same-sex marriage

Last week's Supreme Court ruling on gay marriage continues to be celebrated by some, derided by others. Either way, it is now the law of the land in all 50 states. According to some media reports, Daniel Alter is considered a possible choice to fill a vacancy on the New York Court of Appeals. If nominated and confirmed, he would become the first openly gay member of the Court of Appeals. Alter is a former general counsel at the New York State Department of Financial Services.

Matt Ryan

New York legalized gay marriage four years ago. Now, as our Capitol Correspondent Karen DeWitt reports, state leaders are reacting with enthusiasm to today's Supreme Court ruling.

Empire State Pride Agenda

The Empire State Pride Agenda scored a major victory almost exactly four years ago when New York legalized same-sex marriage. This week, the group’s executive director Nathan Schaefer was again celebrating after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled 5-4 that same-sex marriage bans are unconstitutional. He spoke with WAMC’s Ian Pickus shortly after the ruling came down Friday.

Albany Law School

The Supreme Court’s decision today that same-sex couples have a right to marry anywhere in the United States is a landmark ruling, according to Albany Law School Professor Stephen Clark. The 5-4 decision brings to a close more than 20 years of lawsuits and protests over same-sex marriage. Clark, who was in Washington for the ruling and earlier filed an amicus brief to the court on the issue, spoke with WAMC’s Ian Pickus.

The Supreme Court has declared that same-sex couples have a right to marry anywhere in the United States. Gay and lesbian couples already can marry in 36 states and the District of Columbia. The court's ruling on Friday means the remaining 14 states, in the South and Midwest, will have to stop enforcing their bans on same-sex marriage. The outcome is the culmination of two decades of Supreme Court litigation over marriage, and gay rights generally. Justice Anthony Kennedy wrote the majority opinion, just as he did in the court's previous three major gay rights cases dating back to 1996.

5/18/15 Panel

May 18, 2015

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, political consultant and lobbyist, Libby Post, and essayist, author, editor and activist - Barbara Smith.

Scheduled topics include Key Iraqi City Falls To ISIS; Marco Rubio on Iraq; Jeb Bush on Same-Sex Marriage; Biker Gang Shooting; Boston Bomber Death Penalty.

4/28/15 Panel

Apr 28, 2015

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, University at Albany Journalism Professor and Investigative Reporter, Rosemary Armao, and Associate Editor of the Times Union, Mike Spain.

Scheduled topics include: Baltimore Violence; Nepal; SCOTUS on Same-Sex Marriage; Pope on Climate Change; Japan & US Cooperation.

3/18/15 Panel

Mar 18, 2015

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, essayist, author, editor and activist - Barbara Smith and Political Consultant, Libby Post.

Schedule topics today include Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu wins election in Israel; Penn State frat suspended; Presbyterian Church approves same-sex marriage; US Budget; new findings in breast biopsies.

New York Congressman Chris Gibson is one of the more than 300 Republican lawmakers and operatives who has signed a friend-of-the-court brief with the U.S. Supreme Court making a conservative case for same-sex marriage.

Empire State Pride Agenda

Some 36 states have legalized same-sex marriage, including all of the Northeast. News late Friday that the Supreme Court will rule this term on gay marriage means it could soon be legal in all 50. Nathan Schaefer is executive director of the Empire State Pride Agenda. He tells WAMC’s Ian Pickus that he expects the court to follow in New York’s footsteps — little more than a decade after Massachusetts became the first state to legalize same-sex marriage.

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