Science & Technology

Albany, NY – (1867-1934) WHEN THE FAMILY BUSINESS IS SCIENCE, DON'T BE SURPRISED TO FIND A FEW NOBEL PRIZES IN THE CLOSET. ONE OF POLAND'S FAVORITE DAUGHTERS WON TWO, AND HER DAUGHTER, ANOTHER.

Albany, NY – (1866-1943) WHAT DO CUDDLY BUNNIES FLOPSY, MOPSY, COTTONTAIL AND PETER HAVE IN COMMON WITH FUNGUS AND ALGAE? ARTIST AND VICTORIAN NATURALIST BEATRIX POTTER.

Albany, NY – (1864-1922) THIS BOTANIST TRAVELED THE WORLD FINDING SPECIMENS FOR MUSEUMS. BUT HER MOST PRECIOUS COLLECTION WAS RIGHT HERE AT HOME - THE THOUSANDS OF NEW YORK CITY SCHOOL CHILDREN SHE INTRODUCED TO NATURE, BOTH DURING - AND AFTER - HER LIFETIME.

Albany, NY – (1850-1891) PLAYWRIGHT AUGUST STRINDBERG CALLED HER A MONSTROSITY, BUT THIS DAUGHTER OF 19TH CENTURY RUSSIAN NOBILITY REACHED GREAT MATHEMATICAL HEIGHTS. AND TODAY SHE'S IMMORTALIZED ON THE MOON.

Albany, NY – (1818-1889) THIS GREATEST AMERICAN SCIENTIST OF THE 19TH CENTURY NOT ONLY FOLLOWED HER OWN STAR SHE SPENT A LIFETIME OPENING DOORS SO GENERATIONS OF WOMEN COULD FOLLOW THEIRS.

Albany, NY – (1815-1852) WHEN MOM IS THE PRINCESS OF PARALLELOGRAMS AND DAD IS THE CENTURY'S RACIEST POET HOW' S A GIRL TO CALCULATE HER FUTURE? ADA AUGUSTA BYRON THOUGHT SHE COULD COUNT ON A COMPUTER. BUT SHE WAS A WOMAN AHEAD OF HER TIME.

Albany, NY – (1776-1831) IT'S NOT UNUSUAL FOR PARENTS AND TEENAGERS TO ARGUE OVER SCHOOLWORK, BUT THIS 18TH CENTURY MATHEMATICIAN HAD TO FIGHT FOR HER RIGHT TO STUDY. HER WORK IN NUMBER THEORY HELPS KEEP THE EIFFEL TOWER STANDING TODAY.

Albany, NY – (1750-1848) THIS 18TH CENTURY CINDERELLA OF SCIENCE ROSE FROM A LIFE OF SERVITUDE TO RECEIVE ROYAL HONORS AND WORLDWIDE ACCLAIM AS THE FIRST LADY OF ASTRONOMY. I'M KATE MULGREW WITH HER STORY.

Albany, NY – (1706-1749) IN A TIME AND PLACE WHERE A WOMAN'S FUTURE DEPENDS ON HER COURTING ABILITIES, WHAT DO YOU DO WITH - AN UGLY DAUGHTER? EDUCATE HER! SHE JUST MIGHT GROW UP TO BE A GROUNDBREAKING MATHEMATICIAN! EMILIE DU CHATELET DID. AND BY THE WAY - HER LOVE LIFE WASN'T TOO SHABBY EITHER.

Albany, NY – (fl. 1st. Cent. BCE/CE) CHEMICAL ENGINEER OR ALCHEMIST? THE PROOF MAY BE IN THE PUDDING, BUT THIS 'SISTER OF MOSES' HAS A LIFE STORY AS SHROUDED IN MIST AS THE KITCHEN DEVICE NAMED FOR HER.

Albany, NY – (c. 2640 BCE) Almost 5000 years ago she invented a fabric as translucent as ice and as light as a cloud. Reveling the secret of its creation became punishable by death.

Albany, NY – Mary Kies (1752-1837). Mary invented a method of weaving straw with silk. It proved to be a cost-effective way to make bonnets used by women working in fields.

Albany, NY – Theo Colburn is a professor of zoology and environmental health analyst. She is best known for her studies on the harmful effects of certain man-made chemicals on animals.

Albany, NY – Stephanie Kwolek (b.1923). She dreamed of becoming a fashion designer and later, a doctor. Stephanie didn't exactly do either, but the clothing she helped make saves lives. She is the chemist who invented Kevlar, the material used in bullet-proof vests.

Albany, NY – Gertrude Elion (1918-1999). As a Nobel Prize-winning biochemist and pharmacologist, Gertrude helped develop drugs to treat leukemia and arthritis, and prevent organ rejection.

Albany, NY – Frances Gabe (b.1915). Hate housework? Invent your way out of it! Frances Gabe did. She invented the self-cleaning house.

Albany, NY – Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin (1910-1994). While chemists around the world were trying to identify the composition of penicillin, Dorothy amazed them all by using x-rays to determine its structure.

Albany, NY – Grace Hopper (1906-1992). Grace was a pioneering computer scientist and Navy Admiral. She invented the compiler, the first program to translate computer programming language.

Albany, NY – Helen Taussig (1898-1986). Helen was almost deaf, so she diagnosed heart conditions by listening with her fingers. She eventually solved the mystery of blue baby syndrome.

Albany, NY – May Edward Chinn (1896-1980). May was the first African American woman to graduate from the Bellevue Hospital Medical College. She practiced medicine in Harlem for 50 years.

Albany, NY – Edith Quimby (1891-1982). As a pioneer in radiology, Edith helped physicians determine more precise doses of radiation needed for cancer treatment with the fewest side effects.

Albany, NY – Elizabeth Lee Hazen (1885-1975) and Rachel Fuller Brown (1908-1980). Elizabeth was a microbiologist and Rachel was a chemist. Their collaboration led to a vaccine for pneumonia and one of the first effective antifungal medications.

Albany, NY – Alice Evans (1881-1975). She began her career trying to make cheese taste better, but her research eventually led to laws mandating the pasteurization of milk.

Albany, NY – Lillie Rosa Minoka Hill (1876-1952). This daughter of a Mohawk Indian woman and a Quaker doctor ran a kitchen clinic out of her Wisconsin farmhouse for 47 years.

Albany, NY – Sara Josephine Baker (1873-1945). Dr. Joe was the first woman to earn a doctorate in public health from New York University. She spent her career working to improve health care for the poor.

Albany, NY – Ellen Churchill Semple (1863-1932). Ellen was an influential geographer. She was among the first to write about the ways the natural environment impacted the course of human history.

Albany, NY – Emily Roebling (1843-1903). Much of the construction of the iconic Brooklyn Bridge was directed by the architect's daughter-in-law, Emily.

Albany, NY – Mary Walker (1832-1919). She was a surgeon in the Civil War, and the first and only woman to be awarded the Medal of Honor.

Albany, NY – Marie Lavoisier (1758-1836). An arranged marriage led her to an unexpected role in the history of chemistry. As a laboratory assistant, translator, and scientific illustrator, Marie was instrumental in her husband's discoveries in chemistry.

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