banking.

  Our Falling into Place series spotlights the important work of -and fosters collaboration between- not-for-profit organizations in our communities; allowing us all to fall into place.

Falling Into Place is supported by The Seymour Fox Memorial Foundation: Providing a helping hand to turn inspiration into accomplishment. See more possibilities … see more promise… see more progress.

This week we are joined by Carol Horn and Kathy Sacks from Homeward Bound Dog Rescue.

9/19/16 Panel

Sep 19, 2016

   The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, Director of the Journalism Program at the University at Albany Rosemary Armao, and political consultant and lobbyist, Libby Post.

  Young black men are 21 times more likely to be killed by police than their white counterparts. The unemployment rate for African Americans has been double that of whites for more than half a century. And yet Americans cling desperately to the myth that we are living in a post-racial society, that the election of the first black president spelled doom for racist policies and racist beliefs. In fact, racist thought is alive and well in America; it has simply become more sophisticated and more insidious.

Award-winning historian Ibram X. Kendi argues in Stamped from the Beginning, if we have any hope of grappling with this stark reality, we must first understand how racist ideas were developed, disseminated, and enshrined in American society.

9/16/16 Panel

Sep 16, 2016

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, Director of the Journalism Program at the University at Albany Rosemary Armao, and author and activist Barbara Smith. 

Eric Rickstad

Sep 15, 2016

  Eric Rickstad is the New York Times Bestselling author of the mystery novel The Silent Girls, heralded as intelligent and profound, dark, disturbing, and heartbreaking.

His first novel Reap was a New York Times Noteworthy Novel. His newest novel is Lie In Wait is a thriller - taking place in Vermont’s Northeast Kingdom, featuring Detective Sonja Test.

   David Simon is best known as creator of HBO's The Wire which chronicled the story of Baltimore's police department and its gangs. A former reporter for The Baltimore Sun, Simon is also known for his NBC police procedural Homicide: Life on the Streets. The show was based on his book, Homicide: A Year on the Killing Streets.

This week he spoke at Williams College, presenting a lecture entitled "The Audacity of Despair."

9/15/16 Panel

Sep 15, 2016

   The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, Director of the Journalism Program at the University at Albany Rosemary Armao, and WAMC's Ray Graf.

  Ariel Leve is an award-winning journalist who has written for the Guardian, Financial Times Magazine, the Telegraph, the Observer, and the London Sunday Times Magazine, where she was a senior writer and a columnist.

Ariel Leve grew up in Manhattan with an eccentric mother she describes as “a poet, an artist, a self-appointed troublemaker and attention seeker.” Leve learned to become her own parent, taking care of herself and her mother’s needs. There would be uncontrolled, impulsive rages followed with denial, disavowed responsibility, and then extreme outpourings of affection. How does a child learn to feel safe in this topsyturvy world of conditional love?

She writes about her life and her mother in he memoir, An Abbreviated Life.

  Jennifer Chiaverini is the New York Times bestselling author of Mrs. Grant and Madame JuleMrs. Lincoln's DressmakerThe SpymistressMrs. Lincoln's Rival, and the Elm Creek Quilts series.

Her new novel, Fates and Traitors, is about John Wilkes Booth, the mercurial son of an acclaimed British stage actor and Covent Garden flower girl, committed one of the most notorious acts in American history—the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln.

  Nora Ephron was a phenomenal personality, journalist, essayist, novelist, playwright, Oscar-nominated screenwriter, and movie director (Sleepless in SeattleYou’ve Got MailWhen Harry Met SallyHeartburnJulie & Julia). She wrote a slew of bestsellers (I Feel Bad About My Neck: And Other Thoughts on Being a Woman; I Remember Nothing: And Other Reflections; Scribble, Scribble: Notes on the Media; Crazy Salad: Some Things About Women). She was celebrated by Hollywood, embraced by literary New York, and adored by legions of fans throughout the world.

Award-winning journalist Richard Cohen, writes about about his friend in his “third-person memoir,” She Made Me Laugh.

Downfall By J. A. Jance

Sep 14, 2016

  J. A. Jance is the New York Times bestselling author of the J. P. Beaumont series, the Joanna Brady series, the Ali Reynolds series, and five interrelated thrillers about the Walker Family as well as a volume of poetry.

Her latest, Downfall, is the latest installment in the Sheriff Joanna Brady series and Joanna has a lot on her plate. Pregnant and gearing up for a reelection bid, She is managing multiple cases plus trying to be a wife and a mother to her college bound daughter and rambunctious five-year-old son.

But when a personal tragedy forces her to the sidelines, she’s torn between the duty to her family and to the people she’s sworn to serve and protect. 

9/14/16 Panel

Sep 14, 2016

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, Director of the Journalism Program at the University at Albany Rosemary Armao, and political consultant and lobbyist, Libby Post.

  Andy Lazris, MD, is a practicing primary care physician who experiences the effects of Medicare policy on a daily basis. As a result, he believes that the way we care for our elderly has taken a wrong turn and that Medicare is complicit in creating the very problems it seeks to solve. Aging is not a disease to be cured; it is a life stage to be lived

His new book is Curing Medicare: A Doctor's View on How Our Health Care System Is Failing Older Americans and How We Can Fix It.

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