Science & Technology

Albany, NY – Dr. Shirley Ann Jackson rose from the segregated schools of Washington D.C. in the 1950's to become the first African American woman to earn a degree in physics from MIT. Years later, she was nominated by President Clinton to serve as the chairman of the United States Nuclear Regulatory commission. Today, Dr. Jackson is the president of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy New York, where she spoke about her fascinating career.

Albany, NY – How long does it take for a broken bone to heal? Biomedical engineer Kay C. Dee is working to speed up the healing process. Dee spoke about her work as a scientist and professor at Tulane University. Ms. Dee's webpage: http://www2.tulane.edu/article_news_details.cfm?ArticleID=4459

Albany, NY – Shira Billet and Dora Sosnowik have been friends since grade school. Recently these two students from Stella K. Abraham High School for Girls in Hewlit Bay Park New York took home a $100,000 scholarship from the Siemans foundation. The pair discovered a way to accurately measure the viscosity, or flow properties of very thin films, a technique that will help doctors, patients ...and spies.

Albany, NY – What do you get when you cross a passion for textiles with a commitment to the environment? How about a kinder, gentler cotton and a career in science. That's what Sally Fox got when she put her background in plant breeding and entomology (the study of insects) together with her lifelong hobby. Fox breeds naturally colored cotton that eliminates the need for toxic dyes that contaminate the environment. She talks about how she managed to turn her life's passion into a career.

Albany, NY – New technologies are constantly being developed in an effort to make our lives a little easier; mechanical engineers like Katie Vandergriff, who specializes in robotics, are leading the way. Vandergriff talks about what it's like to run her own company and to work as a mechanical engineer.

Albany, NY – Karen Williams is a biology professor at Union College in Schenectady New York, where she teaches, advises students, runs science and technology programs for young women. Williams is working on research to help new mothers suffering from post partum depression. In this story she speaks about her scientific work.

Albany, NY – Cheryl Bergman turned her love of fast planes and her skill in engineering into a career designing fighter jets for the military. Bergman talks about her exciting work at Lockheed Martin.

Albany, NY – How long does it take for a broken bone to heal? Biomedical engineer Kay C. Dee is working to speed up the healing process. Dee spoke about her work as a scientist and professor at Tulane University. Ms. Dee's webpage: http://www2.tulane.edu/article_news_details.cfm?ArticleID=4459

Albany, NY – Mary Manhein is a forensic anthropologist who is known to the world as, 'The Bone Lady'. She runs the FACES Lab at Louisiana State University where she uses forensic Science to help solve crimes and identify the dead. In addition to being a scientist who loves her work, Manhein is a wonderful writer and mom. For more information, please go to the FACES website http://www.lsu.edu/faceslab

Albany, NY – Tracy Drain is an engineer who helped build the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Today we follow Tracy as she waits for the orbiter to reach the red planet.

Albany, NY – Tracy Drain is an engineer who helped build the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Today we follow Tracy as she waits for the orbiter to reach the red planet.

Albany, NY – The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter will bring back more information than all the previous Mars missions put together. In our first audio diary, we follow Tracy Drain, a systems engineer for the orbiter project, on the journey to launch...and the white knuckle wait to see if the project will reach orbit and be successful. We learn not only what Tracy does, but also a little about who she is, and how her personal and professional worlds come together. Claes Adreasson, Producer.

Albany, NY – Last week, in the first part of our story on 'Women in Science', we focused on how several studies show the importance of young women and girls getting introduced to science, math, and technology at earlier and earlier grade levels. We also heard about the important role parents play in encouraging their children to take more math and science. This week, scientists tell us their own stories, including if and how, they were impacted by role models along their academic and professional career paths.

Albany, NY – PART 1 of 2 - Contrary to commonly held public opinion, parents, rather than peers or the media still have the greatest influence on their daughter's lives and life choices. Studies show that expectations and experiences from family and community members are more likely to influence girls' decisions to go into science, technology, engineering, and math, than even their innate abilities. We speak with several scientists and educators who tell us their personal stories.

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