The Roundtable

1/11/17 Panel

12 hours ago

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Director of the Journalism Program at the University at Albany Rosemary Armao, and Communications Specialist Theresa Bourgeois.

“Speak softly and carry a big stick” Theodore Roosevelt famously said in 1901, when the United States was emerging as a great power. It was the right sentiment, perhaps, in an age of imperial rivalry but today many Americans doubt the utility of their global military presence, thinking it outdated, unnecessary or even dangerous.

In The Big Stick, Eliot A. Cohen—a scholar and practitioner of international relations—disagrees. He argues that hard power remains essential for American foreign policy.

   This week's Book Picks from Amy Lane at The Open Door Bookstore and Gift Gallery in Schenectady, NY.

List:
The Sleepwalker by Chris Bohjalian
The Meaning of Michelle: 16 Writers on the Iconic First Lady edited by Veronica Chambers
Silence by Shusaku Endo
The Power of Kindness by Piero Ferrucci
The Marches by Rory Stewart
100 Weight Loss Bowls by Heather Whinney
My Kite is Stuck! And Other Stories by Salina Yoon
The Secret Life of Squirrels: A Love Story by Nancy Rose

Are you tired? Do you suffer from chronic pain—headaches, backaches, or other chronic discomfort? Do you get depressed or anxious? Do you have allergies, rashes, or autoimmune issues? Have you lost your zest for life somewhere along the way?

If you have one or more of these symptoms, you may be suffering from a condition that Dr. Rachel Carlton Abrams calls Chronic Body Depletion.  The condition can be related to weight gain, high blood pressure, exhaustion, and many other symptoms that leave the body drained. 

In her new book: Bodywise: Discovering Your Body’s Intelligence for Lifelong Health and Healing she shows us not only how to recognize and treat the symptoms that plague them, but also offers strategies for optimum health and lifelong healing. 

1/10/17 Panel

Jan 10, 2017

   The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Director of the Journalism Program at the University at Albany Rosemary Armao, and Communications Specialist Theresa Bourgeois.

Book Cover - Waste Free Kitchen Handbook
http://www.danagunders.com/

  Despite a growing awareness of food waste, many well-intentioned home cooks lack the tools to change their habits. Dana Gunders new book, Waste-Free Kitchen Handbook: A Guide to Eating Well and Saving Money By Wasting Less Food is packed with engaging checklists, simple recipes, practical strategies, and educational infographics.

Gunders is a scientist at the Natural Resources Defense Council and the book contains techniques that call for minimal adjustments of habit, from shopping, portioning, and using a refrigerator properly to simple preservation methods including freezing, pickling, and cellaring.

Our Falling into Place series spotlights the important work of -and fosters collaboration between- not-for-profit organizations in our communities; allowing us all to fall into place.

Falling Into Place is supported by The Seymour Fox Memorial Foundation, Providing a helping hand to turn inspiration into accomplishment. See more possibilities … see more promise… see more progress.

Today we’ll learn about Eddy Alzheimer’s Services’ Alzheimer’s Caregiver Support Initiative. The goal of which is to help relieve the physical, emotional, and financial burden of caregivers in New York state that are caring for their loved ones with Alzheimer’s or Dementia.

Andrew Delollo is Grant Manager for Eddy Alzheimer’s Services and he joins us to tell us more. 

1/9/17 Panel

Jan 9, 2017

 The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, political consultant and lobbyist, Libby Post, and Communications Specialist Theresa Bourgeois.

Aaron Thier is the author of the novel The Ghost Apple, a semifinalist for the 2015 Thurber Prize for American Humor. He writes a column, Food & Consequences, for Lucky Peach and he is a regular book critic for the Nation.

