The Roundtable

New York Times Cooking Columnist David Tanis is an acclaimed chef and writer known for his simple yet revelatory approach to cooking. As Oblong Books describes his new book, Market Cooking, "A masterwork of recipes, approach, technique, and philosophy, David Tanis Market Cooking is as inspiring as it is essential." 

Annie Leibovitz is one of the most popular photographers of our time. Her new book, Annie Leibovitz: Portraits 2005-2016 is a new collection where she has captured the most influential and compelling figures of the last decade in the style that has made her famous. She will be at Oblong Books and Music in Rhinebeck on December 8th.

12/8/17 Panel

Dec 8, 2017

The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Joining me for the discussion: WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Former EPA Regional Administrator Judith Enck, Times Union Columnist Chris Churchill, Counter-Terrorism expert Malcolm Nance, and Siena College Economics Professor Aaron Pacitti.

  Legendary writer Dorothy Parker is considered one of the most celebrated and scathing wits of the twentieth century. Parker has been dead for forty-five years, but she’s on Facebook and she updates her status several times a day and has over 140,000 friends, thanks to author Ellen Meister.

Meister has been captivated by Dorothy Parker’s audacious voice since her teen years and in 2013, Meister delivered Farewell, Dorothy Parker, a nuanced tale that introduced the acid-tongued Mrs. Parker to a whole new generation of admirers. Now, Meister once again re-imagines the wickedly funny Parker in Dorothy Parker Drank Here.

WAMC is proud to present a special edition of The Roundtable with a live broadcast from The Clark in Williamstown, Massachusetts on Wednesday, January from 9 a.m. to noon.

WAMC is proud to present a special edition of The Roundtable with a live broadcast from the Saratoga Performing Arts Center on Thursday, August 8th from 9 A.M. to noon.

WAMC is proud to present a very special edition of The Roundtable, broadcast live from The Hyde Collection on Monday, June 24th from 9 a.m. to noon.

Over the past hundred years, average life expectancy in America has nearly doubled, due largely to scientific and medical advances, but also as a consequence of safer working conditions, a heightened awareness of the importance of diet and health, and other factors.

Yet while longevity is celebrated as an achievement in modern civilization, the longer people live, the more likely they are to succumb to chronic, terminal illnesses.

In early March, Alzheimer’s Association released its new facts and figures on the extent of the disease and its toll. They report that, in the United States, an estimated 5.4 million people are living with Alzheimer’s disease, including at least 800,000 who live alone. 

According the report, unless something is done to change the trajectory of the disease, as many as 16 million Americans will have Alzheimer’s by 2050.