science

The Roundtable
11:12 am
Tue March 11, 2014

Butterflies At miSci

  miSci is Schenectady NY’s Museum of Innovation and Science. You can escape winter’s seemingly never-ending chill and discover hundreds of brilliantly colored native butterflies at miSci’s new indoor butterfly house which is open through April 19th.

Dr. Mac Sudduth is miSci’s Executive Director and he joins us to talk about the Butterfly House and other goings-on at miSci.

We are also joined by Dr. Radislav Potyrailo a Principal Scientist in Chemistry & Chemical Engineering for GE Global Research. Tonight, he will be giving a lecture at miSci entitled Learning from Nature: Advancing Technologies from Biomimicry to Biomimetics and to Bioinspiration. He’s going to tell us a bit about sensors that were inspired by the iridescent scales of the Morpho butterfly wings.

The Roundtable
11:35 am
Thu January 23, 2014

"Smarter: The New Science Of Building Brain Power" By Dan Hurley

    Expanding upon one of the most-read New York Times Magazine features of 2012, Smarter penetrates the hot new field of intelligence research to reveal what researchers call a revolution in human intellectual abilities.

Shattering decades of dogma, scientists began publishing studies in 2008 showing that “fluid intelligence”—the ability to learn, solve novel problems, and get to the heart of things—can be increased through training.

The Roundtable
10:10 am
Mon January 20, 2014

Thomas Maier On The Couple Who Taught America How to Love

   Showtime's dramatic series Masters of Sex, starring Michael Sheen and Lizzy Caplan, is based on this real-life story of sex researchers William Masters and Virginia Johnson.

Convincing hundreds of men and women to shed their clothes and copulate, the pair were the nation’s top experts on love and intimacy. Highlighting interviews with the notoriously private Masters and the ambitious Johnson, critically acclaimed biographer Thomas Maier shows how this unusual team changed the way we all thought about, talked about, and engaged in sex while they simultaneously tried to make sense of their own relationship.

The Roundtable
10:35 am
Tue January 14, 2014

EepyBird's "How To Build A Hovercraft"

  From the Coke and Mentos fountain makers who found initial fame via Maker Faire and YouTube (more than 150 million views) comes a collection of DIY science projects guaranteed to inspire a love of experimentation. Their book is How to Build a Hovercraft.

Fritz Grobe and Stephen Voltz share their favorite projects: a giant air vortex cannon, a leaf blower hovercraft, a paper airplane that will fly forever, and many more.

Fritz Grobe and Stephen Voltz are the mad scientists behind EepyBird. Best known as "the Coke and Mentos guys," their viral videos have been seen over 150 million times. They experiment with soda and candy, sticky notes, paper airplanes, shampoo, plywood, and more, searching for ways to transform these everyday objects into something new and unforgettable. They are based in Buckfield, Maine. Half of the duo, Stephen Voltz joins us.

The Roundtable
10:35 am
Mon January 13, 2014

"Duck Quacks Don't Echo" On National Geographic Channel

 Michael Ian Black is a comedian by trade, having starred in the sketch comedy series “The State,” “Stella,” “Michael & Michael Have Issues” and more.

But he is also a man of science.

He is set to co-host “Duck Quacks Don’t Echo,” a National Geographic reality series that puts over-the-top theories to the test through in-studio and pre-produced experiments.

Black will co-star alongside fellow comedians Tom Papa and Seth Herzog, who will conduct a variety of zany experiments in order to answer these questions: What happens if you give someone a nonalcoholic drink but tell them it contains alcohol — will they act drunk? Can four ceramic coffee mugs support the entire weight of a pick-up truck? Can pigeons can actually remember human faces?

The show premieres tonight at 10PM on National Geographic.

The Roundtable
11:35 am
Thu December 19, 2013

"Sex Itself" By Sarah Richardson

 Human genomes are 99.9 percent identical—with one prominent exception. Instead of a matching pair of X chromosomes, men carry a single X, coupled with a tiny chromosome called the Y.

Using methods from history, philosophy, and gender studies of science, Sarah Richardson examines in her new book, Sex Itself, how gender has helped to shape the research practices, questions asked, theories and models, and descriptive language used in sex chromosome research.

Sarah Richardson is assistant professor of the history of science and of studies of women, gender, and sexuality at Harvard University.

The Roundtable
10:41 am
Tue November 5, 2013

National Geographic's "The Science of Everything"

From refrigerators to roller-coasters, from neon signs to digital music - everywhere you turn the things around you help explain the fundamentals of science. National Geographic’s new book, The Science of Everything reveals the science behind virtually everything.

David Pogue is the former New York Times tech columnist (he's now with Yahoo) has written the foreword to the book and we welcome him to the show.

New England News
5:36 pm
Fri October 4, 2013

Gov. Patrick Announces Manufacturing Investments in Berkshires

Letter press operator Tim Bizony, on right, shows Governor Deval Patrick some of the work being done at Crane Stationary in North Adams.
Credit Jim Levulis / WAMC

Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick held a cabinet meeting and made stops in the western part of the state today.

Tim Bizony is a letter press operator and one of the workers Governor Patrick spoke with at the Crane & Company Stationary site in North Adams.

“He was genuinely interested in what I do,” Bizony said. “He was fascinated by the machine. He asked a lot of questions and I was glad I was able to answer them for him.”

Read more
The Roundtable
10:35 am
Thu September 19, 2013

MCLA Center for Science and Innovation

      The Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts is boasting a brand new science center, the MCLA Center for Science and Innovation, on its campus in North Adams. The four-story, 65,000 square foot building cost more than $30 million, taking just about a year to build. The center will be the home of the chemistry, biology, physics, psychology, and environmental studies departments.

A grand opening celebration will take place early next month. In the meantime, we celebrate today with the woman behind this project for the last several years - Mary Grant, the 11th president of the Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts and the first alumna of the College to serve as its president.

The Roundtable
10:10 am
Thu September 19, 2013

NYS Department of Environmental Conservation Estuary Program

Silver eel

  On one day, Thursday Oct 10th, 3 thousand students, educators, and volunteers will visit 65 sites along the Hudson from New York Harbor to the mouth of the Mohawk.

It is being called “A Day In the Life of Hudson River.” 

  Hudson River Estuary Coordinator, Fran Dunwell and Hudson River Science Educator, Chris Bowser from the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation Estuary Program are here to tell us this morning about how this helps people get a feel for the diversity and dynamic nature of the Hudson River system.

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