In his novel, Mr. Eternity it's Key West in 2016. Sea levels are rising, coral reefs are dying. In short, everything is going to hell. It’s here that two young filmmakers find something to believe in: an old sailor who calls himself Daniel Defoe and claims to be five hundred and sixty years old. In fact, old Dan is in the prime of his life—an incredible, perhaps eternal American life. The story unfolds over the course of a millennium,

Early on the evening of March 13, 2013, the newly elected Pope Francis stepped out onto the balcony of St. Peter’s Basilica and did something remarkable: Before he imparted his blessing to the crowd, he asked the crowd to bless him, then bowed low to receive this grace. In the days that followed, Mark K. Shriver - along with the rest of the world - was astonished to see a pope who paid his own hotel bill, eschewed limousines, and made his home in a suite of austere rooms in a Vatican guesthouse rather than the grand papal apartment in the Apostolic Palace. By setting an example of humility and accessibility, Francis breathed new life into the Catholic Church, attracting the admiration of Catholics and non-Catholics alike.

In Pilgrimage, Shriver retraces Francis’s personal journey, revealing the origins of his open, unpretentious style and explaining how it revitalized Shriver’s own faith and renewed his commitment to the Church.

1/6/17 Panel

Jan 6, 2017

 The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Director of the Journalism Program at the University at Albany Rosemary Armao, Author and Activist Barbara Smith.

Malcolm Nance is a globally recognized counterterrorism expert and Intelligence Community member who has been deployed to intelligence operations in the Balkans, Middle East, and sub-Saharan Africa. He is the author of five books, including the New York Times bestseller Defeating ISIS, and is a counterterrorism analyst for NBC News and MSNBC.

His most recent book is The Plot to Hack America: How Putin’s Cyberspies and WikiLeaks Tried to Steal the 2016 Election.

1/5/17 Panel

Jan 5, 2017

    The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Director of the Journalism Program at the University at Albany Rosemary Armao, and political consultant and lobbyist, Libby Post.

David France is an author and filmmaker. His documentary film How to Survive a Plague was an Oscar finalist, won a Directors Guild Award and a Peabody Award, and was nominated for two Emmys, among other accolades.

His new book - How to Survive a Plague: The Inside Story of How Citizens and Science Tamed AIDS – expands on the documentary and is a powerful telling of the story of the grassroots movement of activists, many of them in a life-or-death struggle, who seized upon scientific research to help develop the drugs that turned HIV from a mostly fatal infection to a manageable disease.

The book follows the activists who learn to become their own researchers, lobbyists, drug smugglers, and clinicians, establishing their own newspapers, research journals, and laboratories, and as they go on to force reform in the nation’s disease-fighting agencies. The book is How to Survive a Plague.

Joan Rivers was more than a legendary comedian; she was an icon and a role model to millions, a fearless pioneer who left a legacy of expanded opportunity when she died in 2014.

Her life was a dramatic roller-coaster of triumphant highs and devastating lows: the suicide of her husband, her feud with Johnny Carson, her estrangement from her daughter, her many plastic surgeries, her ferocious ambition and her massive insecurities.

The Joan Rivers story is told in the new biography, Last Girl Before Freeway: The Life, Loves, Losses, and Liberation of Joan Rivers, by Leslie Bennetts. Bennetts is a veteran journalist who was the first woman ever to cover a presidential campaign for The New York Times and was a contributing editor for Vanity Fair for nearly 25-years.

In her early 20s Leanne Jacobs seemed to have it all – the perfect job with a great salary, the husband, the house; but on the inside, she felt constant pressure to work longer hours and didn’t have the mental space to take care of herself or nurture her marriage. So she took her first step on the path to creating what she would call “Beautiful Money.”

In Jacobs’ new book, Beautiful Money: The 4-Week Total Wealth Makeover, she outlines her wealth creation program, which helps us align our personal values and lifestyle with their income and career. She shows folks how to tidy up our finances and pursue their own definition of success by mindfully redesigning their lifestyle and redefining their self-worth.

Leanne Jacobs has worked in sales and marketing for several Fortune 100 companies, including Johnson & Johnson, Nike, DuPont, and L’oreal.

1/4/17 Panel

Jan 4, 2017

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Director of the Journalism Program at the University at Albany Rosemary Armao, and corporate attorney Rich Honen.

  From the domestication of the bird nearly ten thousand years ago to its current status as our go-to meat, the history of this seemingly commonplace bird is anything but ordinary.

