SCOTUS

  With only eight jurists, the Supreme Court has been punting of late.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Union College political science professor Brad Hays talks about this new paradigm with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

  The Supreme Court is one justice shy of a baseball team.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Connecticut Senator Chris Murphy tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock he hopes the Merrick Garland standoff doesn’t set a new precedent.

  How did gay and lesbian couples’ right to marry go from unthinkable to inevitable? How did the individual right to bear arms, dismissed as fraudulent by Chief Justice Warren Burger in 1990, become a constitutional right in 2008? And what compelled President George W. Bush to rein in many of his initiatives in the war on terror before leaving office, even though past presidents have had a free hand in wartime? We are likely to answer that, in each case, the Supreme Court remade our nation’s most fundamental law.

Yet as the award-winning legal scholar David Cole argues in Engines of Liberty, citizen activists are the true drivers of constitutional change.

  Our government is failing us. From health care to immigration, from the tax code to climate change, our political institutions cannot deal effectively with the challenges of modern society. Why the dysfunction? Contemporary reformers single out the usual suspects, including polarization and the rise in campaign spending. But what if the roots go much deeper, to the nation’s founding?

In Relic, William Howell and Terry Moe point to the Constitution as the main culprit. The framers designed the Constitution some 225 years ago for a simple agrarian society. But the form of government they settled upon, a separation of powers system with a parochial Congress at its center, is entirely ill-equipped to address the serious social problems that arise in a complex, post-industrial nation. We are prisoners of the past, burdened with an antiquated government that cannot make effective policy, and often cannot do anything at all.

The solution is to update the Constitution for modern times.

     In the decades after the landmark Brown v. Board of Education Supreme Court decision, busing to achieve school desegregation became one of the nation’s most controversial civil rights issues. 

Audio Pending...

  The new book Why Busing Failed examines the pitched battles over busing on a national scale focusing on cities such as Boston, Chicago, New York and Pontiac, Michigan. The book shows how school officials, politicians, the courts and the media disregarded the rights of black students and gave precedents to the desires white parents who opposed desegregation. Why Busing Failed is authored by Matthew Delmont, Associate Professor of History at Arizona State University.

  January 20th, 2017. That’s the earliest Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell thinks the next Supreme Court justice should be named.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Connecticut Representative Elizabeth Esty tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock about her new “SCOTUS” bill. 

  Merrick Garland appears qualified for the Supreme Court, but he’s stuck in limbo.

In today’s Congressional Corner, WAMC’s Alan Chartock continues his conversation with former Deputy Solicitor General of the U.S. Philip Lacovara. 

  Will Merrick Garland get a vote in the Senate in 2016?

In today’s Congressional Corner, New York representative Paul Tonko tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock that the Republicans have gravely miscalculated.

  In today’s Congressional Corner, Union College political science professor Brad Hays and WAMC’s Alan Chartock continue their conversation about the Supreme Court’s vacancy.

Should Americans get used to an eight-person Supreme Court?

In today’s Congressional Corner, Alan Chartock is joined by Union College political science professor Brad Hays to discuss the possibility that Antonin Scalia will be replaced.

  The Supreme Court could be down a member for another 12 months.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Tim Vercellotti, director of the Western New England University poll and professor of political science, tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock that most Americans want a new justice on the bench. 

  Is Merrick Garland the next Supreme Court justice or merely a political pawn?

In today’s Congressional Corner, Massachusetts Representative Jim McGovern tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock that Garland is eminently qualified to sit on the high court.

  President Obama has more than 300 days left in office.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Congressional Quarterly’s David Hawkings tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock that the White House intends to nominate a new Supreme Court justice during that time. 

  An eight-person Supreme Court is either an emergency or the new normal depending on who you ask.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Massachusetts Representative Richard Neal tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock that President Obama isn’t a lame duck for another eight months. 

  The death of Antonin Scalia led to a political standoff in a matter of hours.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Connecticut Representative Elizabeth Esty tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock that the late jurist must be replaced ASAP. 

  Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia died last weekend at the age of 79.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Alan Chartock speaks with New York Congressman, Paul Tonko, about what will happen next.

