Science & Technology

  This morning we will discuss the very sexy topic of inferential software. Our Tech Guru, Jesse Feiler, is here to help answer the question – is it worth it to spend $250 bucks just to turn on the lights?

Jesse Feiler is an app developer, consultant, trainer, and author. His latest book is: iOS App Development for Dummies. His apps include Minutes Machine the iPad-based app for managing meetings, agendas, and minutes; and Saranac River Trail app.

  This morning we discuss what Earth Day apps and where technology and Earth day intersect and can interact with our Tech Guru, Jesse Feiler.

If you're willing to stay up late and the skies are clear early next week, you can catch the first total lunar eclipse in more than three years that's visible throughout North America.

The total eclipse, the first visible throughout the U.S. since December 2012, will peak at about 3 a.m. EDT.

This morning we discuss what is old in computing and can lead to the new. Our Tech Guru, Jesse Feiler, is here to talk to us about how apps are built.

Jesse Feiler is an app developer, consultant, trainer, and author. His books include iOS 6 Foundations, and the forthcoming Sams Teach Yourself Objective-C Second Edition. His apps include Minutes Machine the iPad-based app for managing meetings, agendas, and minutes; and Saranac River Trail app.

    Joe and Jesse Feiler will discuss the lingering of Windows XP. Originally released in 2001, Windows XP has reached the end of its useful life. Microsoft announced that support (including security updates) will cease on April 8, 2014. Then, last week, with a minimum of fanfare, Microsoft sort of took it back.

What's going on? Joe and Jesse try to get to the bottom of it all with the help of Bryan Brayton – the Network Engineer for the City of Plattsburgh, where he’s been for the last 6 years. Previous to that he was the Network Administrator at Clinton Community College. He’s been in the IT field for about 16 years, has a BS in Computer Science, and is a Microsoft Certified System Engineer. His areas of expertise are in Windows servers and computer networking.

    Our Tech Guru, Jesse Feiler, joins us to discuss what’s new in ebooks and apps.

Jesse Feiler is an app developer, consultant, trainer, and author. His books include iOS 6 Foundations, and the forthcoming Sams Teach Yourself Objective-C Second Edition. His apps include Minutes Machine the iPad-based app for managing meetings, agendas, and minutes; and Saranac River Trail app.

Catch The Geminid Meteor Shower Tonight

Dec 13, 2013

Stargazers are in for a treat if they're willing to wake up really early Saturday morning.

The annual Geminid meteor shower peaks tonight, potentially serving up more than a hundred shooting stars per hour. The meteors will appear to emanate from the constellation Gemini (thus the name), but that's just an optical illusion. The meteors are actually remains of an asteroid whose fragments burn up in Earth's atmosphere as our planet passes through the field of debris.

  This morning we will discuss the mysteries of Blue Tooth technology. Our Tech Guru, Jesse Feiler, says there is new ways to use the technology.

Jesse is a developer, consultant, and author specializing in iOS, FileMaker databases, and technologies for small businesses, nonprofits, and municipal governments. His most recent books are iWork for Dummies, Sams Teach Yourself Core Data in 24 Hours, and its companion Objective-C in 24 Hours.

His app, Minutes Machine for iPad, is available on the App Store. It helps nonprofits, homeowner associations, and small businesses manage meetings and generate minutes in real-time.

Jesse Feiler - WiFi

Aug 22, 2013

    

  This morning we will discuss the mysteries of wi-fi. Our Tech Guru, Jesse Feiler, says there is new technology out there (specifically the new 802.11ac standard from the Wi-Fi Alliance and Quip) – changing where and when we can get on line.

Medical staff at Nathan Littauer Hospital
Nathan Littauer Hospital

A small Fulton County Hospital is on its way to becoming a major destination for patients in need of back surgery.

Nathan Littauer Hospital in Gloversville has purchased and received its first Renaissance Robotic System, a groundbreaking technology offering new hope for patients suffering from debilitating spine pain.

Renaissance is the only FDA approved surgical guidance system for spine surgeries, which will be performed by Dr. Jian Shen, who is responsible for bringing the technology to Gloversville.

New observations of a fairly well-studied star have revealed a system with at least six planets, three of which are in the star's habitable zone. This is the first time that three such planets have been spotted orbiting in this zone in the same system.

    Facebook, Twitter, and even mobile apps aren't just communication tools.

They're highly automated systems that provide a vast storehouse of data you can use to measure your organization's reach and influence -- and to help with grant-writing and fundraising.

Our tech guru, Jesse Feiler, joins us to tell us more.

    Ask our tech guru, Jesse Feiler, what he wants to talk about this morning and he will tell you – Intimate Objects. Our job is to find out what they are and what they are not. Jesse is here to provide answers to both questions.

    In an unparalleled collaboration, two leading global thinkers in technology and foreign affairs give us their widely anticipated, transformational vision of the future: a world where everyone is connected—a world full of challenges and benefits that are ours to meet and to harness.

America's "War on Terror" goes beyond the streets. Battles are being fought on a regular basis over the internet, from Chinese or Korean cyber attacks to hacks from groups and individuals within the United States.

As technology evolves and we become more reliant on the internet, the web presents a frontier of opportunity for mischief-makers, criminals and terrorists.

Scientists have unraveled the genome of the coelacanth, a rare and primitive fish once thought to be extinct, shedding light on how closely it's related to the first creatures to emerge from the sea.

The coelacanth, a fish that can reach up to 5 feet long and lives in deep ocean caves, had only been seen in fossils and was thought to have gone extinct some 70 million years ago. That was until 1938, when fishermen from the Comoros islands off the coast of Africa captured one in a net. A second coelacanth species was discovered off the Indonesian island of Sulewesi in 1997.