How did chicken achieve the culinary ubiquity it enjoys today? It’s hard to imagine, but there was a point in history, not terribly long ago, that individual people each consumed less than ten pounds of chicken per year. Today, those numbers are strikingly different: we consumer nearly twenty-five times as much chicken as our great-grandparents did.

Collectively, Americans devour 73.1 million pounds of chicken in a day, close to 8.6 billion birds per year. How did chicken rise from near-invisibility to being in seemingly "every pot," as per Herbert Hoover's famous promise?

Emelyn Rude explores this phenomenon in Tastes Like Chicken.

John Nixon, the former CIA analyst who conducted the first prolonged interrogation of Saddam Hussein after his capture by U.S. forces, speaks publicly for the first time about this historic episode in his new book: Debriefing the President: The Interrogation Of Saddam Hussein.

Nixon offers not only an intimate and personal portrait of the Iraqi dictator, but new revelations about what he learned from Saddam and in his subsequent briefings of President George W. Bush and top administration officials—including Vice President Dick Cheney, CIA Director George Tenet, Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, and Secretary of Defense Robert Gates. 

Nixon also provides fresh, deeply informed perspectives on why U.S. policies in Iraq and the broader Middle East have failed so badly, and why the CIA and other parts of our intelligence establishment urgently require major reform. 

    This week's Book Picks  come from Phil Lewis of The Bennington Bookshop.

List:
The Sound of a Wild Snail Eating by Elisabeth Bailey
Born to Run by Bruce Springsteen
Two Days Gone by Randall Silvis (paperback out 1/10)
Exit West by Moshin Hamid (avail in March)
The Fact of a Body by Alexandria Marzano-Lesnevich (avail in May)
A Divided Spy by Charles Cumming (avail in February)
The Refugees by Viet Thanh Nguyen (avail in February)

Tens of thousands of men and women have left comfortable, privileged lives to join the Islamic State and kill for it. To them, its violence is beautiful and holy, and the caliphate a fulfillment of prophecy and the only place on earth where they can live and die as Muslims.

The new book - The Way of the Strangers - is an intimate journey into the minds of the Islamic State’s true believers. From the streets of Cairo to the mosques of London, Journalist Graeme Wood interviews supporters, recruiters, and sympathizers of the group.

Through character study and analysis, Wood provides a look at a movement that has inspired so many people to abandon or uproot their families. Many seek death—and they will be the terror threat of the next decade, as they strike back against the countries fighting their caliphate.

Graeme Wood is a national correspondent for The Atlantic and he teaches in the political science department at Yale University. His new book is: The Way of the Strangers

1/3/17 Panel

Jan 3, 2017

    The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, Associate Editor of the Times Union Mike Spain, and Director of the Journalism Program at the University at Albany Rosemary Armao.

When feminist writer Susan Faludi learned that her 76-year-old father ― long estranged and living in Hungary ― had undergone sex reassignment surgery, she was set on an investigation that would turn personal and urgent.

How was this new parent who identified as “a complete woman now” connected to the silent, explosive, and ultimately violent father she had known, the photographer who’d built his career on the alteration of images?

In 1932, as her husband assumed the presidency, Eleanor Roosevelt entered the claustrophobic, duty-bound existence of the First Lady with dread. By that time, she had put her deep disappointment in her marriage behind her and developed an independent life—now threatened by the public role she would be forced to play. A lifeline came to her in the form of a feisty campaign reporter for the Associated Press: Lorena Hickok. Over the next thirty years, until Eleanor’s death, the two women carried on an extraordinary relationship: They were, at different points, lovers, confidantes, professional advisors, and caring friends.

Susan Quinn has written a book about their unique relationship entitled Eleanor and Hick: The Love Affair That Shaped a First Lady

Susan Quinn is the author of Furious Improvisation: How the WPA and a Cast of Thousands Made High Art Out of Desperate Times and Marie Curie: A Life, among other books. Her work has appeared in The New York Times Magazine, the Atlantic, and other publications. She is the former president of PEN New England.

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