Stephen Gottlieb: Scalia’s Legacy

Feb 16, 2016

As my dear friend Vincent Bonventre has written, “All good Americans are saddened by the news that Justice Antonin Scalia has died.” But this is also a moment to consider his role on the Court.

  In his new book - Unfit for Democracy – WAMC Commentator and Albany Law Professor Stephen Gottlieb takes a critical look at the decisions of the U.S. Supreme Court under Chief Justice John Roberts, asserting that the interpretation of constitutional law should be applied with a focus on preserving the system of government put in place by our founding fathers.

He joins us this morning to discuss Unfit for Democracy and preview his hour-long conversation tomorrow at Albany Law School with Alan Chartock beginning at 1PM at the Law School’s Dean Alexander Moot Courtroom. That sit-down will be aired at a later date here on WAMC and will take place in front of a live audience and is open to the public.

Prof. Gottlieb, Albany Law School's Jay and Ruth Caplan Distinguished Professor of Law, is the author of Morality Imposed: The Rehnquist Court and the State of Liberty in America he is also an expert on the Supreme Court, constitutional theory and election campaign law.

  The nation’s highest court returns for its next term in October.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Union College political science professor Brad Hays tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock that the Supreme Court isn’t immune from political developments.

  The Supreme Court wrapped up its term last month by deciding several important cases.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Union College political science professor Brad Hays delves into the decisions with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

4/29/15 Panel

Apr 29, 2015

  

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, political consultant Libby Post, and and essayist, author, editor and activist - Barbara Smith.

Topics include Baltimore Update, SCOTUS Gay Marriage Case, Bernie Sanders Runs for President, Nepal Update, Weather Extremes.

4/28/15 Panel

Apr 28, 2015

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, University at Albany Journalism Professor and Investigative Reporter, Rosemary Armao, and Associate Editor of the Times Union, Mike Spain.

Scheduled topics include: Baltimore Violence; Nepal; SCOTUS on Same-Sex Marriage; Pope on Climate Change; Japan & US Cooperation.

3/4/15 Panel

Mar 4, 2015

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, SUNY at Albany journalism professor and investigative journalist, Rosemary Armao, and Times Union Associate Editor, Mike Spain.

Topics include: Netanyahu's address to congress; Obamacare goes to Supreme Court; Hillary Clinton's email usage; Harsher penalties for New York’s Drivers; Petraeus reaches Plea Deal.

1/19/15 Panel

Jan 19, 2015

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, NYPIRG’s Legislative Director Blair Horner and WAMC newsman, Ray Graf.

Topics include U.S. Lawmakers in Cuba, Panetta on Paris Attacks, Supreme Court to Decide Marriage Rights for Gay Couples, Obama Seeks to Raise Taxes on Wealthy.

  The new year could mean some major Supreme Court actions.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Union College political science professor Brad Hays tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock that same-sex marriage is due for a landmark decision.

  The midterms got all the attention, but the Supreme Court has plenty on its plate.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Union College political science professor Brad Hays tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock about some key upcoming decisions.

9/30/14 Panel

Sep 30, 2014

  Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, newsman Ray Graf, and Albany Journalism Professor and Investigative Reporter, Rosemary Armao.

Topics include:
White House Intruder
Hong Kong Protests
Supreme Court on Early Voting
Judge on Rikers Beating

Capitalism v. Democracy

Sep 15, 2014

  In the new book, Capitalism v. Democracy, law professor Timothy Kuhner looks to offer the keys to understanding why corporations are now citizens, money is political speech, limits on corporate spending are a form of censorship, democracy is a free market, and political equality and democratic integrity are unconstitutional constraints on money in politics.

Kuhner says Supreme Court opinions have dictated these conditions in the name of the Constitution and he explores the reasons behind these opinions, reveals that they form a blueprint for free market democracy, and demonstrates that this design corrupts both politics and markets.

Timothy Kuhner is Associate Professor at Georgia State University College of Law and we welcome him to The Roundtable this morning.

  Several important cases could be making their way to the Supreme Court.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Union College political science professor Brad Hays tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock what he has his eye on.

  The final days of the Supreme Court’s term were a flurry of high-profile cases.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Union College political science professor Brad Hays tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock about some of the key decisions.

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