Science & Technology

Albany, NY – Emily Roebling (1843-1903). Much of the construction of the iconic Brooklyn Bridge was directed by the architect's daughter-in-law, Emily.

Albany, NY – Mary Walker (1832-1919). She was a surgeon in the Civil War, and the first and only woman to be awarded the Medal of Honor.

Albany, NY – Marie Lavoisier (1758-1836). An arranged marriage led her to an unexpected role in the history of chemistry. As a laboratory assistant, translator, and scientific illustrator, Marie was instrumental in her husband's discoveries in chemistry.

Albany, NY – Emmy Noether (1882-1935). She went into the family business as a young girl, but Emmy soon surpassed her father and her brothers as a mathematician, proving concepts behind Einstein's theory of relativity.

Albany, NY – Elizabeth Blackwell (1821-1910). The first woman to earn a medical degree, Elizabeth was rejected from 29 medical schools before being accepted. She graduated at the top of her class.

Albany, NY – Mary Somerville (1780-1872). With almost no formal education, Mary became the most accomplished science writer of her time. The term scientist was coined to describe her.

Albany, NY – Maria Agnesi (1718-1799). This brilliant daughter of Italian nobility spoke five languages, wrote the first books on abstract geometry, and dreamed of being a nun.

Albany, NY – Anna Morandi Manzolini (1716-1774). Anna was an artist who sculpted detailed anatomical models out of wax that were used in medical schools for centuries to come.

Albany, NY – Laura Bassi (1711-1778). This Italian mother of 12 became the first female professor of physics. She also successfully petitioned her university employer for more responsibility and a higher salary.

Albany, NY – Lilavati (12th century). A noted Indian mathematician wrote a book used to teach algebra called Lilavati (or Leelavati). The book was named after his daughter who was also an excellent mathematician.

Pages