sentencing

hbo.com

  America is the most punitive nation in the world, handing out historically harsh sentences that largely dispense with the concept of rehabilitation.

Alan and Susan Raymond - Oscar and Emmy winners for HBO’s I Am a Promise: The Children of Stanton Elementary School - explore the reality of “the other death penalty” in Toe Tag Parole: To Live and Die on Yard A.

Featuring exclusive, unprecedented access, Toe Tag Parole: To Live And Die On Yard A was shot entirely at California State Prison, Los Angeles County, a maximum-security facility in the Mojave Desert. The documentary debuts on Monday, August 3rd at 9PM on HBO.

An exterior view of the Massachusetts State House in Boston
wikipedia.org

A debate over making substantial changes to the criminal justice system in Massachusetts began in earnest today as advocates for reform traveled to the statehouse to lobby legislators.

Busloads of activists from Springfield, Holyoke, Worcester and elsewhere traveled to the Statehouse in Boston Tuesday to rally and attend a legislative hearing in support of a bill to overhaul aspects of the state’s approach to crime.

Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick has unveiled a series of sentencing reforms, including efforts to curb sentencing on youth offenders convicted of first-degree murder. 

Governor Patrick released a bill titled “An Act to Reform the Juvenile Justice System in the Commonwealth.” Two primary focuses of the bill would extended juvenile court jurisdiction from 17 years old to 18 years old, and would also prohibit mandatory life-sentences without parole for those convicted of first degree murder between ages 14 and 18.

In a prepared statement the Governor said…

Federal prosecutors are recommending a 25-year prison sentence for a Massachusetts man convicted of conspiring to help al-Qaida.

Prosecutors to Recommend Sentence in Terror Case

Apr 10, 2012

Prosecutors are set to make their sentencing recommendation for a Massachusetts man convicted of conspiring to help al-Qaida.  WAMC's Tristan O'Neill reports...

Tarek Mehanna of Sudbury was convicted in December of traveling to Yemen to seek training in a terrorist camp with the intention of going on to Iraq to fight U.S. soldiers.

His lawyers say he should not be sentenced to more than 6 ½ years in prison. They say he never ended up receiving terrorist training, never provided any funds or weapons to al-Qaida and never actually threatened U.S. security interests.