Sheldon Silver

Office of New York Governor Andrew Cuomo

2015 saw the fall of two of the three most powerful people in state government, and the rise of one U.S. Attorney. 

The latest Siena College poll finds that most people agree with the corruption conviction of the state’s former longtime Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver, who was found guilty on seven counts two weeks ago.

Karen Dewitt. WAMC

The last time the state held a constitutional convention, Bobby Kennedy was Senator. That was in 1967.  The last time a constitutional convention met and voters actually ratified it’s result, was 75 years ago. It was in 1938, at the height of the great depression.

Blair Horner: The Former Speaker Is Convicted

Dec 7, 2015

When former Assembly Speaker Silver was convicted of corruption on all counts, there was also a second conviction: Albany’s way of conducting the public’s business.  From the court proceedings’ first days, it was clear that Albany’s ethics were also on trial.

Despite Trials, Little Talk Of Reform In Albany

Nov 18, 2015
Flickr/wadester16

The New York state legislature is seemingly back to business as usual, with majority parties holding planning meetings, and the new session set to begin right after the holidays. But as Karen DeWitt reports, there has been little public discussion about a corruption crisis that has led to the two most powerful men in the legislature both on trial in federal court this month.

Blair Horner: Albany On Trial

Nov 16, 2015

As the former New York State Senate Majority Leader goes to trial and his former counterpart Assembly Speaker is still in court, it has become clear that whatever the outcome, Albany’s ethics is on trial.

Karen DeWitt

For the second time in a month, one of New York State's biggest political figures is going on trial on corruption charges.

A new Siena College poll finds that while New York voters support efforts to rein in state government corruption, they're more concerned about whether lawmakers pass the budget on time.  Governor Andrew Cuomo has tied one to the other…   

51 percent of voters told Siena ethics reform would reduce government corruption. 44 percent think it will have little or no impact. The poll was released the same day former Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver was being arraigned on federal corruption charges; Silver’s arrest has prompted a new round of ethics debate in Albany.

Blair Horner: Albany's "Watergate" Moment

Feb 23, 2015


The recent indictment of former Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver is simply the latest in a series of scandals involving the conflicts created by allowing sitting legislators to earn unlimited, unrestricted income from outside jobs.  But the controversy surrounding the former Speaker’s “moonlighting” is not the first time the issue has been raised.  The ability of sitting lawmakers to profit in any profession or business has been central to other recent scandals.  Here are some of the most high profile examples:

  

  New York’s political class was stunned by Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver’s arrest.

In today’s Congressional Corner, New York representative Sean Patrick Maloney tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock the allegations are “personally offensive.”

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