Science & Technology

Albany, NY – (1750-1848) THIS 18TH CENTURY CINDERELLA OF SCIENCE ROSE FROM A LIFE OF SERVITUDE TO RECEIVE ROYAL HONORS AND WORLDWIDE ACCLAIM AS THE FIRST LADY OF ASTRONOMY. I'M KATE MULGREW WITH HER STORY.

Albany, NY – (1706-1749) IN A TIME AND PLACE WHERE A WOMAN'S FUTURE DEPENDS ON HER COURTING ABILITIES, WHAT DO YOU DO WITH - AN UGLY DAUGHTER? EDUCATE HER! SHE JUST MIGHT GROW UP TO BE A GROUNDBREAKING MATHEMATICIAN! EMILIE DU CHATELET DID. AND BY THE WAY - HER LOVE LIFE WASN'T TOO SHABBY EITHER.

Albany, NY – (fl. 1st. Cent. BCE/CE) CHEMICAL ENGINEER OR ALCHEMIST? THE PROOF MAY BE IN THE PUDDING, BUT THIS 'SISTER OF MOSES' HAS A LIFE STORY AS SHROUDED IN MIST AS THE KITCHEN DEVICE NAMED FOR HER.

Albany, NY – (c. 2640 BCE) Almost 5000 years ago she invented a fabric as translucent as ice and as light as a cloud. Reveling the secret of its creation became punishable by death.

Albany, NY – Mary Kies (1752-1837). Mary invented a method of weaving straw with silk. It proved to be a cost-effective way to make bonnets used by women working in fields.

Albany, NY – Theo Colburn is a professor of zoology and environmental health analyst. She is best known for her studies on the harmful effects of certain man-made chemicals on animals.

Albany, NY – Stephanie Kwolek (b.1923). She dreamed of becoming a fashion designer and later, a doctor. Stephanie didn't exactly do either, but the clothing she helped make saves lives. She is the chemist who invented Kevlar, the material used in bullet-proof vests.

Albany, NY – Gertrude Elion (1918-1999). As a Nobel Prize-winning biochemist and pharmacologist, Gertrude helped develop drugs to treat leukemia and arthritis, and prevent organ rejection.

Albany, NY – Frances Gabe (b.1915). Hate housework? Invent your way out of it! Frances Gabe did. She invented the self-cleaning house.

Albany, NY – Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin (1910-1994). While chemists around the world were trying to identify the composition of penicillin, Dorothy amazed them all by using x-rays to determine its structure.

Albany, NY – Grace Hopper (1906-1992). Grace was a pioneering computer scientist and Navy Admiral. She invented the compiler, the first program to translate computer programming language.

Albany, NY – Helen Taussig (1898-1986). Helen was almost deaf, so she diagnosed heart conditions by listening with her fingers. She eventually solved the mystery of blue baby syndrome.

Albany, NY – May Edward Chinn (1896-1980). May was the first African American woman to graduate from the Bellevue Hospital Medical College. She practiced medicine in Harlem for 50 years.

Albany, NY – Edith Quimby (1891-1982). As a pioneer in radiology, Edith helped physicians determine more precise doses of radiation needed for cancer treatment with the fewest side effects.

Albany, NY – Elizabeth Lee Hazen (1885-1975) and Rachel Fuller Brown (1908-1980). Elizabeth was a microbiologist and Rachel was a chemist. Their collaboration led to a vaccine for pneumonia and one of the first effective antifungal medications.

Albany, NY – Alice Evans (1881-1975). She began her career trying to make cheese taste better, but her research eventually led to laws mandating the pasteurization of milk.

Albany, NY – Lillie Rosa Minoka Hill (1876-1952). This daughter of a Mohawk Indian woman and a Quaker doctor ran a kitchen clinic out of her Wisconsin farmhouse for 47 years.

Albany, NY – Sara Josephine Baker (1873-1945). Dr. Joe was the first woman to earn a doctorate in public health from New York University. She spent her career working to improve health care for the poor.

Albany, NY – Ellen Churchill Semple (1863-1932). Ellen was an influential geographer. She was among the first to write about the ways the natural environment impacted the course of human history.

Albany, NY – Emily Roebling (1843-1903). Much of the construction of the iconic Brooklyn Bridge was directed by the architect's daughter-in-law, Emily.

Albany, NY – Mary Walker (1832-1919). She was a surgeon in the Civil War, and the first and only woman to be awarded the Medal of Honor.

Albany, NY – Marie Lavoisier (1758-1836). An arranged marriage led her to an unexpected role in the history of chemistry. As a laboratory assistant, translator, and scientific illustrator, Marie was instrumental in her husband's discoveries in chemistry.

Albany, NY – Emmy Noether (1882-1935). She went into the family business as a young girl, but Emmy soon surpassed her father and her brothers as a mathematician, proving concepts behind Einstein's theory of relativity.

Albany, NY – Elizabeth Blackwell (1821-1910). The first woman to earn a medical degree, Elizabeth was rejected from 29 medical schools before being accepted. She graduated at the top of her class.

Albany, NY – Mary Somerville (1780-1872). With almost no formal education, Mary became the most accomplished science writer of her time. The term scientist was coined to describe her.

Albany, NY – Maria Agnesi (1718-1799). This brilliant daughter of Italian nobility spoke five languages, wrote the first books on abstract geometry, and dreamed of being a nun.

Albany, NY – Anna Morandi Manzolini (1716-1774). Anna was an artist who sculpted detailed anatomical models out of wax that were used in medical schools for centuries to come.

Albany, NY – Laura Bassi (1711-1778). This Italian mother of 12 became the first female professor of physics. She also successfully petitioned her university employer for more responsibility and a higher salary.

Albany, NY – Lilavati (12th century). A noted Indian mathematician wrote a book used to teach algebra called Lilavati (or Leelavati). The book was named after his daughter who was also an excellent mathematician.

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