smoking

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WAMC photo by Dave Lucas

The fight against tobacco use is global:  approximately 1 person dies from a disease caused by tobacco use every six seconds around the world.   New York joins a worldwide effort to discourage tobacco use.

Young smokers
Valentin Ottone/Flickr

After two days of floor debate, the Vermont House has sent a bill to the Senate that would raise the smoking age.

Young smokers
Valentin Ottone/Flickr

A bill that was before the Vermont House to raise the smoking age was sent back to committee Tuesday for fiscal review.

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A legislative task force is expected to decide whether to recommend that Connecticut lawmakers vote to ban smoking in vehicles when a child is inside.


The New York Times recently exposed how the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, the lobbying arm of Big Business in America, was advancing the cause of the tobacco industry around the world.  The U.S. Chamber has been lobbying to block the efforts of nations to enact pro-health measures that seek to reduce the carnage caused by smoking.

Jim Levulis / WAMC

On the anniversary of the Great American Smokeout, a leading anti-cancer group says Governor Cuomo’s administration should be spending more to cut back on smoking in New York.

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Today marks the 39th annual Great American Smokeout. According to the American Cancer Society, one of every three cancer deaths is caused by smoking. WAMC’s Berkshire Bureau Chief Jim Levulis spoke with society spokesman Tom Flanagan about the yearly initiative.

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ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — A new report from the American Cancer Society says New York state needs to do more to prevent smoking. 

The Cancer Action Network at the American Cancer Society analyzed the state's efforts to combat cancer through screenings, tobacco taxes, smoking bans and restrictions on tanning booths.

While the state won high marks for breast and cervical cancer screening programs and restrictions on where people can smoke, the group says the state should reverse recent cuts in funds for programs to prevent tobacco use.

8/8/14 Panel

Aug 8, 2014

  Today's panelists are WAMC’s Ray Graf, political consultant Libby Post and Daily Gazette Editor Judy Patrick.

Topics include:
ISIS Airstrikes
Montana Senator Drops Out
NCAA
Smoker's Happiness
Hot Car Death

8/7/14 Panel

Aug 7, 2014

  Today's panelists are Political Activist Libby Post, Publisher Emeritus of The Daily Freeman, Ira Fusfeld, and associate editor of the Times-Union, Mike Spain.

Topics include:
Border Patrol
High Speed Rail
Smoker's Happiness
Hot Car Death
Nixon Resignation Anniversary

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The Albany Common Council could decide tonight to expand its smoking ban in city parks. If passed, the measure would carry a 50 dollar fine and go into effect immediately.

It is already against the law to smoke on playgrounds or ball-fields in the city. Back in 2012, the Albany Common Council approved a limited ban on smoking in areas of parks where children gather, including playgrounds, athletic fields and swimming pools.

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A new law restricting smoking in Vermont went into effect Tuesday. Its provisions include banning smoking in cars when children under 8 are in the vehicle.

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Vermont's top public health official is hopeful a series of new laws restricting smoking will encourage more people to quit.

E-Cigarettes are rapidly gaining popularity.

Lauren Dutra, post-doctoral scholar at the University of California, San Francisco's School of Medicine, is studying the correlation between usages of these different tobacco products.

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The Vermont House is putting off a debate on whether to raise the minimum age for purchasing tobacco products in Vermont from 18 to 21.

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Those health warnings on the side of a package or carton of cigarettes are well-established and have become more severe and graphic over the years. That warning from the Surgeon General was the result of a landmark 1964 report by the Surgeon General, establishing a link between cigarettes and heart disease and cancer. Fifty years later, the acting Surgeon General, Rear Admiral Boris Lushniak, says progress has been made, but smoking remains a serious health problem.

Albany is well known for its overblown promises and rhetorical hype.  Often newly passed laws are promoted as “historic” and criticisms of health reforms paint a picture of the end of civilization as we know it.

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This week marks the 10th anniversary of New York State’s Clean Indoor Air Act, which prohibits smoking in all indoor workplaces, including restaurants and bars. While smoking cessation advocates are celebrating the anniversary, they also say there is more to be done to protect public health.

Higher prices have been shown to encourage smokers to quit or reduce their consumption of cigarettes.  Cigarette tax evasion makes cigarettes cheaper and reduces the public health benefits of New York’s excise tax, as well as depriving the state of much-needed revenue.  Were the tax collected on all cigarettes smoked in New York, tens of thousands of adults would quit rather than pay higher prices, and state revenues would dramatically increase.

Blair Horner: From one cliff to the next

May 6, 2013

Tobacco companies are an extreme example of how greed trumps morality in America’s marketplace.  Every year roughly 500,000 smokers die from tobacco use and the industry knows it must at least replace those lost customers – plus the ones who successfully quit the addiction.

4/23/13 - Panel

Apr 23, 2013

  Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Ray Graf, and Selma Kaplan. Joe Donahue moderates.

This morning our discussion topics include:
• Bombing Suspect Charged
•Death penalty discussion with WAMC listeners
• NY Smoking Age to 21?
 

Blair Horner
C.W. McKeen / The Post - Standard, 2006

  New York State – and much of the nation – has made tremendous strides in reducing smoking rates.  In the mid-1960s, nearly half of Americans smoked; today it’s roughly half that nationwide and lower still in New York.

The successes have come as the result of scientific findings that have linked smoking to lung cancer and other health problems.  Those scientific breakthroughs also identified the health risks faced by nonsmokers who were exposed to second hand smoke from tobacco products.

It's that time of year again when millions of Americans vow to create good habits and break bad ones.

We welcome Jeremy Dean, the psychologist behind PsyBlog,  to explain why it is so difficult to modify our behavior -- and to stick with the change. His book is called Making Habits, Breaking Habits: Why We Do Things, Why We Don't, and How to Make Any Change Stick.

Tobacco kills more than 400,000 Americans every year and costs the country about $100 billion in health care bills.  Despite successes in curbing tobacco use over the past four decades, it still is the leading preventable cause of death in the United States.  

New York State’s efforts to reduce smoking have had a tremendous impact.  Between 2003 and 2010, the adult smoking rate in New York fell by 28 percent.  During that time, the nation’s smoking rate slipped only 11 percent.  New York high school students’ smoking rate dropped an incredible 38 percent, more than twice the nation’s decline.

A federal appeals court ruled last week that tobacco companies are not required to comply with the implementation of new graphic warning labels on cigarette packs, arguing that the law violated corporate free speech rights.  These warnings are required by the federal government and are supposed to go into effect next month.

New York receives a decent, but mixed, review for its legislative work to combat cancer, according to a new report,  How Do You Measure up?: A Progress Report on State Legislative Activity to Reduce Cancer Incidence and Mortality (www.acscan.org) issued by the American Cancer Society’s Cancer Action Network.

A new report from the federal government’s Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) contains good news and bad news about smoking in America.    First the good news, according to the CDC, total cigarette consumption continued an 11-year downward trend with a 2.5 percent decline from 2010 to 2011.  

Smoking remains the number one cause of preventable deaths in the US. Last year, nearly half a million people died of smoking-related illnesses like emphysema and lung cancer. That’s nearly one of every five deaths, a number that is greater than the number of deaths caused by AIDS, drug and alcohol use, motor vehicle injuries, suicides, and murders combined. Smoking also costs American taxpayers and businesses over $150 billion a year in terms of health care and lost productivity – that’s approximately $7 for every pack of cigarettes sold.

 

The nation has made tremendous progress in reducing the number of cancer deaths.  But a new trend is developing – cancers caused by the American lifestyle.

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