Ben Sklar

One of the most contentious areas of debate over the expansion of hydraulic fracturing for natural gas concerns a spike in seismic activity in unlikely areas that have begun fracking nearby. Some alarmed scientists say containment wells are putting undue pressure on faults deep underground. But industry interests disagree – that is, when they say anything at all.

  How should a company respond if a consumer asks it to stop tracking his or her behavior on the company’s website? And what role should a browser play in helping consumers communicate their preferences regarding online tracking? These are questions we will look to answer with our tech guru, Jesse Feiler.

Jesse is a developer, consultant, and author specializing in iOS, FileMaker databases, and technologies for small businesses, nonprofits, and municipal governments. His most recent books are iWork for Dummies, Sams Teach Yourself Core Data in 24 Hours, and its companion Objective-C in 24 Hours.

His app, Minutes Machine for iPad, is available on the App Store. It helps nonprofits, homeowner associations, and small businesses manage meetings and generate minutes in real-time. His website is northcountryconsulting.com.

WAMC's Brian Shields spoke with Jeff Deyette, senior energy analyst at the Union of Concerned Scientists. He is the author of Cooler Smarter: Practical Steps for Low-Carbon Living and toured New York this week to discuss how people can reduce their carbon footprints, including stops at the Ithaca Sustainability Center, Cornell University, and Albany Mayor Jerry Jennings’ Office of Energy and Sustainability.

RPI

We're all familiar with LED technology - Light-emitting diodes are used in applications as diverse as aviation lighting, automotive lighting and traffic signals. LEDs have allowed new text, video displays, and sensors to be developed, while their high switching rates are also useful in advanced communications technology.

An RPI student has been named the winner of a national competition for technological innovation...

Yahoo Redesign Aims to Make Site More Inviting

Feb 20, 2013

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) -- Yahoo is renovating the main entry into its website in an effort to get people to visit more frequently and linger for longer periods of time.

The long-awaited makeover of Yahoo.com's home page is the most notable change to the website since the Internet company hired Marissa Mayer as its CEO seven months ago. The new look will start to gradually roll out in the U.S early Wednesday.

Future Science: Using 3D Worlds to Visualize Data

Feb 20, 2013
Jon Kristian Bernhardsen / Flickr

CHICAGO (AP) -- Take a walk through a human brain? Fly over the surface of Mars? Computer scientists at the University of Illinois at Chicago are pushing science fiction closer to reality with a wraparound virtual world where a researcher wearing 3D glasses can do all that and more.

In the system, known as CAVE2, an 8-foot-high screen encircles the viewer 320 degrees. A panorama of images springs from 72 stereoscopic liquid crystal display panels, conveying a dizzying sense of being able to touch what's not really there.

Administration Developing Penalties for Cybertheft

Feb 20, 2013
Intel Free Press / Flickr

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Evidence of an unrelenting campaign of cyberstealing linked to the Chinese government is prompting the Obama administration to develop more aggressive responses to the theft of U.S. government data and corporate trade secrets.

Maybe you don't like your mobile phone carrier, but you like your phone and you want to keep it but change providers. An obscure change in federal law makes it illegal to switch without permission from your carrier.

If you have, for example, AT&T, in order to switch to T-Mobile you have to unlock the phone, and AT&T can now stop you from doing that.

The change in the copyright law has some people upset, and they're petitioning the White House for a fix.

Even people who've never been to New York can tell you how to hail one of the iconic yellow cabs there. You just raise an arm and flag one down.

But the city wants to change that. Following the lead of cities like San Francisco and Washington, D.C., New York wants to permit passengers to use smartphone apps to find a cab.

Since Mayor La Guardia established New York's modern taxi system in 1937, there have been two big innovations in cab hailing: the whistle and the red light bulb on top of apartment building awnings.

Apple said today that the computers of some of its employees were attacked by hackers, who used the same vulnerability to access computers at Facebook.

All Things D reports:

Ganging up on classmates online can get students suspended.

But sometimes teachers are the target of cyberbullying, and in North Carolina, educators have said enough is enough. State officials have now made it a crime to "intimidate or torment" teachers online.

Chip Douglas knew something was up with his 10th-grade English class. When he was teaching, sometimes he'd get a strange question and the kids would laugh. It started to make sense when he learned a student had created a fake Twitter account using his name.

Intel Working on TV Set-Top Box to Replace Cable

Feb 13, 2013

Intel Corp. said Tuesday that it will sell a set-top box that brings Internet-delivered movies and shows to a TV set this year.

Erik Huggers, general manager of Intel Media, said the company plans to sell a box that will offer "a vastly superior experience" to today's cable boxes.

There are various boxes today that bring Internet content to TV sets, with popular ones made by Roku and Apple. But Intel wants to go further and make its box and streaming service a replacement for cable.

Some 66 million years ago, about 75 percent of species on Earth disappeared. It wasn't just dinosaurs but most large mammals, fish, birds and plankton. Scientists have known this for a long time just from looking at the fossil record. If you dig deep enough, you find lots of dinosaur bones. And then a few layers up, they're gone.

But scientists couldn't figure out exactly what had caused this phenomenon. Of course, there were lots of theories.

This news ...

"For the last four months, Chinese hackers have persistently attacked The New York Times, infiltrating its computer systems and getting passwords for its reporters and other employees."

... appears to be "part of a broader campaign against American media reporting on Chinese leaders," NPR's Louisa Lim reports from Beijing.

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